This Is the Perfect Age to Retire, According to Science (Hint: It’s Not 65!)

A Japanese doctor says the average retirement age is completely wrong.

retireJacob Lund/ShutterstockCounting the clock until your retirement? You might want to put away your pension plan. According to a Japanese doctor, you should never clock out of the workforce—or do so well after the age of 65, at least.

In an interview with Japan Times, Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara, a physician and chairman emeritus of St. Luke’s International University, said not retiring was one of his secrets to living a long, healthy life.

Before you roll your eyes, consider this: When most people lived until age 68, the typical retirement age was around 65 years old. Now that people are living much longer, they should also hold off on retiring, Dr. Hinohara says. Staying busy well into your senior years gives you a sense of purpose and fulfillment, which could keep you healthy as you age. And doing so couldn’t be easier; just check out the perfect jobs for seniors.

Dr. Hinohara even practiced what he preached. Until a few months before his death at 105 years old, Hinohara still treated patients and worked up to 18 hours a day, according to the New York Times.

“He believed that life is all about contribution, so he had this incredible drive to help people, to wake up early in the morning and do something wonderful for other people,” journalist Judit Kawaguchi told the BBC. “This is what was driving him and what kept him living.”

Thanks to Dr. Hinohara’s example, the perfect age to retire is… well, never. By planning goals for today, tomorrow, and even the next five years, you can keep your body (and your mind!) active for decades longer.

Still aiming for an early retirement? We don’t blame you. If you want to retire with $1 million by age 50, just follow these simple rules.

Source: Business Insider

Popular Videos

Brooke Nelson
Brooke Nelson is a researcher at PBS FRONTLINE in Boston, Massachusetts, and writes regularly about travel, health, and culture news for Reader’s Digest. Previously she was a staff writer at Reader's Digest. Her articles have also appeared on MSN, Business Insider, and Yahoo Finance, among other sites. She earned a BA in international relations from Hendrix College. Follow her on Twitter @BrookeTNelson.