12 Secret, Quirky Messages in Company Logos You See All the Time

What do Apple, Amazon, Baskin Robbins, and Toblerone have in common? Their logos each hide an unbelievable code.

Baskin Robbins

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: Who cares … it’s ice cream!

Wrong! While stuffing our faces, we missed the 31 in the initials, as in the number of flavors the company began offering in 1953—one for every day of the month. This is what popular company logos looked like when they first came out versus what they look like now.

Amazon

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: The grin under the letters amaz depicts CEO Jeff Bezos smiling at all the merchandise his company is moving.

Wrong! The arrow broadcasts the wide variety of stuff—from A to Z—to be had on Amazon. These are famous company names you're most likely pronouncing all wrong.

Apple

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: They ripped off the Bible, the bitten apple symbolizing the fruit from the tree of knowledge.

Wrong! The designer made the bite mark for scale, so that a smaller logo would still look like an apple and not a cherry. Learn the fascinating origins of these well-known companies.

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FedEx

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: Honestly, we thought it just read FedEx.

Wrong! Look again, in the space between the E and the x. Yeah, it’s an arrow pointing forward, perhaps to suggest speedy delivery.

Toblerone

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: Mmmmm … a mountain of chocolate …

Wrong! Hey, what’s that bear doing on the side of that mountain of chocolate? It’s the official symbol of the Swiss town of Bern, the original home of Toblerone.

Dell

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: The E was on its side because someone thought it looked nice.

Wrong! Michael Dell announced that the goal of his company was to “turn the world on its ear.” So it’s been said he started with an E.

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Wikipedia

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: The Wiki­pedia people were so busy collecting information, they forgot to finish their logo.

Wrong! The unfinished globe, made of puzzle pieces with characters from various languages, represents the “incomplete nature” of the company’s mission to be the go-to information portal—and the fact that a site built on user submissions can never be complete.

Sun Microsystems

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com

What We Thought: A lot of U’s, as in, “U should buy Sun products.”

Wrong! Turn the logo around, and the Sun is always there.

Tostitos

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com What We Thought: The dot over the i was used to give the logo a pop of color. Wrong! The dot over the i is actually a bowl of salsa. The two t's are people, and the yellow triangle in between them is a chip. It's supposed to represent people coming together to share a tasty snack.

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Goodwill

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com What We Thought: The logo contains a smiling face to let us know how good it feels to clean out your house and donate items you no longer use. Wrong! The face is actually just a larger version of the g in the word 'goodwill' that appears at the bottom of the logo.

Tour de France

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com What We Thought: The yellow circle represented the sun. Wrong! The yellow circle is actually a bicycle wheel. The "R" in tour is a person, and the "O" in tour is the back bicycle wheel.

London Symphony Orchestra

Secret,-Quirky-Messages-in-Company-Logos-You-See-EverywhereTatiana Ayazo /Rd.com What We Thought: The three letter abbreviation was written out in a fancy script font. Wrong! The logo not only is an abbreviation of the London Symphony Orchestra, but it also represent an orchestra conductor. The "L" and "O" are his arms.

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