15 Great Reasons to Take a 15-Minute Walk

There's not much that a little stroll can't fix.

Previous
1/15 View as List
Next

Walking benefit: Instant happiness

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Whether you're just having a down day or a down life, taking a walk can instantly lift your mood—especially when you go outdoors. Not only can walking make you less depressed but according to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, depression sufferers who took a daily walk showed just as much improvement in their symptoms as people on medication. In fact, 60 to 70 percent of the subjects could no longer even be classified as depressed. And a follow-up study found that the mood boost from the walk lasted longer than that of the medication.  Here are other ways to relieve depression naturally.

Walking benefit: Off-the-charts creativity

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Stumped for an idea? Take a quick stroll around the block. Whether you need a solution to a problem at work or you're looking for inspiration for your novel, walking gets your creative juices flowing in all areas. A recent study published in Frontiers in Neuroscience found that walking improved both convergent and divergent thinking, the two types associated with enhanced creativity.

Walking benefit: Allergies be gone

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Sidelined by sneezing, sniffling and itchy, watery eyes, thanks to all the pollen in the air? Your instinct may be to close all the windows and hide until winter, but your instinct might be wrong. According to a Thai study, researchers found that walking or running—even for just 15 minutes—can reduce sneezing, itching, congestion and runny nose by up to 70 percent. Don't miss these other natural allergy relievers.

Walking benefit: Metabolism to the max

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Metabolic syndrome—the evil trifecta of increased blood pressure/cholesterol, high blood sugar, and fat around your waist—is one of the worst side effects of our sedentary lifestyle. It signals diabetes, heart disease, and even early death. But we have an old-fashioned cure to this modern-day disease: exercise. Any cardio exercise, including walking, can stop metabolic syndrome and even reverse the damage, according to a study published in Circulation. But intensity is the key to revving up your metabolism. Rather than just taking a leisurely stroll, try alternating walking fast and slow.  Here are other ways to walk off weight.

Walking benefit: Seven. Extra. Years.

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Want to live longer? Walk. Research has shown that you can add up to seven years to your life by exercising daily, regardless of what you weigh. Even better, those extra years will be good ones as folks who walk are more happy. A separate study found that people who exercise report feeling happier, more excited, and more enthusiastic about their future than their couch-potato brothers.  Don't miss these other habits that help you live a long and vital life.

Walking benefit: Cash in the bank

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Fitness can be pricey! Money for a gym membership, home exercise equipment, workout clothes, and shoes adds up fast. But it doesn't have to. Walking needs absolutely nothing to do it—even shoes are optional!—but still provides great health benefits. And not only does it save you money on things but it also saves you money in healthcare. Experts at Harvard estimate that for each dollar spent on preventative health, including time spent walking, you save $2.71 in future health costs.

Walking benefit: Nature's anti-wrinkle cream

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

The fountain of youth exists—but you're going to have to walk to find it. And we mean that literally. People who walk regularly not only look younger than their age (as long as you're remembering your sunscreen!) but they may also be younger on a cellular level, according to research published in PLOS One. The scientists found that cardiovascular exercise, like walking, can preserve or even lengthen your telomeres, the parts of our DNA that shorten as we age. Who's worried about wrinkles now? Here are more tricks that dermatologists use to keep skin young.

Walking benefit: Zzzzzzzzzz....

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Getting a solid eight hours snoozing in the sack is one of the most important things you can do for your health. But sometimes that's easier said than done. Thankfully a brisk walk is basically Ambien, minus the pill (and the scary sleep-walking stories). In a large meta-analysis of sleep studies, researchers found that regular walkers had longer and better quality sleep. And for those unlucky few who still had insomnia? Walking helped reduce the number of sleepless nights they experienced. These tips from sleep doctors will also help you sleep better.

Walking benefit: Keep calm and carry on

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

Raise your hand if you're stressed out. Okay, okay, put both your hands back down. Most of us swim in a pool of stress every day and that takes a serious toll on our mental and physical health.  But science says that walking is one of the fastest, most effective ways to calm down. Moving clears cortisol, the "stress hormone", out of your system and also helps stop the never-ending stream of worries going through your mind, according to a study published in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Walking benefit: Banish brain drain

Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock/Ivanko_Brnjakovic

It's official: Walking is as good for your brain as it is for your body. A comprehensive study of the effects of exercise on the brain found that it benefits all aspects of your mind including memory, cognition, learning, reading and it even increases the size of your brain to boot. Even better, walking protects your brain by lessening your risk of getting cognitive illnesses like Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

Previous
1/15 View as List
Next

Want to stay smart and healthy?

Get our weekly Health Reads newsletter

how we use your e-mail
We will use your email address to send you this newsletter. For more information please read our privacy policy.