The Simple Math of Being Healthy | Reader's Digest

The Simple Math of Being Healthy

From research labs around the world, here are the simple additions and subtractions that result in a healthier life.

from Reader's Digest

ADD

Walking and biking. As few as five minutes of outdoor exercise substantially raises your mood and self-esteem, a review of ten studies shows. (Need more motivation? Other recent research indicates that walking 30 minutes a day lowers a man’s risk of problems in bed.)

Eggs. You’ll eat less at lunch after an egg-heavy breakfast than after a carb-packed morning meal, a recent trial suggests. In fact, your calorie consumption during the day could drop 18 percent.

Nuts. About two and a half ounces a day can significantly lower your cholesterol—especially if your “bad” cholesterol is high— and make you less likely to develop diabetes. (Stick to dry-roasted or raw nuts.)

The Simple Math of Being Healthy

SUBTRACT

Pill popping. Scientists once thought selenium supplements might cut the risk of lung and prostate cancers. But last year, a major study dashed such hopes for prostate cancer—and now decades-long research shows no lung cancer protection.

Hesitation. If you suspect a family member or a friend is having a stroke, don’t wait—phone 911. A survey shows many people would delay making the call or would even drive a sufferer to the emergency room—a slower and more dangerous strategy.

Hamburgers. Kids who eat three or more burgers per week are about 40 percent more likely to be diagnosed with asthma than kids who never or rarely eat burgers, according to a recent study of more than 50,000 children in 20 countries.