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Can You Guess How Old These Natural Species Are?

Photographer Rachel Sussman combines art and science in her journey to capture some of the oldest living organisms in the world. See if you can take a guess at how many years some of her subjects have been on the planet.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Bristlecone Pine

Bristlecone Pines are commonly found in the White Mountains of California.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Bristlecone Pine

Some bristlecone pines are estimated to be up to 5,000 years old. According to the National Park Service, these trees are known for their longevity and ability to survive harsh conditions.

Here’s another guessing game for you: Can you guess these animals based on their footprints?

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Posidonia Oceania Seagrass

You can find this species of seagrass in the Mediterranean, like near the Baleric Islands in Spain.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Posidonia Oceania Seagrass

The seagrasses, which grow in the sands of the Mediterranean, have been found to be about 200,000 years old, according to Popular Science.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Stromatolites

These stromatolites are in Carbla Station, Western Australia. You can also find them in Brazil, Mexico, and the Bahamas, according to Smithsonian Magazine.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Stromatolites

These layered structures have been calculated to be made up of materials that can be between 2,000 and 3,000 years old. Now, can you identify these everyday objects by their close up pictures?

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Antarctic Moss

You’re likely to find moss on Elephant Island, Antarctica.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Antarctic Moss

These mosses, many of which are frozen under layers of Antartic ice, have been discovered to be 5,500 years old.

Can you find the 15 objects hiding in this picture?

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Dead Huon Pine

You’ll find this tree all over Tasmania, an island state of Australia.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Dead Huon Pine

It’s estimated that these thick, dead tree trunks can date back to about 10,500 years ago.

Now, try to guess the famous city based on their skylines.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Llareta

You can find these curious green blobs in Atacama Desert, Chile.

© Rachel Sussman© Rachel Sussman

Llareta

This flowering plant has been shown to be more than 3,000 years old.

Can you ace this state capitals quiz?

© Rachel Sussman

The Oldest Living Things in the World

To see more, pick up the book here.

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