Show This to Your Boss If You Want Some Work-At-Home Time

When a company in Singapore asked half of its employees work from home for two years, it changed their lives. Now it can change yours, too!

Dmytro Zinkevych/Shutterstock

Sure, everyone likes to have health insurance and vacation days. But the next time you land a new job, you should look into getting this incredible perk. (You’ll wish you had these mind-blowing job perks, too!)

According to Nicolas Bloom, a professor of economics at Stanford, working from home is no longer just a clever way to avoid getting any real work done. In fact, telecommuting can potentially have huge benefits for employee health and morale.

Why? In his TED Talk, Bloom cited a two-year study in which half of a Singapore company’s staff worked from home for four days a week, while the other half came into the office five days a week. With fewer distractions throughout the day, the employees who worked from home majorly boosted their productivity, reaching levels almost equivalent to an entire additional workday. (Here’s how to get more done when you work from home.)

Not only did these employees report feeling happier and healthier, but they also tended to stick around with the company. That turned into a win-win situation for the company, too, because it decreased expensive employee turnover as well as days off. Plus, they could grow without needing to add extra office space. What’s not to love?

The study’s results were so positive that the company has since launched a work-from-home policy throughout its office. But the company in Singapore isn’t the first to make this discovery. There’s an awesome reason why people in Sweden only work six hours per day. And according to a recent Gallup study, employees who work from home three to four days a week are more likely to “feel engaged” than people who report to the office each day. Tuning in to work from the comfort of your bed is sounding better and better.

Still stuck squirming in your cubicle? Here’s how you can boost your work energy—fast.

Brooke Nelson
Brooke Nelson is a researcher at PBS FRONTLINE in Boston, Massachusetts, and writes regularly about travel, health, and culture news for Reader’s Digest. Previously she was a staff writer at Reader's Digest. Her articles have also appeared on MSN, Business Insider, and Yahoo Finance, among other sites. She earned a BA in international relations from Hendrix College. Follow her on Twitter @BrookeTNelson.