Worth a Visit in North Dakota: International Peace Garden

from Off the Beaten Path | 318

Hwy. 281, north of Dunseith, North Dakota

This 2,300-acre wooded garden commemorates the heartening fact that the boundary between the United States and Canada is the longest undefended international border in the world. On a monument marking the line, the two nations pledge that “as long as men shall live, we will not take up arms against one another.”

The garden, situated on land donated by North Dakota and the Canadian province of Manitoba and dedicated in 1932, was the inspiration of Henry Moore, a Canadian horticulturist. Moore’s dream of a garden symbolizing the human yearning for peace is beautifully realized here amid the rolling foothills of the Turtle Mountains.

International Peace Garden, North Dakota This serene site on the North Dakota—Manitoba border commemorates the goodwill between the United States and Canada.

Two automobile tours, each 3 1/2 miles long, have several stops for sightseeing and picnicking. The Canadian Natural Drive winds past Lake Stormon. At the start of the United States Cultural Drive is a 13-foot floral clock, which is one of the park’s most photographed features. This drive also leads to the park’s campground, International Music Camp, CCC Lodge, and the Legion Athletic Camp.

To enjoy the natural beauty more closely, one can take the 1 1/2-mile Lake View Hiking Trail, where beavers may be seen at work. Another walk of the same length goes through the well-tended formal gardens marking the nations’ boundary line in the center of the park, continuing on to the 120-foot Peace Tower. Also to be found on this walk is a September 11 peace memorial. Note that visitors need to have proper identification with them. U.S. citizens need their birth certificates or passports. Foreign visitors need their passports and any applicable visas

Open daily year-round. Admission charged.

www.peacegarden.com
(888) 432-6733

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