15 Animal Species So Gross, They’ll Make Your Skin Crawl

Lions and tigers and ... glowing roaches? Oh my.

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Glowing roach

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A new species of cockroach uses bacteria to glow in the dark, as reported in Time.com, Great — now we'll be able to hear and see creepy crawlies scuttling away in the night (said no person ever!). And if you think that's as funny as it is disgusting, these animal jokes will really get you ROLFing.

Carnivorous sponge

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These sponges use their hooked appendages to grab passing sea creatures, enclose them in a thin membrane (think: spider's web), then devour them, Livescience.com reports. So better, double-check your loofa... some animal species are a lot smarter than you think.

Mind-control fungus

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If the Jedi mind trick is your fantasy superhero power, you might find yourself envying this fungus. The Brazilian species makes its home in an ant’s brain, and NationalGeographic.com reports that it controls the ant until it kills it off, then it takes its spores elsewhere. If the mere thought of that threw you into a dark mood, make your brain happy with these animal cartoons.

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Tiniest chameleon

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This tiny chameleon sub-species called a Brookesia marca is small enough to rest comfortably on the tip of a match. No worries; you aren't likely to encounter one. The mini reptile is at risk, due to deforestation and general habitat loss, reports LiveScience.com. These animal stories prove that sometimes, they're just like humans.

Snub-nosed monkey

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Is that a monkey … or Voldemort? Either way, you wouldn't want to run into one of these in the darkest jungle. Or maybe you do? According to Wired.co.uk, these critically endangered snub-nosed monkeys from Myanmar tend to get water in their nose when it rains, so do what researchers do and locate them by their sneezes.

Transparent shell snail

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Nearly one thousand kilometers (about 609 miles) below sea level in a Croatian cave system, scientists discovered a creepy snail that has a translucent shell. Good luck trying to find one, though. Even if you could dive deep enough, the creatures are as tiny as they are rare. Though the cave was home to many types of snails, scientists only recovered one specimen of this species. This is how much sleep some cute animals need.

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Eyelash-winged wasp

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Tinkerbella, aptly named after the pert fairy in "Peter Pan," is a species of wasp known for its distinct wings, which resemble eyelashes. According to ScienceDaily.com, a group of scientists exploring Costa Rica identified the tiny wasp in 2013.

Skeleton shrimp

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Tiny and rare, this skeletal-looking translucent shrimp has only been seen in caves off the coast of Southern California, according to CNN.com. Read these stories of unexpected animal heroes.

Elephant shrew

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Although they may appear like everyday mice, the DNA of the elephant shrew is more closely related to its jumbo namesake. Despite being smaller than even other elephant shrew species, the mammal genetically resembles an elephant way more than a mouse, according to the African Wildlife Foundation.

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Leaf deer

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Smaller than a standard beagle, the average adult leaf deer weighs about 25 pounds and measures about 8 inches tall. Its name came about because Myanmar locals claim it is so small that it can be wrapped in just one large leaf, reports The New York Times.

Flapjack octopus

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This little octopus is only 7 inches long. Though discovered in 1990, researchers are still studying it's living patterns. It has smalls wing-like fins and is adorable according to Inquisitr. We have to agree.

Enigma moth

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This new species of moth was only recently discovered. They are so unique because they only live for one day. Within 24 hours, they emerge from their cocoon, mate, reproduce, and then die. IFL Science describes it as an evolutionary wonder.

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Stick bug

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The stick bug is over a foot long, which makes it the second-biggest living insect ever found. It was discovered in 2014 in Vietnam.

Massive eel

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This eel is the largest of its kind. It's scientific name is Pylorobranchus hearstorum, or worm eel, and it was first discovered in 2014. It measures 50 inches long from head to tail, which is about twice as long as every other type of eel worm.

 Fanged frogsCreepy,-Crawly,-Slimy-Animal-Species-That-Will-Leave-Your-Skin-CrawlingTatiana Ayazo/Rd.com, shutterstock

The Limnonectes larvaepartus is a frog with fangs that was discovered in 2014. It has two projections on its lower jaw that make great defensive weapons. The species gives birth to live tadpoles, then uses its fangs to fight off predators.


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