This Is Why January Is the Biggest Month for Divorce

It’s not exactly the most cheerful way to ring in the new year.

January-divorce-month-442665469-shutterstock-sebraShutterstock/sebra

For years, January has unofficially been dubbed Divorce Month. Although a study from the University of Washington found that the most divorces actually happen in August and March, the courts still see a spike in divorce filings right after the new year.

Many legal experts believe that the reason for this trend boils down to one idea: People don’t want to get divorced during the holidays. If couples, especially those with children, have started to consider divorce before the holidays, they make a point of staying married through the end of the year so their family can have one last holiday season together before they split. Watch out for these signs that your marriage is headed for divorce.

Since January is a time for making resolutions and planning for the year ahead, couples may also want to take that time to reevaluate their marriage. As Maryland-based divorce lawyer James Gross told HuffPost, “The holidays are also a time when emotions run high, and if you are unhappy or angry in your marriage, the holidays may push those feelings to the breaking point.”

Others may get so swept up in the alternate reality of pretty lights, joyous music, and surplus merriment that they believe they can really try to make their relationship work. But once the clock strikes midnight on January 1, real-life problems start piling up again like snow on the county courthouse.

While we’d like to believe what the movies and songs suggest, the magic of the season can’t solve every problem. If you decide that divorce is your best option, be sure to follow these steps to find the right divorce lawyer for you.

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