Amazon Users, Don’t Fall For This Prime Day Email Scam

Beware—it’s a trap!

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Amazon Prime members have more to look out for than great deals and fast shipping. Some could soon become the victims of an elaborate e-mail scam.

An official-looking e-mail is currently targeting users of the worldwide retailer. The message thanks them for their recent purchase on Amazon Prime Day and invites them to write a review in exchange for a $50 prize. But, Prime members, beware! It’s not what it looks like.

According to consumer technology expert Kim Komando, who received the e-mail herself, the link will direct consumers to a fake Amazon site that requests their username and password. Clicking the link could invite a malware infection or ransomware onto your computer, which can then encrypt important files. Thankfully, this website can help you make a foolproof password that’s safe from hackers.


Amazon warns its users to always beware of suspicious e-mails and/or webpages that claim to be from them. Those scams often contain clues of their inauthenticity, including things like typos or grammatical errors or prompts to install software on your computer. Keep an eye out for other indicators like requests for your Amazon.com username and/or password, your payment information, or other personal info. And if you receive order confirmation for an item you didn’t purchase, that’s also a big red flag.

To determine if you’ve received one of these spam e-mails, double check the “from” line of the e-mail; an Internet Service Provider (ISP) other than @amazon.com could indicate it’s a fake. Beware of this viral social media hoax, as well.

Think the e-mail you received seems a little fishy? Don’t click! As soon as you can, contact Amazon at [email protected] with information about the e-mail you received. Delete the e-mail afterward—and learn how to avoid the most common online scams.

[Source: Woman’s Day]

Brooke Nelson
Brooke Nelson is a researcher at PBS FRONTLINE in Boston, Massachusetts, and writes regularly about travel, health, and culture news for Reader’s Digest. Previously she was a staff writer at Reader's Digest. Her articles have also appeared on MSN, Business Insider, and Yahoo Finance, among other sites. She earned a BA in international relations from Hendrix College. Follow her on Twitter @BrookeTNelson.