Be a Rebel! It’s Banned Books Week

By Diane Dragan

The Grand Central Library window (left) says it best: This week, fight against censorship and enjoy your freedom to read what you want. If you think that banning books is something that happened only in the past—or in other countries—take a look.

Top 100 Banned or Challenged Books from 2000-2009: includes recent best-sellers like The Lovely Bones (#74), Snow Falling on Cedars (#33), and the Harry Potter series (#1). Here are the reasons why.

Top 100 Banned or Challenged Books from 1999-2000: includes many tween or teen titles like S.E. Hinton’s That Was Then, This Is Now (#97), To Kill a Mockingbird (#40), and A Wrinkle in Time (#23). But it also includes other popular works for more mature audiences.

Banned and Challenged Classics: What’s on the list for canon literature that, at some point, was not on the shelves for all to read?
1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger

3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck

4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

5. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker

6. Ulysses, by James Joyce

7. Beloved, by Toni Morrison

8. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding

9. 1984, by George Orwell

11. Lolita, by Vladmir Nabokov

12. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck

15. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller

16. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

17. Animal Farm, by George Orwell

18. The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway

19. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner

20. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway

From Aristophanes to Jackie Collins: Wikipedia’s list of books banned, at one point or another, by various governments.

•Also fun: Huffington Post looks at The 11 Most Surprising Banned Books and 11points.com the 11 Most Ironically Banned Books of All Time. And from Time, Free eBooks for Banned Book Week.

Dig out your library card, charge up your eReader, and join in.

Become more interesting every week!

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