How to Clean Using Hydrogen Peroxide

This medicine cabinet staple does more than disinfect.

From Extraordinary Uses for Ordinary Things (Reader's Digest Association Books) and

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Remove stains of unknown origin
Can’t tell what that stain is? Still want to remove it? Try this sure-fire remover: Mix a teaspoon of 3% hydrogen peroxide with a little cream of tartar or a dab of non-gel toothpaste. Rub the paste on the stain with a soft cloth. Rinse. The stain, whatever it was, should be gone.

Remove wine stains
Hydrogen peroxide works well to remove wine stains so don’t worry if you spill while you quaff.

Remove grass stains
If grass stains are ruining your kids’ clothes, hydrogen peroxide may bring relief. Mix a few drops of ammonia with just 1 teaspoon 3% hydrogen peroxide. Rub on the stain. As soon as it disappears, rinse and launder.

Remove mildew
The sight and smell of mildew is a bathroom’s enemy. Bring out the tough ammunition: a bottle of 3% hydrogen peroxide. Don’t water it down, just attack directly by pouring the peroxide on the offending area. Wipe it clean. Mildew surrender.

Remove bloodstains
This works only on fresh bloodstains: Apply 3% hydrogen peroxide directly to the stain, rinse with fresh water, and launder as usual.

Sanitize your cutting board
Hydrogen peroxide is a surefire bacteria-killer — just the ally you need to fight the proliferation of bacteria on your cutting board, especially after you cut chicken or other meat. To kill the germs on your cutting board, use a paper towel to wipe the board down with vinegar, then use another paper towel to wipe it with hydrogen peroxide. Ordinary 3% peroxide is fine.