11 Unusual Ways to Soothe a Sunburn You Won’t Believe Actually Work

How far would you be willing to go to ease the pain of a nasty sunburn? By the looks of it, you might end up in a very unorthodox bathtub situation.

Soak in milk

milkSea Wave/Shutterstock"Soaking in milk will have a drawing effect on a burn—it's due to the pH, fat, and cold temperatures," says Francesca Fusco, MD of Wexler Dermatology in New York City. If you don't have enough milk handy to fill up an entire basin, simply soak a washcloth in a bowl of cool milk, then gently lay the milky compresses on the burnt areas of your body. The milk will help create a protein film along your skin that reduces heat, pain, and sensitivity. Want to avoid getting sunburned in the first place? Avoid these common sunblock mistakes.

Refrigerate a tub of Vaseline

vaselineKPG Payless/Shutterstock"When you have a sunburn, it is important to keep your skin well-hydrated and moisturized, as it will improve the pain and accelerate the healing process," says Samer Jaber, MD of Washington Square Dermatology in New York City. "A great trick is putting Vaseline in the refrigerator for a few minutes so it goes on cold. The cold will soothe your sunburn, and the Vaseline will help restore your skin barrier, improving the healing process." Find out the sunscreen myths that make dermatologists cringe.

Take an oatmeal bath

oatmealRegreto/ShutterstockOne of the worst side effects of a bad sunburn is the insatiable urge to itch peeling skin. To stop yourself and soothe the burn, run a lukewarm bath and add at least one cup of finely ground oats. Use your hand to swirl the water and distribute the oatmeal, then soak for 15 to 20 minutes. "Oatmeal is a humectant, meaning it helps moisturize skin, and it contains inflammation-quelling compounds," Ranella Hirsch, MD, a Boston-based dermatologist, told Prevention. You'll enjoy the itching relief so much that you'll probably want to repeat this oatmeal bath a few times a day.

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Create your own topical cream

aspirinPhotographee.eu/Shutterstock"For an isolated area like a finger or your lips, dissolve an Aspirin in a tablespoon of cool water and make a paste. Apply to the affected area," advises Dr. Fusco. (Be careful not to lick your lips because it's super bitter.) Rinse off the paste after allowing it to sit on the affected area for five minutes. While you're waiting for it to absorb, you could also take one of those aspirins to ease your pain and inflammation.

Use yogurt as an antibacterial cream

yogurtetorres/ShutterstockNever fret if you don't have aloe handy—there are plenty of kitchen ingredients that can work as highly effective substitutes. For example, plain Greek yogurt has been known to provide immediate coolness and hydration to burnt skin when applied topically. Further, the yogurt's antibacterial properties will help keep infections at bay on the area's you can't stop scratching.

Apple cider vinegar

applecidervinegarThamKC/ShutterstockApple cider vinegar is something of a miracle home remedy when it comes to rashes and burns. This is because, as an anti-fungal and antiseptic liquid, apple cider vinegar can be used to detoxify your skin. Simply dab a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar onto your sunburn (do this directly or using a cotton ball). It will not only clean the problem area, but also rehydrate the skin by restoring your pH levels.

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Press tea bags onto your burn

teabageriyalim/Shutterstock"Tea acts as a classic, old-fashioned poultice with known anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that helps the skin heal and feel better faster," Jessica Krant, MD. a dermatologist in New York City, told Real Simple. As such, you can brew chamomile tea, thoroughly chill it, then use the tea bags or a towel compress to apply it to your burn.

Bust open a few vitamin E capsules

viatmineFarion O/ShutterstockDesperate times call for desperate measures, so we won't judge you for breaking open your vitamin E supplements and slathering their contents all over your skin. Why would you ever do this, you ask? Well, sunburns are painful because UV rays have produced free radicals in your body. To prevent these free radicals from stealing electrons from your healthy molecules, vitamin E can provide electrons for them, thus preventing your healthy molecules from depleting. You can take the vitamin E orally, but it's believed to be less effective than applying it straight onto your body.

Honey

honeyVlad Ozerov/ShutterstockParents suggests treating your burn by using organic honey as a natural salve. "Studies suggest it may work better than some antibiotic creams at speeding up healing, reducing infection, and minimizing pain," says Kathi Kemper, MD, author of The Holistic Pediatrician.

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Take a baking soda bath

bakingsodaflorin oprea/ShutterstockBy now you may be noticing a trend, and it's that soaking is generally a great way to heal and moisturize your burn. One way to accomplish this is to take a baking soda bath. Baking soda might sound a bit too harsh for your skin, but it will actually do an excellent job of reducing itching and improving inflammation. Just pour a cup or two of the powder into a tepid bath, then soak until the water turns cold.

Create a cucumber paste

cucumberDesignsstock/ShutterstockCucumbers are anti-inflammatory (hence why we wear them on our puffy eyes), they contain natural antioxidants, and they have analgesic (pain-relieving) properties. To take advantage of these benefits, chill and then blend two cucumbers to make a raw paste. Apply the creamed cucumber to any burnt or peeling areas on your body to be soothed and more quickly healed.

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