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15 Ridiculous Tips from Old Etiquette Books

Thankfully, it's now socially acceptable to bring your umbrella into the parlor.

Reader's Digest

When discussing food

Here are 13 more etiquette rules to use when dining at a restaurant.

Reader's Digest

When talking about what you did last night

Do consider these 50 little etiquette tips you should always try to follow.

Reader's Digest

When chatting with friends

Check out these 14 etiquette rules the British royal family always follows.

Reader's Digest

When referring to your spouse

Reader's Digest

When you are indoors

No comment on your overcoat, but you should still always follow these etiquette rules when you’re a guest in someone’s home.

Reader's Digest

When partaking in a conversation

Check out these British etiquette rules every American should follow.

Reader's Digest

When surprised

We won’t stop you from saying “oh cracky,” but these 46 Victorian era etiquette rules actually should make a comeback.

Reader's Digest

When traveling by train

To be fair, your fellow passengers would probably still appreciate this tip—especially if you’re ignoring these cell phone etiquette rules everyone should follow.

Reader's Digest

When at the table

Here are other rude and annoying dining habits to avoid.

Reader's Digest

When eyeing someone

Don’t miss these secrets etiquette class teachers won’t tell you for free.

Reader's Digest

When talking about your clothes

While you can safely ignore the “pantaloons” rule, you should still follow these rude table etiquette mistakes even polite people make.

Reader's Digest

When talking about your colleague

Depending on your relationship, that could still be sound advice. Memorize these other business etiquette rules that will boost your career.

Reader's Digest

When answering a question or comment

Do consider these magic phrases that can save an awkward conversation.

Reader's Digest

When you’re worried that you’re nagging your husband too much

While we wouldn’t recommend asking your kid if you nag too much, we do recommend reading these 17 forgotten manners every parent should teach their kids.

Reader's Digest

When in company

Sources: Don’t: A Manual of Mistakes and Improprieties More or Less Prevalent in Conduct and Speech, by Oliver Bell Bunce, 1884; The Gentleman’s Book of Etiquette, Cecil Hartley, 1873; Martine’s Handbook of Etiquette and Guide to True Politeness, Arthur Martine, 1866; Etiquette for Ladies, Lea and Blanchard, 1840; Etiquette: An Answer to the Riddle When? Where? How? Agnes H. Morton, 1899; How to Help Your Husband Get Ahead, Dorothy Carnegie, 1957; Aunt Rebecca Says, 1920.

Morgan Cutolo
Morgan is an Associate Editor at Reader’s Digest. She graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 2016 where she received her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. She writes for rd.com, helps lead the editorial relationship with our partners, manages our year-round interns, and keeps the hundreds of pieces of content our team produces every month organized. In her free time, she likes exploring the seacoast of Maine where she lives and works remotely full time and snuggling up on the couch with her corgi, Eggo, to watch HGTV or The Office.