File Under Fuzzy: 5 Warm Christmas Gestures from Everyday Americans | Reader's Digest

File Under Fuzzy: 5 Warm Christmas Gestures from Everyday Americans

By Perri O. Blumberg

I can’t help but get that fuzzy feeling reading about these incredible holiday acts of kindness. What are the nicest gestures you’ve seen this year?

1. Grocer Joe Lueken, 70, donates his Minnesota supermarkets to his employees.

The owner of three grocery stores will spread holiday kindness by transferring ownership of his stores to his 400 or so employees despite buyout offers from numerous national chains. “My employees are largely responsible for any success I’ve had, and they deserve to get some of the benefits of that,” he told the Star Tribune. “You can’t always take. You also have to give back.”

2. Strangers turn $5 into $500 for a Louisville family in need.

A mere $5 is less than a sandwich combo, but the contagious kindness that spread throughout a Kmart parking lot raised $500 from a group of strangers who decided to start an effort on Facebook to help out a struggling family.

3. 9-Year-Olds from North Carolina give up Christmas gifts for Sandy victims.

When these young twin brothers learned of the impact of Superstorm Sandy, they decided to help. They used their Christmas money to purchase supplies and, with help from their grandmother, made 10 fleece blankets to distribute to hurricane victims.

4. Friends spread holiday spirit with toy dolls for kids with cancer in Michigan.

When former cancer patient Sarah Cromer, 21, heard about a new hairless doll line by American Girl Dolls, she wanted to get one as a holiday gift for children battling the illness. Her humble efforts turned into a full-fledged effort that donated 26 American Girl Dolls to the children’s oncology ward at Mott Children’s hospital.

5. Neighbors show the power of a community Christmas tree in storm-afflicted New Jersey.

In Union Beach, New Jersey, residents have turned a fallen Christmas tree into a valiant symbol of hope and strength. After a youth soccer coach  raised it in a vacant field, ornaments began to appear on the tree’s branches. Soon enough, the tree was covered in messages, lights and handmade decorations as neighbors came together to take solace in the power of community.