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15 Etiquette Rules Disney Employees Must Follow

Think working at Disney sounds like a dream job? See if you still feel that way after seeing all of these strict rules park employees must follow.

Mandatory Credit: Photo by John Raoux/AP/Shutterstock (10442147a) Guests watch a show near a statue of Walt Disney and Mickey Mouse in front of the Cinderella Castle at the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Disney World employees are easy targets. Tourists scream at them, sexually harass them and in the most serious cases, physically attack them, according to law enforcement reports Exchange-Disney Workers Abuse, Lake Buena Vista, USA - 09 Jan 2019John Raoux/AP/Shutterstock
Mandatory Credit: Photo by John Raoux/AP/Shutterstock (10442147a)
Guests watch a show near a statue of Walt Disney and Mickey Mouse in front of the Cinderella Castle at the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Disney World employees are easy targets. Tourists scream at them, sexually harass them and in the most serious cases, physically attack them, according to law enforcement reports
Exchange-Disney Workers Abuse, Lake Buena Vista, USA - 09 Jan 2019

The most magical place on earth

It's a dream to work at the most magical place on earth. However, like any job, there are perks and then there are downsides, even at Disney World. There are strict rules and guidelines people have to follow if they work for Disney World. Here are 8 secret spots you never knew existed in Disney Parks.

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All the park's a stage

Disney employees aren't technically "employees"—they're "Cast Members." And no, not just the ones who play actual Disney characters. Every employee in the park, whether they operate rides, serve food, or actually put on a show, is a "Cast Member." The idea is that the entire Disney park itself is a "stage." Even Disney's career website talks about the "unique opportunities available to Cast Members." Ever wonder why Mickey and Minnie always wear gloves? Here's why you'll see most of the original Disney characters donning gloved hands.

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Everything is Disney

And what's the most important thing a Cast Member has to do? Stay in character, of course. If you're playing a Disney character, that character's world becomes your world. You're not allowed to make references to any pop culture that exists outside of the Disney universe. From the moment you don the costume to the moment you take it off, you can't talk about anything that Snow White, Peter Pan, or whomever you're playing wouldn't know about—whether that's the latest iPhone or the Harry Potter park just across Orlando. Cast members interact with hundreds of people per day, so make sure you avoid these rude habits when you visit. 

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Height requirements

Just like you have to be 44 inches tall to ride Space Mountain, you have to be a certain height to portray certain Disney roles. Most notably, anyone aspiring to play a Disney princess—yes, any princess—must be between 5'4" and 5'8". If you're shorter, between 4'11" and 5'2", you can play other characters, including Alice from Alice in Wonderland and Wendy from Peter Pan. This is the longest ride in Disney World.

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Looking the part

From hair to fingernails, Disney has lots of requirements for the physical appearances of their employees. Women's hair needs to be in a "classic" style and a natural-looking color. Women actually can have highlights, but they must be "subtle, well-blended, and be over the entire head," according to Disney's career site. As for men, their hair can't cover their ears or be long enough to reach their collars. Men are allowed to have facial hair, but it must be neat, and it can't be longer than a quarter of an inch.

There are also very specific fingernail rules for anyone working in food or merchandise. Your fingernails can't extend beyond your fingertips, and you can't wear nail polish or fake nails. Surprisingly, you can actually have a tattoo—but it has to be completely covered, whether by clothing or opaque makeup. And here's more about what it's really like to play a princess at Walt Disney World.

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Jewel rules

Women are allowed to wear one ring on each hand and only one earring in each ear. For men, the ring rule is the same, but earrings aren't allowed at all. You can have other piercings, but you have to remove them while at work. Gauges are prohibited altogether. Check out the full list of surprising dress code rules for Disney employees.

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First name basis

Cast Members are only known by their first names—no "Mr." or "Miss." Rumor has it that this tradition dates right back to Walt Disney himself. He always told everyone at the Disney parks to call him Walt, not Mr. Disney. Employees also wear name tags with only their first names on them. A weirder aspect of this rule? Cast Members aren't allowed to have duplicate names. Disney can still hire multiple people with the same first name, but there's no using last initials—one of the people has to choose a new name to go by while at Disney. It seems a little weird...but on the bright side, maybe they can view it as the same as being a character. This is why Disney World rarely has any power outages.

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What's the point

Disney employees have a special way of pointing. If they're giving directions, they're not allowed to point with one finger, since it could potentially be considered rude. Instead, they employ a special Disney point, often with two fingers or sometimes even with the whole hand. Aside from being more friendly in general, it's also more kid-friendly, because it's easier for children to see. Don't miss these insider secrets from a Disney World super-fan.

Row of trash bins with garbage, recycling, and compost cans along a wallPeterVandenbelt/Shutterstock

Graceful garbage disposal

If a Cast Member sees a piece of trash on the ground, he or she must pick it up—litter has no place in the Happiest Place on Earth. But they can't just pick it up—Disney employees have to use a special maneuver to pick up trash. Rather than squatting down, they have to collect the trash with a graceful "swoop-and-scoop" motion. That sounds like lots of fun to practice during training.

Performers take part in a parade at the Disney Resort in Shanghai, China, on the eve of its grand opening. The debut of Shanghai Disneyland offers Walt Disney Co. "incredible potential" for boosting its brand in the world's most populous market, Disney's chief executive said Wednesday ahead of Thursday's grand opening for the $5.5 billion parkNg Han Guan/Shutterstock

They're all-knowing

If someone asks a Cast Member a question about the park, those three deadly words— "I don't know"— are absolutely forbidden. Even if it's true, the Cast Member must ask another employee or call a park operator until they find out the answer. Find out the best spots to work at Disney parks, according to former employees.

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