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Can You Guess the Disney Villain by Their Last Words?

Memorable Disney-verse villains have a lot in common—grade-A grudge holding, diabolical plans for revenge or undeserved reward, evil cackles, a flair for style or lair decorating, and ultimately a doomed destiny. Most also usually get one last bit of dialogue before their undoing whether it's a repeat of their catchphrase, one last threat, or a sassy bon mot.

I will get your sonNicole Fornabaio/rd.com

I will get your son!

“This isn’t the end of it! I will get your son eventually. I will get your son … oh no!”

Making threats until the bitter end is Nemesis 101. Syndrome, the no-good ginger who tries to take down Pixar’s first family of crime-fighting, promises to get their powerful infant son Jack-Jack someday. Unfortunately for him, his turgidity gets taken out by the turbine of his own plane (off-screen of course) when Daddy Incredible tosses a car at him at his cape gets caught. (Extra satisfying because of an earlier discussion about the danger of such accessorizing.) The Incredibles, which was originally going to be called The Invincibles according to EpicDash, is filled with homages. The town they protect, Metroville, is a portmanteau of Superman cities Metropolis and Smallville. The jet that takes Mr. Incredible to the island is a reference to Aquaman’s enemy Black Manta. Syndrome was drawn by animators to look like writer/director Brad Bird.

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A bunch of animals

“You call yourselves men? I have seen more intelligent pieces of carpet.”

Guess Cruella De Vil was never told, “If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.” She screams insults at everyone around her when her plan to pilfer all the puppies in 101 Dalmatians foiled. The above burn is the last one De Vil (Glenn Close) pops off in live-action remake from 1996. She uses them on her incompetent co-conspirators in the live-action remake from 1996 as they are all hauled away in a police wagon. Of course, seconds later, karma strikes and she gets her comeuppance as she’s sprayed by a skunk she’s mistaken as one of her beloved fur accessories. She was voted the 39thgreatest villain of all time by the American Film Institute in 2003. Ironically, her same-spot counterpart on AFI’s best heroes list was Lassie. Check out these 15 surprising facts about more Disney characters.

no more ideasNicole Fornabaio/rd.com

No more ideas

“It looks like you are out of ideas.”

Shan-Yu, the leader of the invading Huns voiced by Miguel Ferrar, erroneously thinks our 1998 heroine Mulan, who foiled his plan to behead the emperor on a balcony by convincing soldiers to dress up like concubines moments early, is out of moves and he utters this bold assumption. But everyone’s mom has told them where assuming gets them and the wannabe assassin is no different. Mulan disarms him with her fan and her dragon sidekick Mushu sends him flying off the roof with a giant firework to an explosive end. Apparently, he’s muttered his last mistake. Collider reports that the upcoming live-action version of the Chinese legend will replace him with a powerful female witch.

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No love

“So much for true love.”

It is a time-honored tradition for evil masterminds to put their foot in their mouth by claiming victory moments before their plan comes crashing down. Case in point: Ursula the splashy, sassy sea witch in The Little Mermaid. She believes she has outwitted the adorable aqua-girl, broken up her love affair with Prince Eric, and taken away her happy ending according to WhatCulture.com, but her bodacious boastful bubble is burst when the royal steers the bow of his ship into her and undoes her spells. Bea Arthur, Roseanne Barr, and Elaine Stritch were all in the running to voice Ursula, whose design was based on drag queen Divine, but the gig went to Pat Carroll, according to BuzzFeed.

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Play nice, kitty

“Nice kitty. Put me down. Please no. Stop. Stop.”

In Coco, Ernesto De La Cruz (voiced by Benjamin Bratt) went from chart-topping velvet-voiced hero to zero when it was revealed at his Day Of The Dead concert in the afterlife that he had killed Hector (Gael Garcia Bernal) when his songwriting partner told him he wanted to quit and return home, which caused his family to believe he had abandoned them. That’s when a flying feline spirit animal (an alebrije) shows up to play soccer with his face and kick him out of the stadium. The official Oh My Disney blog reports that Ernesto was animated so that his Adam’s apple would move and his throat and cheeks would vibrate whenever he broke into song. The cleft in his chin was visible while he was both alive and dead. They also wanted to get the guitar playing right so they filmed musicians with cameras attached to their guitars. The end result is that movie characters actually play the right notes in the film.

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Just a child

“Yes, just an imaginative child.”

A quiz on the studio’s Oh My Disney blog assigns this phrase as the parting thoughts of Cinderella’s wicked stepmother, Lady Tremaine. When the 1950 animated film was being made, illustrator Frank Thomas used live-action footage of an in-costume Eleanor Audley, who was the voice of the cruel socialite, as a reference when drawing the frames. According to the Disney.Fandom.com, the actress was filmed doing all of the actions required of the character in the film and the clips were then placed under animation paper as guidelines.

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Another trick

“Well, what’s this? Another one of your little bird tricks? Are there a bunch of girls in this one, too? Hello, girls!”

The circle of life in nature can be cruel and that’s the lesson Hopper learned in A Bug’s Life. Well, that and don’t mess with a smart ant named Flik who is trying to protect his loved ones and his colony. The ruthless grasshopper mistakenly thinks that Flik, who had tried to use a fake bird Trojan Horse-style to scare the violent insect away earlier in the movie, is up to old tricks. Unfortunately for the bad bug, this no fake fowl and he meets his demise as dinner for hungry chicks. According to BuzzFeed, the head of Pixar wanted the role of Hopper to go to Oscar-winning antagonist Robert DeNiro but he turned it down. Ultimately, it was voiced by Kevin Spacey.

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I’ll do anything

“Let me go. Let me go. Please, don’t hurt me. I’ll do anything. Anything!”

When Gaston made his appearance in Beauty and The Beast, he became the first male villain to appear in a Disney princess film according to BuzzFeed. He begs the Beast to spare him when he realized he cannot beat him. Belle’s hairy beau complies but in typical bad boy fashion, Gaston stabs him when he is not looking. Unfortunately for him, the cowardly act results in him falling off the balcony to his death, a grim point that was driven home in later versions of the film when cartoon skulls appeared in his pupils as he fell. During the final fight, he was supposed to scream “Time to die” but the studio felt this was too family unfriendly and the line was changed to “Belle is mine.” You’ll definitely want to take note of these life lessons everyone can learn from Beauty and the Beast.

crushing bonesNicole Fornabaio/rd.com

Crushing bones

“I’ll fix ya. I’ll fix ya. I’ll crush your bones!”

Queen Grimhilde, who is better known in the pop culture canon as the Evil Queen in Snow White & The Seven Dwarves, wasn’t one to sugarcoat her terrifying intentions. And why should she? After all, according to Buzzfeed, she was the first Disney character to ever speak in a feature-length animated film. She was also partially modeled after actress Joan Crawford, another strong diva who didn’t mince words, but Queen Grimhilde isn’t the only fictional character inspired by a real person in the history of Hollywood.

She sat on a peacock throne to illustrate her extreme vanity yet the actress who played the queen and her apple-poisoning alter-ego employed a trick that was quite the opposite to achieve a different tone for each character. She removed her false teeth before recording her lines.

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Last echo

“Anybody listening? It’s like, what am I? An echo or something? Helllooooo? Am I talking to, what, hyperspace? Hello, it’s me.”

The closing statement of Hercules‘ immortal antagonist is often mistakenly reported as “Get your slimy souls off me. Oh, I don’t feel so good. I feel a little flushed,” which he says as he is being dragged into the underworld along the River Styx after being defeated by Hercules, who according to Greek mythology would be The Little Mermaid’s cousin as her dad Poseidon is Zeus’ sibling. But to hear Hades’ actual final thoughts, you needed to have stuck out the credits. A common practice now, but back in 1997, it was fairly abnormal for the storytelling to continue past the moment where the film faded to black. According to Imgur, Hell’s leader was originally conceived to spew slow burns (get it?), but he became a fast-talking used car salesman cutthroat Hollywood agent type when James Woods signed on. Imgur also reports that animators used 72,000 pencils and 1 million sheets of animation paper to bring this myth to the screen. At least Hercules landed a spot on the 15 best Disney songs of all time.

deal with meNicole Fornabaio/rd.com

Deal with me

“Now you shall deal with me, O prince, and all the powers of hell.”

Long before the world fell in love with Game Of Thrones, there was Maleficent. Instead of wishing dragons into existence, she turned herself into one when the prince came to save the day and in Sleeping Beauty. Unfortunately for her, these were the good ol’ days of cartoons and no matter how milquetoast the hero was or how epic the bad girl, good always prevailed and the evildoer was always vanquished. In her case, after promising to unleash hellfire, the royal manages to stick a sword in her. Interestingly, the same woman who voiced Maleficent also breathed life into the lungs of another unforgettable Disney villain, the evil step-mother from Cinderella, according to Buzzfeed. She can also be heard on The Haunted Mansion ride as Madame Leota at Disneyland. Check out these amazing Disney resorts before you plan your next theme park vacation.

go into the lightNicole Fornabaio/rd.com

Go into the light

You fools! Why are you going into the light? Oh… Oooh… No! Yes… Go into the light — AAAAHHHH!

King Candy was never very nice in 2012’s Wreck-It Ralph. He didn’t get any better when it was revealed that he was also Turbo and part Cy-Bug. His final bit of dialogue represents his internal struggle. His human side doesn’t understand why his minions are stupidly flying straight to their doom, a Mentos and Diet Coke eruption. But he can’t control his program bug side and ultimately he is pulled into the light and is vaporized as well. At the time it came out, Wreck-It Ralph held the title for most unique individual characters in a film within the Disney oeuvre with 188. According to SlashFilm.com, normal Disney pictures feature 40 to 60. Some of those characters inhabited a video game world called Niceland. The way the Nicelanders are dressed was influenced by the 2011 royal wedding, which filled the news cycle at the time the costumes were being designed.

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What have you done

“Look what you’ve done. My bugs, my bugs!”

The Nightmare Before Christmas‘ burlap bag-o-bad Oogie Boogie is having a merry time torturing Santa Claus and Sally and gets so preoccupied with monologuing as enemies often do that he fails to notice that Jack Skellington is not only not dead, but he’s come to rescue his friends and save the holiday he almost screwed up. With one tug of a loose string and the help of a spinning hook, his sack seams come apart and expose his creepy crawly insides, which then plummet into a fiery hot molten mass below him. The DVD, according to MentalFloss, reveals an alternate identity and fate were considered for Oogie. Instead of being unraveled and exterminated, he’s unmasked as Dr. Finkelstein, who was upset that his create-a-wife science project Sally was in love with Jack. Disney released this off-brand stop-motion masterpiece under its Touchstone label, but still made notes about things they wanted to see changed including their desire for Jack to have eyeballs instead of big black empty sockets in order to Disneyfy the film. Creator Tim Burton stuck to his guns. The studio let him win that battle, but there are 3 things that are banned from all Disney films no matter who wants them included.

i didn't mean to call you thatNicole Fornabaio/rd.com

I didn’t mean to call you that

“No, let me explain. No, you don’t understand. No, no, I didn’t mean for … no! No! Look, I’m sorry I called you! NOOOOOO!”

Like many untrustworthy scheming traitors, Scar doesn’t take responsibility for killing his brother/Simba’s dad during the final confrontation in The Lion King. When Simba gains the upper hand, according to WhatCulture.com, Scar blames the hyenas for Mufasa’s murder and begs to be spared. When the bigger man, err, lion agrees to let him live but casts him out of the pride, he attacks again but falls into the pack of hyenas he just called the true enemies and his lie comes back to bite him … literally! Scar’s death by canine species was fitting given that was how another big bad who begged for his life only to attack again after being graciously spared was supposed to meet his maker. According to Buzzfeed, Gaston from Beauty And The Beast was supposed to survive his fall only to be eaten by wolves. It was deemed by Disney to graphic a fate to befall a human. Scar makes a cameo in another cartoon—Hercules—which was foreshadowed in The Lion King by Zazu who told him he’d make a good throw rug. In case you didn’t know, there’s an alternative ending to the Lion King…and it’s terrifying.

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Carrie Bell
Carrie Bell is a Los Angeles-based writer who has been covering travel, entertainment, food, and other culture/lifestyle topics for nearly two decades. Her work has appeared in Reader’s Digest, People, Yahoo, Cosmopolitan, Fodor’s, and Bridal Guide and she is Southern California specialist for TripSavvy. She earned a BA in journalism at Humboldt State University in only three years and co-authored The Bathtub Reader: An Amusing Miscellany for the Discerning Mademoiselle.