Ask Laskas: Your Turn to Give Advice on Sibling Tension | Reader's Digest

Ask Laskas: Your Turn to Give Advice on Sibling Tension

Jeanne Marie Laskas writes our magazine's monthly advice column; now you help counsel this woman for possible inclusion in an upcoming issue.

 

My twin sister and I have been arguing lately. I keep trying to talk to her, but she’s constantly moody. I do a lot for her, but if I ask for a favor, she doesn’t want to do it. I love my sister, but she doesn’t think about my feelings. How can we mend our relationship?
—Hurt Genetic Clone

What’s your take? Give your best advice in the comments below, and your answer might appear in the magazine.

Have your own qualm? Send your questions about manners, parents, partners, or office politics to advice@readersdigest.com. Sending gives us permission to edit and publish.

  • Your Comments

    • jana yousef

      Actually i have a younger sister. she’s two years younger than me. her actions sometimes drive me crazy because she imitates me in some actions but later i realized that that act was just her way to show me how she likes my style ….. so try to find something incommon with ur sister ( after all she’s ur twin) and practice it together( a certain sport can be good)…. show her that u love her and give her the warmth a sister could give her other sister… And don’t be frustrated when you fight because they say that if u dont fight with ur sibling, you don’t know him…..

    • mebulldogs

      I wonder if your relationship has been built on a pattern of tit-for-tat. You mention that you do a lot for her, but she does not reciprocate. While healthy relationships should approach a 50-50 give-and-take on average, from one time to the next that percentage can vary quite a bit. She may be unable to give to the relationship at the moment, and if the pattern includes score keeping, she may be unwilling to accept even your overtures of sisterhood, because she cannot reciprocate. And she does not owe you an explanation of why…. Cut her some slack. Rethink your approach to the relationship, and your motives for giving to her. If you can present a new style of interaction, without strings attached, you may find your sister’s moodiness disappears.

    • Ray Markd

      She sounds depressed. Maybe money problems, or something like that. Invite her out to dinner, your treat and after a glass of wine she may open up more.

    • Donna Feith

      (March issue) When family members send you photos, put them in an album and display it on your coffee table, in your bookcase, or someplace that appears easy to access. Be sure and tell them how much you enjoy looking at the album.