7 Reasons You Can Probably Get Away With Showering Less

Two in three Americans shower once a day or more, according to a YouGov poll. Here’s why you might be better off showering less frequently (and here are other ways you might be showering wrong).

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You're not as dirty as you think

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Daily showers are best for people with physically demanding jobs, those who live in hot, humid climates, or people prone to sweating. But if you don’t sweat that often, you could probably go two to three days without stepping into the shower, dermatologist Monika G. Kiripolsky, MD, told Men's Health.

It's making your skin itchy, red, and dry

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Your skin, the body's largest organ, serves a critical immune function as your body's protective barrier. Showering too often, especially during cold, dry winter months, weakens this barrier and makes your skin more vulnerable to irritation. "The soap and the hot water dissolve the lipids in the skin and scrubbing only hastens the process. The more showers you take, the more frequently this damage takes place and the less time your skin has to repair itself through natural oil production," according to HowStuffWorks.com. And that tight, after-shower feeling you get? It's not a sign of cleanliness, Casey Carlos, assistant professor of medicine in the division of dermatology at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, told Today.com. "It means your skin is too dry."

Towel drying also takes a toll on your skin

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Drying off with a towel can further aggravate your delicate birthday suit. It’s best to air dry, according to HowStuffWorks.com, but if that takes too long or you don’t like leaving wet foot prints all over the house, use a soft towel and gently pat your skin dry instead of vigorously rubbing it.

You only really need to wash your smelly parts

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If the thought of showering every other day or a few times a week makes your skin crawl, consider a mini cleanse. Rub your chest, armpits, and genitals with a washcloth and a mild cleaner, Men's Health advises.

Showering gets rid of good bacteria

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Right now, your skin is teeming with good bacteria, but showering launches these microbes into the air. They’ll repopulate, but there’s no good reason to get rid of them on a daily basis, according to this blog post on PLOS.org.

You’re making your hair frizz

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Fine hair can withstand daily washing, but those with thick, dry, curly, or textured hair may be prone to breaking and frizz if you lather up too often. "Shampoo traps oils, so if you do it too frequently, you may dry your hair out, leaving it prone to breakage," Angela Lamb, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, told WebMD.

"For a lot of hair textures, the cleaner it is, the more unruly it is," Michael Forrey, creative director of Sassoon Salon in New York City, told Women's Health. Frequent shampooing can also dull your hair color if you dye.

According to WebMD, only a small group needs to shampoo daily, like those with very fine hair, someone who exercises a lot (and sweats), or someone living in very humid place.

You'll save on water consumption

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Showers are typically the third largest water guzzler in the average home (after toilets and clothes washers). The average American shower uses 17.2 gallons and lasts for 8.2 minutes at average flow rate of 2.1 gallons per minute, according to Home Water Works, part of the Alliance for Water Efficiency. Cut back to three or four showers a week from seven (per person in your home!) and that could make a decent dent in your water bill.

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