Here’s How to Keep a Cat from Scratching the Furniture

Check out these proven ways to keep your cat from scratching furniture.

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Does anyone remember the song Cat Scratch Fever, by Ted Nugent? It was released in 1977 and in 2009, VH1 named it the 32nd best rock song of all time. But, we digress. No matter how much you love your cat(s), if they are tearing up your furniture, it’s time to find a solution. We’re here to help. Here are 30 cat quotes every cat owner can appreciate.

Do all cats scratch furniture?

Scratching is a normal aspect of cat behavior. In the wild, cats scratch their claws to remove the dead layer of claw (think of it like a cat manicure), which helps to keep their claws sharp for hunting. Scratching also lets them mark their territory. They have scent glands between their claws and the scratch marks themselves are a visual sign to other cats that this area is occupied. Scratching and stretching also help them to keep their bodies in good shape.

So, your much-loved cat is simply being a cat. However, it’s not fun if they decide to leave their calling card on your furniture, drapes, or carpets. So here are some proven ways to keep a cat from scratching furniture.

Don’t declaw your cat

Declawing your cat is not recommended. It’s a surgical procedure that involves removing the last bone in each of your cat’s toes to prevent the claws from regrowing. It can lead to behavior problems such as biting and refusal to use a litter box. Scratching isn’t the only unusual behavior cats sometimes display—find out why cats knead.

Provide scratching posts

Kittens begin to scratch at around eight weeks old, so start training your cat when it’s young by providing scratching posts or stands. Your cat can still indulge in its natural behavior, but without shredding your furniture. And, here’s more awesome DIY cat furniture to entertain your cat.

Use cat scratch spray

Using a cat scratch spray will trick your cat into thinking that it has already marked its territory, discouraging it from scratching where you don’t want it to. You can purchase a spray to stop cats from scratching furniture, but it’s easy to make your own homemade cat scratching spray using vinegar, essential citrus oils, or even garlic and peppermint! And if you’re trying to keep your cat off your kitchen countertop, here are 10 ways to do it.

Use cat scratch tape

If you’re wondering how to stop cats from scratching leather furniture, then cat scratch tape is the answer. It also works well on fabric, carpet and hard surfaces such as walls and doors. This double-sided sticky tape comes in panels or rolls like regular tape, and can be stuck where you need it and removed easily afterward. Cats hate the feeling of stickiness on their paws, so it discourages scratching.

Try socks or nail caps

Cat socks (aka mittens) to prevent scratching are an alternative to declawing. These socks work well for some cats, but if yours gets frustrated and keeps removing them, try soft nail caps that glue onto your cat’s claws. These will limit the damage if your cat does decide to scratch where it shouldn’t. In case you’re wondering, here’s what catnip actually does to cats.

Protect with vinyl guards

Yet another option is to install clear vinyl panels on your furniture where your cat wants to scratch. These panels are available in many sizes and they come with screw pins that make the panels very easy to install.

So, while you might not be able to keep your cat from scratching furniture altogether, these tips can reduce the likelihood of damage to your home.

Can’t remember Cat Scratch Fever? You’re welcome.  And, if you’re still wondering why your cat behaves in a certain way, then look no further than these things your kitty would really love to tell you.

Originally Published on The Family Handyman

Elizabeth Manneh
Elizabeth is an experienced freelance writer, specializing in health & wellness, education & learning, family life & parenting, and women's issues. She's been published on Huffington Post, and was a regular contributor to Love Live Health and Daily Home Remedy. Elizabeth is a retired primary school principal and education consultant, with a continuing passion for education and learning. She's familiar with writing newsletters, reports to stakeholders, financial reports, business plans and evaluation reports.