Share on Facebook

6 Things to Cook in a Nonstick Frying Pan—And 4 Things Not To

Nonstick pans are invaluable for preparing certain dishes—find out when they should shine, and when they should remain on the shelf.

Fluffy scrambled eggsTaste of Home

A beloved cooking tool, nonstick pans have a place in many a home cook's heart for their even cooking and quick cleanup. However, nonstick pans are not a one-size-fits-all solution and should be used for quick-cook proteins for the best—and tastiest—results. Not sure where to begin? Check out this guide to every type of frying pan.

Appetizing frying pan full of sizzling rashers of bacon. Shot with Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III.RapidEye/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Works well: Bacon

Nothing compares to the smell of sizzling bacon in the morning, and a nonstick skillet will result in crispy, evenly-cooked pieces. With less cleanup, you'll be able to enjoy your bacon even on busy weekdays.

Photo showing two fried eggs that are being cooked in a greasy frying pan, as part of a full-English fried breakfast fry-up.mtreasure/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Works well: Eggs

You'll want a nonstick skillet on hand to take your breakfasts or brunches to the next level. Nonstick pans will guarantee fluffy omelets and the perfect scrambled eggs while making flipping frittatas painless. Just make sure you know if your nonstick cookware is safe to use.

Pancakes onto the pan. Concept of Cooking ingredients and method on white marble background, Dessert recipes and homemade.ossphotostock/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Works well: Pancakes

Proving that nonstick skillets are the king of breakfast prep, they'll also simplify and upgrade your pancake game. Heavier nonstick pans will work better in this case to ensure even cooking throughout and make a fluffy, delicious start to your morning. Learn the secret ingredient for the fluffiest pancakes.

bhofack2/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Works well: Delicate fish

Nonstick pans are perfect for hassle-free fish—including favorites like salmon and scallops, which have a tendency to make a mess. When using this type of pan, make sure the fish is patted dry and you preheat the pan for an evenly-cooked, crispy result. Learn the ways you might have been cooking fish wrong.

crepe with ingredientmargouillatphotos/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Works well: Crepes

Crepes, pancakes' delectable French cousin, are an ideal dish to cook in a nonstick skillet. Since they are thin and delicate, nonstick skillets will reduce the likelihood of them burning or sticking to the pan. This results in a perfect crepe each time, ready to be filled with fruit, cheese or your accompaniment of choice.

Photo of a grilled cheese sandwich cooking in a large frying pan.sumnersgraphicsinc/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Works well: Cheesy dishes

Gooey and decadent, cheesy dishes have a best friend with nonstick pans. Prepare grilled cheese or other cheese-rich dishes like quesadillas without worrying about the cheese sticking.

Vilnius, Lithuania - June 17, 2011: preparing of a homemade tomato sauce in a frying pan from fresh tomatoes.ARTindividual/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Doesn't work so well: Acidic Foods

When working with tomatoes or lemons, put away the nonstick cookware. Acidic foods like these will wear off the nonstick coating, making the pans age more quickly. Stainless steel is your best bet for dishes that feature these flavors. Here's more on the only types of cookware you should use.

Fried chicken breasts on vegetable oil, iron cast panBartosz Luczak/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Doesn't work so well: When Charring or Searing

When cooking meats, especially those like steak or chicken breast, nonstick won't give you the crispiness or all-over browning you're aiming for. Use a thin layer of oil on cast-iron or stainless steel pans for an evenly-cooked, delicious dinner. Here are more foods you should always cook in cast-iron pans.

Close-up of colorful goat stew in cooking pan on top of wooden table.Dan Totilca/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Doesn't work so well: Pan Sauces

While the coating on nonstick pans makes them optimal for reducing mess, it also prevents bits to brown at the bottom of the pan. These bits are essential for maximum flavor and richness in your sauces. By the way, here's why you shouldn't wash your hot pan in cold water. 

Skillet with butter melting in it.DNY59/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Doesn't work so well: Browning Butter

Nutty and toasty browned butter lends a delicious, rich flavor to sauces and baked goods, but you should bench your nonstick pan for this. A stainless steel pan will let you monitor the butter to make sure it doesn't burn, and will cook the butter evenly. Now, find out how to organize all of your pots and pans in your kitchen.

Originally Published on Taste of Home