6 Impressive Health Benefits of Chia Seeds

These tiny ancient seeds, favored by the Aztecs and Mayans (the word means "strength" in their language), provide major nutrients with minimal calories.

Chia seeds control appetite

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Chia seeds contain 11 grams of fiber per ounce—that's 42 percent of your recommended daily value in just one serving! How it works: Chia expands in your gut, curbing your appetite. Add to a breakfast smoothie or yogurt to feel fuller longer. Dr. Oz recommends stirring two tablespoons of chia seeds into a glass of water to ward off afternoon cravings.

Chia seeds support strong bones

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One ounce of chia seeds also delivers 18 percent of the recommended daily value of calcium. If you're lactose intolerant or aren't a big milk drinker, these little seeds can help provide the calcium your bones need to stay strong and prevent osteoporosis, according to Dr. Oz.

Chia seeds may help you sleep

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Chia seeds are tiny bundles of tryptophan, according to sharecare.com, and that amino acid raises melatonin and serotonin levels. These are the hormones that support stable sleep.

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Chia seeds help control blood sugar

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Chia seeds' high fiber content slows the conversion of carbohydrates to sugar and of sugar to fat during digestion, as per diabeticconnect.com. This helps keep blood sugar levels steady.

Chia seeds moisturize the skin

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Chia seeds are also available in serum form. Nicholas Perricone, MD, suggests applying it directly to dry skin or cuticles for immediate relief. You can also add a few drops to your regular lotion for extra moisturizing power. The high omega-3 content means chia seeds have anti-inflammatory properties, which can diminish redness and revive dry skin. 

Chia seeds protect the heart

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Chia seeds are packed with omega-3 fatty acids, even more than flax seeds and salmon, and this healthy fat is key to a healthy heart. High blood fat levels increases your risk of developing heart disease, and omega-3s have been shown to lower triglyceride levels. 

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