For the Fisherman: Baker Lake in Washington

from Off the Beaten Path | 318
Baker Lake, Washington© 2009 iStock/Robert KoopmansSockeye salmon are plentiful at man-made Baker Lake.

15 miles north of Concrete, on Baker Lake Rd., Washington

Here is the essence of the Pacific Northwest: a land of dense, dark green aromatic forests, snowcapped mountains, large lakes lying in wooded valleys, and highland lakes fed by glacial streams. Although Baker Lake and Lake Shannon are man-made (created by power-company dams), they sit beautifully and naturally at the base of majestic Mount Baker. At nine-mile-long Baker Lake, which is the more accessible, boating and fishing are the main activities; prior to July 5 each year it is plentifully stocked with rainbow trout. Baker Lake is also one of the state’s best sources of sockeye salmon.

Hikes range from short strolls to treks requiring several days into rugged backcountry and up the slopes of Mount Baker. Along the area’s eastern edge you can reach vast wilderness areas of North Cascades National Park.

For an introduction to the region’s plant life, take the Shadow of the Sentinels nature trail (near the main entrance highway), which has interpretive signs along the way. Some of the Douglas firs you will see along the trail are more than 600 years old. At the mouth of Swift Creek, near the north end of Baker Lake, agates and jaspers can be found. Several campgrounds are maintained along the access road. The area is heavily visited on summer weekends.

Access road open year-round, but check in winter for snow closings.

www.fs.fed.us/r6/mbs/about/mbrd.shtml

(360) 856-5700 Ext. 515