Picking the Right Dog for You

Don't wind up with a Fido that's a no-go. Find your perfect match, whether you want a dog that loves kids, hates strangers or keeps its hair to itself.

By Reader's Digest Editors
Picking the Right Dog for YouPhotodisc/Thinkstock

If you’re in the market for a dog, some breeds may be a better fit than others. And since taking home a new puppy that turns out to make you sneeze (or the neighbors yell) can be a heartbreaker, it’s worth doing a little research before you head to the pet store. Here are a few good choices based on different needs and preferences.

If you aren’t home a lot: Boston terriers, bull mastiffs, and chows are just a few of the breeds that don’t tend to get anxious when Master’s away, according to dogtime.com.

If you live in an apartment: City dwellers would do well to consider a dachshund, a French bulldog or an Italian greyhound, all of which are “quiet, low energy, fairly calm indoors, and polite with the other residents— good qualities in an apartment dog,” says dogtime.com.

If you’re allergic: Look for a non-shedding dog, like a Havanese, a Portuguese water dog or a standard poodle, advises dogbreedinfo.com. Though since allergies vary from person to person, “It is always wise to visit the dog before you commit.”

If you already own a dog: Bermese mountain dogs, cockapoos, and Labradoodles make good second bananas, as most get along with other dogs well, claims dogtime.com.

If you’ve got children: The top three breeds when it comes to kids are the poodle, the golden retriever and the Labrador retriever, says petmd.com. The latter in particular is “playful, patient, loving, protective, and reliable.” Find more good picks at petmd.com.

If you’re worried about intruders: Petrix.com lists Rottweilers, German shepherds and Scottish terriers as the top three watchdogs, and suggests 12 other good bets as well. “All these breeds are excitable and will bark vigorously at the presence of an intruder or in most situations that they think are out of the ordinary,” it states. Note to people with neighbors who tend to complain: These are not the breeds for you.

Sources: dogtime.com, dogbreedinfo.com, petmd.com, petrix.com

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