6 Things Not Worth the Money

Are you a smart spender or are you unknowingly wasting money? Here, a list of 6 things you should just stop buying now. Really, they're not worth the money.

By Reader's Digest Editors
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    1. Credit card payment insurance

    For a monthly fee, many credit card companies offer an optional insurance policy: they’ll cover your payments if you become disabled or unemployed. Financial advisors explain that most of these programs are rife with complex rules and restrictions, and recommend using the money you would have spent on insurance to pay down your balance instead.

    2. Premium gas

    You may think that filling your tank with premium rather than regular will help your car run better and longer, but according to Car and Driver magazine, you’d be wrong. A recent study by the magazine revealed that high-octane gasoline had no effect, except on ultra-high performance vehicles.

    3. Unlimited cell-phone minutes

    You may think you need a cell phone plan with unlimited minutes, so you have the freedom to talk as much as you like without incurring extra fees. But most people don’t exceed the number of minutes offered in even the least expensive plans from most carriers (about 700 per month for a family plan). Check your usage amount on bills for the past several months before choosing a pricier plan.

    4. Automobile service warranties

    The manufacturer warranty you get when you purchase or lease your car is legit. The one you’re offered via a postcard in the mail, in all likelihood, is not. According to an investigation by the Better Business Bureau of St. Louis (home to several warranty companies), nearly $3 million in repairs that should have been covered according to contracts were not. What’s more, over 90% of those who purchased such insurance found the process to be "misleading or improper."

    5. Bottled water

    Contrary to what most bottled water producers would like you to think, much of what they’re bottling came straight from a tap rather than a spring or well. Using a water filter will give you similar results for a fraction of the price. It’s also kinder to the planet -- most plastic water bottles end up in landfills, rather than at recycling facilities.

    6. Lottery Tickets

    Yes, $10 million probably will make your life wonderful, but almost anything is more likely to happen than you winning the lottery. The chance of winning most big-ticket lottery jackpots is well over 100 million to one. Source: Moneyland

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    Your Comments

    • MBlack

      You can’t win the lottery if you don’t play. Also, once the jackpots gets to 300M+ then you are actually getting very good pot odds.

    • RegularJoe62

      Is saving a dollar or two per week on lottery tickets the best they can come up with here? Most people that buy them do understand they have no real chance of winning. It’s just cheap entertainment. I was hoping for something more useful.

    • Corporate Racism

      Can we include our Government on this list of things not worth the money we’re paying???!!!!!

      • RabidRepublican

        As the old saying goes… “Just be glad you’re not getting all the government you’re paying for!”

      • MBlack

        OH S N A P !!!

    • drkennethnoisewater

      If your car’s manual recommends a particular grade of gasoline, use it. Otherwise, it’s pretty much a waste to go higher than 87.

    • Sammy Z

      High Octane gas isn’t a rip-off if your car was designed to run on High Octane gas. In that instance, running anything less is risking damaging your engine internals.

      • EnjoyingTheView

        Which is why the article plainly stated “except on ultra-high performance vehicles.” DUH! Learn to read…

        • Sammy Z

          Don’t be such an A. The term “ultra-high performance” is relative. The Subaru BRZ has a 2.0 liter, direct injection engine pumping out an “Ultra-High Performance” rating of 200hp and a blistering 151lbs of torque, yet it requires premium fuel. The Genesis coupe, on the other hand, has a power rating of 348HP with 300lbs of torque and it can run on regular. Does that mean the lower rated engine is more “Ultra-high performance?” It’s all relative jerk.

          • EnjoyingTheView

            Who is being an A ? You’re the one so full of yourself that you have attempted to point out errors that do not exist!
            YOU, my friend are the one being an A! Get over yourself dude!

            • Sammy Z

              For a second there, I had almost forgotten that this was the internet. “The only way to win, is not to play.”

              Good day sir.

            • btldriver

              Kudos on the “War Games” quote. A refreshing blast from the past.

            • Sammy Z

              Matthew Broderick in his prime. Ferris Bueller really needed to be in more movies.

        • drkennethnoisewater

          Vehicles other than “ultra-high performance vehicles” can require higher-grade fuels, learn to read manuals..

    • Jfr

      You fogot to list purchases from Publisher’s Clearing House that extract millions from the elderly every year.

    • Servison

      If I don’t use premium fuel, the engine light comes on. Codes say both manifold sensors . (toyota V-6)

      • Sammy Z

        Check your owner’s manual to verify which fuel octane you should be using. You can also ask your local Toyota service guy or check the fuel cap as it can be written there as well.

    • Carolyn Wilder

      I disagree..I was heading for a tune-up or whatever they call it these days.  Plugs, plug wires, etc.  I was figuring on 100-200$.  I was told that this is what I needed by my regular mechanic and also a second opinion by another mechanic.  My cousin who is a mechanic asked me how many miles a week I drive.  About 50-100…He told me I should be using hi test gas around town and mid grade for a road trip.  Since I started doing that I have no more skipping, going dead at stop signs or other engine problems.  I would advise your readers to try this remedy before spending a lot of money at the repair shop.

    • Carolyn Wilder

      I disagree..I was heading for a tune-up or whatever they call it these days.  Plugs, plug wires, etc.  I was figuring on 100-200$.  I was told that this is what I needed by my regular mechanic and also a second opinion by another mechanic.  My cousin who is a mechanic asked me how many miles a week I drive.  About 50-100…He told me I should be using hi test gas around town and mid grade for a road trip.  Since I started doing that I have no more skipping, going dead at stop signs or other engine problems.  I would advise your readers to try this remedy before spending a lot of money at the repair shop.

    • Carolyn Wilder

      I disagree..I was heading for a tune-up or whatever they call it these days.  Plugs, plug wires, etc.  I was figuring on 100-200$.  I was told that this is what I needed by my regular mechanic and also a second opinion by another mechanic.  My cousin who is a mechanic asked me how many miles a week I drive.  About 50-100…He told me I should be using hi test gas around town and mid grade for a road trip.  Since I started doing that I have no more skipping, going dead at stop signs or other engine problems.  I would advise your readers to try this remedy before spending a lot of money at the repair shop.

      • Sammy Z

        Unfortunately, it’s not so easy an issue to diagnose without knowing the car’s make/model plus seeing the wear level and how well the vehicle has been maintained.

        I still stand by, for the far majority of people using a well to ok maintained vehicle, if your car doesn’t require premium, don’t buy it. It’s a waste.

      • RegularJoe62

        The item on high octane gas was poorly stated. What it should have said instead of “ultra high performance vehicles” was that it shouldn’t be used unless the manufacturer recommends it. Some of those engines might not be considered “ultra high performance” by many people. And, as you’ve discovered, even for ordinary cars, your driving conditions may not be the same as for the average owner. Still, the general idea of the statement is correct. Most people that buy high octane gas don’t need it.