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Can You Guess the Name of These British Foods?

Winner of this quiz takes the crown!

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TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS TRIFLECKP1001/Shutterstock

Food 1

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This layered dessert has been referenced in history as early as the 16th Century.

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TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS TRIFLECKP1001/Shutterstock

Answer: Trifle

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Making trifles in the Victorian era was a way to use leftover sponge cake and cream, novelist Elizabeth Jane Howard told the New York Times.

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chip buttyMartin Lee/REX/Shutterstock

Food 2

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Essentially this meal is a French fry sandwich. It’s even considered one of the best sandwiches from around the world.

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chip buttyMartin Lee/REX/Shutterstock

Answer: Chip butty

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You can dress your chip butty with ketchup, baked beans, or leave it naked with just some buttered bread.

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AmarettiWoman's Weekly/REX/Shutterstock

Food 3

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This might look like an American’s Thanksgiving pumpkin pie, but it surely isn’t.

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AmarettiWoman's Weekly/REX/Shutterstock

Answer: Treacle tart

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A treacle tart is even one of Harry Potter’s favorite desserts, as we find out in the first book of the series.

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Steak & kidney pudding with peas and potatoesJoe Gough/Shutterstock

Food 4

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This famous British food often gets confused for being a pie. 

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Steak & kidney pudding with peas and potatoesJoe Gough/Shutterstock

Answer: Steak and kidney pudding

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Steak and kidney pudding was first brought to the table in the early 17th century after the pudding cloth was invented and took the place of containers made from cow stomach linings, according to The Telegraph. Check out more weird foods you won’t believe people actually eat in other countries.

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cod and chipsAlex Segre/Shutterstock

Food 5

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This is one of the most iconic British dishes out there. Pass the tartar sauce!

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cod and chipsAlex Segre/Shutterstock

Answer: Fish ‘n’ chips

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Chips are what we in the United States would call French fries. Here are more common foods that have different names in the U.K.

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CHRISTMAS PLUMB PUDDINGCKP1001/Shutterstock

Food 6

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It isn’t the holiday season without this delicious dessert.

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CHRISTMAS PLUMB PUDDINGCKP1001/Shutterstock

Answer: Christmas pudding

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Luckily, you don’t have to wait for Christmas to make this sweet.

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delicious toad in the hole into a baking dish close up on the table. horizontalAS Food studio/Shutterstock

Food 7

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This sausage and Yorkshire pudding meal has a name that sounds like it could be a children’s book title!

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delicious toad in the hole into a baking dish close up on the table. horizontalAS Food studio/Shutterstock

Answer: Toad in the hole

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There are various stories about the origins of this creative name, but it can be agreed on that the dish was created at least in the early 18th century, the Telegraph reports.

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Baked Irish pie with minced meat on a plateKonstantin Kopachinsky/Shutterstock

Food 8

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Nope, this isn’t a cottage pie; that has beef inside. This type of pie actually has lamb. 

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Baked Irish pie with minced meat on a plateKonstantin Kopachinsky/Shutterstock

Answer: Shepherd’s pie

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It takes a a true English chef to make sure that you have the perfect crust and never too much meat or potatoes in your pie. Of course, that’s not quite how Americans picture a pie. Check out these 10 other words that have completely different meanings in each country.

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Classic british summer dessert called Eton Mess. Strawberries, crushed meringue and whipped cream in jarYulia Grigoryeva/Shutterstock

Food 9

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Putting together lots of whipped cream, meringue, and strawberries can get a little messy

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Classic british summer dessert called Eton Mess. Strawberries, crushed meringue and whipped cream in jarYulia Grigoryeva/Shutterstock

Answer: Eton mess

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The story goes that strawberry, meringue, and cream pudding were dropped during a cricket match between Eton College and Harrow College, and it was scooped off the floor and served in smashed bits so the food wouldn’t be wasted. There are other stories about this dessert’s origins, but this one is the most well-known—and hilarious. These are the top British phrases that always confuse Americans.

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Freshly cooked Yorkshire Puddings for a Sunday roast dinner. British, English cuisine.Duncan Andison/Shutterstock

Food 10

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This favorite English bakery item is made simply of egg, flour, and milk

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Freshly cooked Yorkshire Puddings for a Sunday roast dinner. British, English cuisine.Duncan Andison/Shutterstock

Answer: Yorkshire pudding

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Believe it or not, this pastry was originally filled with meat until the late 18th century.

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DigestiveTony Buckingham/REX/Shutterstock

Food 11

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This little biscuit is over a century year old and still loved by everyone. Legend says that they were made to help digestion, but that might not be so true now.

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DigestiveTony Buckingham/REX/Shutterstock

Answer: Digestives

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Even if they don’t help digestion, they are a tasty snack that are perfect for anyone on-the-go.

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Bangers and mash food photography recipe ideaRawpixel.com/Shutterstock

Food 12

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This popular dinner meal is favored not only in Great Britain, but also in Ireland. The sausages can be made of either pork, lamb, or beef.

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Bangers and mash food photography recipe ideaRawpixel.com/Shutterstock

Answer: Bangers and mash

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Calling sausages “bangers” might seem strange, but during the Victorian era, people called them “little bags of mystery,” because they were suspicious of what the sausage was made of. Here are more popular British words and phrases everyone should know.

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Fruit scone with raspberry jam and creamMaria_OH/Shutterstock

Food 13

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This complementary tea snack is served best with cream and jam. 

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Fruit scone with raspberry jam and creamMaria_OH/Shutterstock

Answer: Scone

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But what should be spread on first? Looks like Queen Elizabeth II has weighed in on the topic, and at Buckingham Palace, jam always goes on first. On the other hand, these are the 9 foods Queen Elizabeth never eats.

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Old fashioned English hard toffeeD. Pimborough/Shutterstock

Food 14

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Made with lots of butter, this sticky and chewy sweet has been an English favorite for centuries.

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Old fashioned English hard toffeeD. Pimborough/Shutterstock

Answer: Toffee

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Be careful how many pieces you eat, though; you don’t want to end up in the dentist’s chair!

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MADEIRA CAKECKP1001/Shutterstock

Food 15

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Here’s a hint: This fluffy dessert shares the same name as the British currency.

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Answer: Pound cake

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Next, find out the 13 foods Queen Elizabeth eats every day.