These Are the Most Attractive Words to Use on Your Online Dating Profile

There's a method to the madness of online dating.

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These days, more people than ever are canoodling via their computers. In fact, 15 percent of American adults—and more than 1 in 5 people in the 18 to 44-year-old range—report using at least one online dating site and/or mobile dating app, according to the Pew Research Center. With so much competition, how can you stand out from the crowd?

First of all, matchmakers say, these specific photos will take your online dating profile from drab to fab. And according to a recent survey by dating website eHarmony, using certain words to describe yourself is almost guaranteed to land you the first date, too. (You’re on your own for the second date, though.)

Data crunchers surveyed 12,000 dating profiles, using an algorithm to determine the descriptive words that make a potential love interest more likely to make a move. (But before you hit “Send,” check out the online dating opening lines that will get you the date—and the ones that won’t.)

Finding the word “ambitious” on a female’s dating profile made men 48 percent more likely to interact with her. “Perceptive” came in second place, with those using the word gaining 46 percent more interaction than daters who did not include it. The words “sweet” (33 percent), “hard-working” (32 percent), and “thoughtful” (28 percent) also sparked the would-be suitors’ interest.

As for the men? Dudes who used the words “physically fit” to describe themselves received 96 percent more interaction than those who did not use the words. Women also prefer men who are “perceptive” (51 percent), “spontaneous” (45 percent), “outgoing” (44 percent), and “optimistic” (39 percent), the survey found.

If any of these terms apply to you, add them to your bio ASAP. Who knows? Pretty soon, you could watch the messages roll in. Just be careful not to catfish—and if you don’t understand what that means, you might want to brush up on the online dating terms you need to know.

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Brooke Nelson
Brooke Nelson is a researcher at PBS FRONTLINE in Boston, Massachusetts, and writes regularly about travel, health, and culture news for Reader’s Digest. Previously she was a staff writer at Reader's Digest. Her articles have also appeared on MSN, Business Insider, and Yahoo Finance, among other sites. She earned a BA in international relations from Hendrix College. Follow her on Twitter @BrookeTNelson.