Tahquamenon Falls State Park in Michigan

Paradise, Michigan This nearly 50,000-acre park has three developed sections: the Upper Falls, the Lower Falls, and the Tahquamenon Rivermouth.

Tahquamenon Falls State Park, Michigan
The Lower Falls drop 22 feet in some places. When the Chippewa camped at Tahquamenon, they fished for walleye and hunted deer.

Paradise, Michigan

This nearly 50,000-acre park has three developed sections: the Upper Falls, the Lower Falls, and the Tahquamenon Rivermouth.

The Upper Falls are among the largest east of the Mississippi and are most easily approached by way of the Brink stairs, an elaborate series of observation decks that wind down to river level.

The 200-foot-wide lip of the falls, about 50 feet high, is a shallow S-curve of ancient sandstone over which the soft brown water, stained by its passage through cedar and hemlock swamps, pours at a rate of up to 50,000 gallons per second. The Gorge stairs downstream are steeper and longer but allow more complete views.

The Lower Falls, actually a series of falls, lie on either side of an island (reached by renting a rowboat) and can be seen from several viewing points. A half-mile boardwalk path through the forest leads to an observation platform offering close-up views of the water churning over the falls. Visitors can camp here or at Rivermouth, which also has swimming, a new picnic area, and a boat launch.

Open year-round. Admission charged.

http//www.michigandnr.com

(906) 492-3415

Did you know?
Tahquamenon Falls State Park is noted as being the setting for The Song of Hiawatha, an epic poem Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote in 1855, based on legends of the Ojibway tribe and their heroic leader Hiawatha.

Originally Published in Reader's Digest

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