That’s Outrageous!

19 Serious Court Cases With Hilarious Names

'Terrible v. Terrible.' 'Schmuck v. United States.' Sometimes, nobody wins.

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Batman v. Commissioner

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Texas farmer Ray Batman wanted to convert his farm into a family partnership by transferring some assets to his teenage son. The Commissioner of Internal Revenue said no, but Ray wasn’t getting the Bat signal and brought it up with the Court of Appeals. No luck for Batman. (Sadly, Batman is not one of the names that indicate you'll probably own a mansion someday.)

Schmuck v. United States

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This Supreme Court case upheld the mail fraud conviction of Mr. Wayne Schmuck of Harvard, Illinois. Schmuck's downfall may have been entrusting judgment to a jury of his peers. (The law is merciless — here's how a missing comma cost one company thousands of dollars.)

Death v. Graves

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Alan and Demetri Death sued Graves & Co. (among others) for crashing their vehicle into the Death family motorcycle. Fortunately, Death lived.

United States v. Forty-three Gallons of Whiskey

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This 1876 case was brought against a man alleged to be transporting whiskey across county lines with intent to sell to a tribe of Chippewa Indians—then a violation of trade and treaty laws. Sound dumb? Here is the most ridiculous law in every state.

South Dakota v. Fifteen Impounded Cats

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A woman nearly backed into a cop car because her rear window was obstructed by the 15 cats she had been living in her car with for several days. Cops seized the cats, and the woman appealed to the state Supreme Court to get them back. The Court found the cat seizure justified for the safety risk they posed to other drivers. (Add this to the list of reasons why you should never, ever sleep with your cat.)

Terrible v. Terrible

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Nevada couple Joseph and Elizabeth Terrible wanted a divorce for what an outsider might guess were obvious reasons.

Easter Seals Society for Crippled Children v. Playboy Enterprises

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Playboy used fake Mardi Gras parade footage (filmed for the Easter Seal Society’s annual telethon for crippled children) in an adult film. The Supreme Court found Playboy not guilty of copyright violation. In other news, you might be in copyright violation for using these 16 common words.

United States v. Forty Barrels and Twenty Kegs of Coca-Cola

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This was a federal suit in which the government tried to get Coca-Cola to remove caffeine from its product. One sip will tell you how that ended. (You'll cringe when you see these people try to tan their skin with Coca Cola.)

Robin Hood v. United States

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A plaintiff who called himself Robin Hood filed a complaint against the United States Government alleging violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (a.k.a. the RICO act, often used to bust organized crime leaders) on behalf of any citizens who had been “robbed by banks, attorneys, and the government they tried to support.” His case was dismissed.

The California Coalition of Undressed Performers v. Spearmint Rhino

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Four exotic dancers sued several adult clubs for violating Federal Labor Laws.

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