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30 Hilarious Made Up Words You’ll Want to Start Using

Just remember, people might not understand you if you start using these.

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“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.” —Through the Looking Glass

I agree with Mr. Dumpty: Words have meaning. But surely we can seize upon a meaning and then create a word to match it. The following words—some culled from the crowdsourced online dictionary urbandictionary.com and others I’ve concocted myself—don’t exist according to Merriam-Webster … but should. I call them “worderfuls.” Try using these funny words to improve your vocabulary.

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A crapella

(ah kra-‘peh-luh) adj.—Sung (badly) while listening to music using headphones.

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Athlethargy

(ath-‘leh-ther-jee) n.—The triumph of the La-Z-Boy over the StairMaster.

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Basebull

(‘bays-bull) n.—The endless litany of RBIs, ERAs, OPS, WHIP, and hits at the fingertips of every major-league basebore.

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Beerboard

(‘beer-bohrd) v.—To ­extract secret information from colleagues by getting them drunk.

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Blamestorming

(‘blaym-stohr-ming)n.—The act of attempting to identify the person who is most at fault for a plan’s failure.

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Carcolepsy

(‘kahr-kuh-lep-see) n.—The tendency to fall asleep as soon as the car starts moving. These are the funniest words in the English language, according to science.

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Caroma

(kah-‘roh-muh) n.—The smell of that month-old bean burrito under the front seat that keeps you out of the carpool.

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Cellfish

(‘sel-fish) n.—Someone who talks on the phone to the exclusion of those he or she is with.

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Chairdrobe

(‘chair-drohb) n.—A chair on which one piles clothes that belong in the closet. Not to be confused with a floordrobe.

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petsJiri-Hera/Shutterstock

Chiptease

(‘chip-teez) n.—A bag of potato chips that seems full but is mostly air.

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Destinesia

(des-tuh-‘nee-zhuh) n.—When you get to where you intended to go but forget why you wanted to go there.

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Dudevorce

(‘dood-vohrs) n.—When two bros end their friendship. These words are so funny that they sound made up.

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Dullema

(duh-‘leh-muh) n.—The choice between two equally boring outcomes.

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Epiphinot

(ih-‘pih-fuh-not) n.—An idea that seems like an amazing insight to the conceiver but is in fact pointless, mundane, stupid, or incorrect.

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Errorist

(‘air-er-ist) n.—Someone who is repeatedly or invariably wrong.

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Handwritten note is on the keyboard. - Sorry. Sad smiley face drawn in black.Korelidou Mila/Shutterstock

Fauxpology

(foh-‘pah-luh-jee) n.—An insincere expression of regret.

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Illiteration

(il-lih-tuh-‘ray-shuhn) n.—The mistaken impression that you know more about rhetorical devices than you really do.

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Internest

(‘in-ter-nest) n.—The cocoon of blankets and pillows you gather around yourself for extended periods on the Internet.

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Metox

(‘mee-toks) v.—To take a break from self-absorption. Check out these quirky words that don’t have an English translation.

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Narcisexual

(nahr-suh-‘sek-shoo-uhl) n.—Someone attracted only to him- or herself.

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Nerdjacking

(‘nurd-jak-ing) n.—Filling a conversation with unnecessary detail about one’s passion to an obviously uninterested bystander.

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Two women friends talking to each other on a couch in apartmentloreanto/Shutterstock

Nonversation

(non-ver-‘say-shuhn) n.—A completely meaningless or useless conversation.

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Pregret

(pree-‘gret) v.—To know what you’re about to do is wrong, wrong, wrong while also knowing you will do it anyway.

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Presstitute

(‘preh-stih-toot) n.­—A biased or one-sided journalist.

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talkAlena-Ozerova/shutterstock

Preteentious

(prih-‘teen-shuhs) adj.—A level of drama achievable only by a 12-year-old. 

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Sinergy

(‘sih-ner-jee) n.—When two bad acts feel as good as three.

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Suckrifice

(‘suh-krih-fys) n.—­Doing what you absolutely must do, even though you really, ­really hate it.

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Textpectation

(tekst-pek-‘tay-shuhn) n.—The anticipation felt when awaiting a response to a text. 

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Stylish African American black businessman types information from his credit card to the smartphone standing before a modern glass building outsideIVASHstudio/Shutterstock

Typerventilate

(ty-per-‘ven-tih-layt) v.—To send messages in rapid sequence.

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African american girl reading a book at home.bbernard/Shutterstock

Unlighten

(uhn-‘ly-ten) ­v.—To learn­ something that makes you dumber. Next, read about these words that don’t mean what you think they do.