If You Get Mailed Gift Cards from “Jenny B,” Throw Them Out—It’s a Scam

Women across America are getting mail congratulating them on their pregnancy—but many of them aren't even expecting.

If you’re expecting a new baby, getting free coupons to help buy all of the things newborns need would be a huge help—but if you’re not expecting a baby, it’s a little creepy.

Thousands of women across the country have reported getting unexpected cards in the mail congratulating them on their pregnancy along with a variety of gift cards and coupons for items that will help Mom and baby. The cards are all signed by Jenny B, but no one knows who she is. Make sure to also watch out for these phone call scams that could steal your money.

jenny b gift card scamCourtesy Taylor Vargas
Taylor Vargas, from New York, documented her unexpected delivery on Instagram, and wrote “Seriously, who [is] expecting because I got over $250 worth of baby [gift cards] courtesy of Jenny B from Utah?”
The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers across the United States and Canada that they should be cautious of these hand-addressed letters. The company in charge of this questionable marketing scheme is Mother’s Lounge, LLC based out of Utah. The letter contains gift cards and coupons to different online retailers. It might seem like a nice gesture, but when customers tried to use the gift cards their shipping costs went way up. The BBB reached out to Mother’s Lounge’s owner, Jeanette Pierce—or Jenny B.— asking about the price increase, but never got a response. Those who decided to still go through with their order after the price increase reported getting lower quality products than expected or advertised.

Due to the many complaints about Mother’s Lounge LLC, which date back to February of 2019, the Better Business Bureau has given the company an F rating.

The BBB is unsure how the mailing list was generated, but the majority of women that received this letter are not expecting or even moms—and some men even got the letter. A lot of the women who aren’t pregnant have been posting the gift cards and coupons online asking if their friends know anyone who could benefit from them. If you see that or receive the letter yourself make sure to tell them that it’s a scam and to toss the letter in the trash. These are some other online scams that you should be aware of.

Morgan Cutolo
Morgan is the Assistant Digital Managing Editor at Reader’s Digest. She graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 2016 where she received her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. When she’s not writing for rd.com or keeping the 650+ pieces of content our team produces every month organized, she likes watching HGTV, going on Target runs, and searching through Instagram to find new corgi accounts to follow.