Cook Perfect Eggs: 4 Breakfast Tricks You’ll Want to Use Over and Over

Cook better fried eggs, scrambled eggs, poached eggs, and omelets for a breakfast that starts your morning sunny side up.

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Fried eggs: Use mason jar rings

Andrew Purcell for Reader's Digest

For perfectly round fried eggs (handy for breakfast sandwiches), heat a pan and spritz Mason jar rings with cooking spray. Place the rings on the pan, and slowly drop one cracked egg into each of the rings. Cook for about 5 minutes for a medium yolk. Use tongs to remove the Mason jar rings, and serve.

Scrambled eggs: Add crème fraîche

Andrew Purcell for Reader's Digest, pan courtesy All-Clad

To cook scrambled eggs that aren’t too runny or too dry, heat a large pan over medium high and add a tablespoon of butter. Crack six eggs directly into the pan. Egg whites and yolks have distinct flavors, and whisking them may cause a loss in depth of flavor. Scramble for 1 minute, and then add a tablespoon of crème fraîche. Its fat makes eggs creamy and soft. Mix and continue to cook for another 30 seconds to 1 minute (total cooking time: 1½ to 2 minutes).

Poached eggs: Boil for 10 seconds

Andrew Purcell for Reader's Digest

 

Use a pin to make a small hole in the wide base of the eggshell. This punctures an air pocket that could otherwise expand and crack the egg during cooking. Boil the egg in its shell for 10 seconds to help it retain its shape once cracked (a method made famous by Julia Child). Remove the egg, and then bring the water to a simmer. Gently crack the egg and release it into the water. Poach the egg for 3 to 4 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a bowl of ice water for 30 seconds to stop the cooking.

Omelet: Scramble first

Andrew Purcell for Reader's Digest

Add a tablespoon of butter to a pan over medium heat. Crack three eggs. Scramble for about a minute and thirty seconds, adding 1 tablespoon of crème fraîche after a minute. Scrambling first evenly cooks the eggs, and creates a light and fluffy texture for your omelet. Add fillings and fold the omelet in half. Do not keep it over heat longer than two minutes.

Sources: Corey Siegel, corporate executive chef at Electrolux Professional, a professional cooking appliances company; onegoodthingbyjillee.com; foodnetwork.com; thekitchn.com; socialfoods.com 

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