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30 Simple Ways to Burn Fat Fast

Life's too short for diets. But burning fat? Everyone has time for that, especially when it's as easy as these expert tips.

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Get some fat at breakfast

Fat gets a bad rap because it's more calorie-dense than other nutients—nine calories a gram compared to four for protein and carbs. But emerging research indicates that healthy fats can help you feel full and stay that way; that means you'll eat less throughout the day.

A recent study in the journal Nature found that mice who were fed a breakfast in which 45 percent of the calories came from fat tended to burn more body fat over the next 24 hours than those who ate a meal that was only 20 percent fat. This is early research—it needs to be repeated in humans—but mono and polyunsaturated fats like those found in avocados and nuts do have plenty of health benefits when you eat them in moderation.

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Have some probiotics

A healthy GI tract is teeming with beneficial bacteria, and scientists are uncovering just how important those microbes are for keeping your weight under control. They've discovered that the strains of bacteria in the guts of thin people differ from those in obese folks, and there's evidence that certain types of probiotics may help aid weight loss by assisting with the regulation of appetite, fat storage, and other related metabolic functions. You can get probiotics from live culture yogurt and certain supplements. While popping a pill or eating yogurt won't magically shrink your waist, warns Ginger Hultin, RD, gut health is important. Read more about the weight loss benefits of probiotics.

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Cut back on alcohol

We call it a beer gut for a reason: Your body tends to prioritize getting rid of any alcohol in your system, so it targets those calories first, which may impede fat burning, explains Hultin. Alcohol also tends to be higher in calories (7 per gram), and its inhibition-dissolving tendencies may lead you to overeat. Lose the booze, and you'll likely lose more weight, too.

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Strength train

Most people think of cardio as a weight loss all-star, but you don't need to spend all day on the treadmill to slim down. In fact, you might want to concentrate your efforts in the weight room. Muscle is metabolically active tissue, which means that it burns calories even when you're not lifting; your body burns calories just to maintain muscle, so the more of it you have, the more calories you torch. You lose muscle mass naturally as you age, a process known as sarcopenia, which is why losing weight tends to get tougher the older you get. One study found that just ten weeks of resistance training increased resting metabolic rate (the number of calories your body burns when you're not doing anything) by 7 percent. Check out this simple strength training routine that challenges your entire body.

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Spend less time at the gym (really)

High-intensity interval training—HIIT—has gained a reputation as an efficient way to get fast results. This workout involves short (30 seconds to five minutes), vigorous bursts of activity interspersed with periods of rest for maximum results. Incorporating HIIT into your strength training may offer even more results, according to a recent study by the American Council on Exercise—the results suggest the combo may be even more effective in burning fat fast.

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Get enough zzzs

"Poor sleep quality or quantity can make it difficult to lose or even maintain your weight," says Darria Long Gillespie, MD, a clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine at The University of Tennessee. When you are sleep deprived, your body becomes less sensitive to the effects of leptin, the hormone that usually signals that you've had enough to eat. At the same time, the amount of the hunger hormone, ghrelin, increases, so you want to eat more. Together, it's a recipe for overeating.

On average, Gillespie says, people need seven to nine hours of shuteye a night. If you're getting consistently less than that, you could be suffering the effects of sleep deprivation. Here's the exact amount of sleep you need to burn fat fast.

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Don't sleep like a baby

Sleep quality matters as much as quantity, according to Gillespie. In general, an uninterrupted seven hours is better than 12 hours of tossing and turning. Of course, for new moms or others for whom sleep is hard to come by, naps are better than nothing. But if it's possible to get your nightly sleep done in a solid block, that's your best bet, she says.

Good sleep hygiene can help. "Our ancestors needed to sleep when it was dark, quiet, and cool, Gillespie says. "That meant it was safe." Despite technological advancements like heat and air conditioning, our bodies still crave those cave-like conditions. Draw the blinds, use a white noise generator, and keep the thermostat set between 63 and 68 degrees.

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Go to bed early and be consistent

There's mounting evidence that our body's natural internal clocks, or circadian rhythms, drive a lot of our biological processes, including weight maintenance. They tend to sync up with daylight. That could be why studies have shown that shift workers tend to have a higher rate of obesity and weight gain—their body clocks are out of sync. One study even found that a third of people who experienced an interrupted sleep cycle for less than two weeks became prediabetic; all of the poor sleepers saw markers for the risk of obesity and type two diabetes climb.

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Power down devices

Another thing that messes with circadian rhythms? The blue light of digital devices. "We have seen increasing scientific evidence that the more you use devices, the higher your risk of obesity," says Gillespie. The reason is twofold: One, the more time you spend in front of a screen, the less time you're running around and playing. But also, experts believe, the blue light these devices emit can disrupt your internal clock. One study found that using a blue light-emitting device before bed delayed the release of melatonin, a hormone responsible for sleep, and the effect carried over to the following night as well.

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Don't forget to fuel up

It's a little counterintuitive, but consuming calories after you've just burned them appears to be vital to fat-burning. Your muscles need a combo of protein and carbs to replenish energy stores and build new muscle. In one study, people who downed a 270-calorie shake with 24 grams of protein and 36 grams of carbs after their workout lost about four more pounds of fat and built more lean muscle than those who didn't refuel post-exercise. Eating protein after a workout may help with lean muscle gains and could also help to prevent overeating later in the day, says Lesli Bonci, RD, a nutritionist and owner of Active Eating Advice. Find out what fitness instructors eat post-workout.

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