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16 Indoor Flowering Plants to Make Your Home More Colorful

Plants are a healthy, pleasing addition to any indoor setting—and flowering plants are even better! Add some color and natural beauty to your home with these indoor flowering plants.

Every editorial product is independently selected, though we may be compensated or receive an affiliate commission if you buy something through our links. Ratings and prices are accurate and items are in stock as of time of publication.

a potted fern, flowering begonia, and a purple African violet on a windowsill in a houseMarina Kositsyna/getty images

Best flowering plants for your home

Indoor flowering plants offer all the benefits of their less flashy cousins, with the added bonus of year-round or seasonal color and, depending on the plant, some lovely fragrance. If you’re already a plant parent and want to make some colorful additions to your indoor plant family, we have suggestions for indoor flowering plants that will grow in a variety of conditions, including in low light. And if plant parenting is a new hobby, you’ll be happy to hear there are several low-maintenance indoor plants that give off great blooms.

Take a look at this unranked list of the best indoor flowering plants, including tips on where to buy plants online.

pink wax begonias close upMagnifiqueshot/Getty Images

Wax begonia

Semperflorens-Cultorum group

Part of the more than 2,000-member Begoniaceae family of plants, wax begonia is a low-maintenance indoor flowering plant that can do well in a variety of indoor lighting conditions. It’s a cute, compact plant that flowers from spring to early winter, though you may be able to coax a longer blooming season indoors. Begonias do well with a peat-based potting soil mix, and they like consistency—bright light but not intense sunlight, warm temperatures and watering about once a week. You’ll find these hybrid varieties in a range of white, pink, peach and flashy red colors.

Pros:

  • Low-maintenance
  • Easily cultivated with clippings
  • Colorful foliage even when not in bloom

Cons:

  • Potted begonias are susceptible to root rot
  • Watch for powdery mildew

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purple African violet in a pot on a windowsill in a houseLusyaya/getty images

African violet

Streptocarpus sect. Saintpaulia

Often given as housewarming or host/hostess gifts, colorful African violets will reward their thoughtful caretaker with soft, lush, velvety leaves and year-round blooms in a range of purple, pink, white and bluish colors. These somewhat finicky plants like lots of bright, indirect light and periodic fertilizing. Because they’re subject to root rot, they’re better off being watered from below. Since they’re nontoxic to pets, African violets are a great choice for houses with cats and dogs.

Pros:

  • Year-round blooms
  • Thrives in indoor temperatures

Cons:

  • Prone to fungal disease
  • Highly sensitive to overwatering

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Red Flamingo Flower in a white pot on a wooden table with sunlight coming in from a nearby window creating shadows on the wallOKrasyuk/getty images

Flamingo flower

Anthurium

One of a family of about a thousand tropical flowering plants, showy flamingo flowers are loved for their bright red blooms—which are actually just leaves, or spathes, that have changed color. The real flower on this indoor flowering plant is the spadix, the elongated spike that’s cradled by the red leaf. In keeping with their tropical origins, easy-to-care-for flamingo flowers like humid environments, bright, indirect light and temperatures consistently above 60 degrees.

Pros:

  • Showy plant with glossy red flowers
  • Thrives indoors
  • Looks great clustered with other plants

Con:

  • Poisonous to dogs, cats and other domestic animals

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Close-Up Of yellow and Pink Orchids Flowers In PotJakub Rutkiewicz/Getty Images

Orchids

Phalaenopsis

Easy to love, easy to kill, orchids are gorgeous, complicated, delicate flowering epiphytes that are often given as gifts. And sadly, many of these pricey plants wind up in the compost pile due to poor plant care. But a well-tended orchid will reward year after year with an annual, elaborate bloom stalk that lasts for several weeks. No extremes for these beauties—their happy place is in indirect light, with a well-drained bark base (no soil!) and gentle pruning. If you’re thinking about buying an orchid, read our plant watering guide first.

Pros:

  • “Labors of love” that reward with long-lasting blooms
  • Huge range of colors and patterns in the Phalaenopsis family

Cons:

  • It takes time and study to get the hang of orchid care
  • Difficult to rehabilitate an ailing orchid

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Two white calla lilies with green leavesaimintang/Getty Images

Calla lily

Zantedeschia aethiopica

Best known for their white variety but also available in pink and red cultivars, calla lilies are elegant indoor flowering plants that are easy to care for and can thrive in most environments. They like indirect light and once-a-week watering, plus the occasional turning of their pot or vase to make sure all sides get equal light exposure. Calla lilies will bloom continuously from the spring through the summer, with a dense plant sending up several tulip-shaped spathes with spadix poking out.

Pros:

Con:

  • Mildly toxic to domestic animals

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Bromeliad IndoorsDaniela Duncan/Getty Images

Bromeliad

Bromeliaceae

Few plants do as well with benign neglect as bromeliads, which require little more than to be left alone. These flowering epiphytes bloom only once in their lifetime, but they keep on giving—once they’re done blooming they’ll send off pups that will bloom and start their own “families.” Water them once a week or so by filling their central leaf cup, flushing out any old water between waterings. Hanging plants should be misted once a week.

Pros:

  • A huge family of plant varieties with interesting flowers
  • Very easy to care for
  • Nontoxic to pets

Cons:

  • Prone to root rot if overwatered
  • Slow growing

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three different colored l Kalanchoe flowers in a basket on a windowsillartursfoto/Getty Images

Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana

Bring a kalanchoe into your home and you’ll have a friend for life—or at least for several years. Hardy, easy-to-care-for kalanchoe will bloom with small red, yellow, pink or white flowers, typically between late winter and early spring—they need long winter nights to prepare for blooming. Kalanchoe are succulents that need to dry out between watering, so figure on giving them a drink every two weeks or so. They like sandy, well-drained soil and full to partial sun.

Pros:

  • Easy to care for
  • Long bloom period

Cons:

  • Sensitive to overwatering
  • Toxic to pets

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Red blooming Christmas cactus by the windowNadezhda_Nesterova/Getty Images

Christmas cactus

Schlumbergera

Christmas cactus plants are the gifts that keep on giving. Originally from humid, balmy Brazil, these popular flowering plants are beloved for their longevity and ease of care. Plus, they can be easily propagated. And of course, everyone loves their abundant blooms, which may or may not get the memo to bloom right around Christmas. Ranging in shades from white to orange to bright pink, Christmas cacti will flower when they receive 12 to 14 hours of complete darkness every night, which in many places makes them better suited for indoors. With steady, indirect light and sparse watering, your plant will deliver a bounty of delightful blooms.

Pros:

  • Easy to care for
  • Can live for decades
  • Great table decoration or hanging plant

Cons:

  • May need to be coaxed into blooming
  • Cannot tolerate hot, dry conditions

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Beautiful red poinsettia in flowerpot by the windowAndrei Lavrinov/Getty Images

Poinsettia

Euphorbia pulcherrima

The flowering plant most widely associated with Christmas, poinsettias have been the victims of a lot of disinformation, including that they’re an annual plant that will die after the holidays—not true! Like Christmas cacti, poinsettias need 12 to 14 hours of complete darkness to keep blooming. They also love a bright sunny spot and regular watering. And another poinsettia myth? Those cheerful red, white or green flowers aren’t flowers at all—they’re leaves.

Pros:

  • Inexpensive and widely available
  • Great for holiday decorating

Cons:

  • Highly susceptible to root rot
  • Cannot tolerate temperatures under 60 degrees
  • Mildly toxic to dogs and cats

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peace lily in a pot by a window with bright right sheer curtainsHelin Loik-Tomson/getty images

Peace lily

Spathiphyllum

Often confused with calla lilies for their similar blooms, peace lilies are actually much different from Zantedeschia aethiopica. An evergreen with long, wide, glossy green leaves, peace lilies will thrive in a warm setting with indirect light. Like calla lilies, their “blooms” are actually white spaths that cradle a yellow spadix inside. With frequent watering and the right conditions, they can bloom year-round and grow quite tall.

Pros:

  • Healthy, easy to grow
  • Evergreen plants that “tell you” when they need watering

Cons:

  • Need just the right light conditions to thrive and bloom
  • Toxic to humans and pets

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Abutilon pictum orange flowers. Common names Indian mallow, velvetleaf or flowering mapleValentyna Tymchenko/Getty Images

Flowering maple

Abutilon striatum

Despite the name, pretty flowering maple plants are unrelated to maple trees but earned the moniker for their maple-shaped leaves. Also called abutilon, Indian mallow or parlor maple, these popular indoor flowering plants can be grown from seeds and come in a pleasing variety of bloom colors and shapes. The flowering maple likes direct sun but should be protected from intense exposure during the hottest hours of the day. Keep them moist but well drained.

Pros:

  • Easily grown from seed
  • Continuous, year-round blooms when properly cared for

Cons:

  • Sensitive to temperature fluctuations
  • Subject to mites and other indoor plant pests

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Amaryllis flowers on windowsillJohner Images/Getty Images

Amaryllis

Hippeastrum

If you love the satisfaction of nurturing a plant from bulb to bloom, then look no further than amaryllis. Available in pretty red, white, pink, salmon and bi-color varieties and in single- or double-bloom forms, amaryllis are a showy, trumpet-shaped flower. Amaryllis is a hearty indoor flowering plant that can also be moved outdoors in warm weather. But they can also be finicky—consult this amaryllis care guide for the particulars of growing healthy plants.

Pros:

  • Quickly grow from bulb to bloom
  • Will bloom nearly year-round in the right conditions

Cons:

  • Requires steady care; not a hands-off plant
  • Commercial blooms are subject to diseases, including red blotch

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pink Euphorbia milii flowermansum008/Getty Images

Crown of thorns

Euphorbia milii

As indoor flowering plants go, they don’t get much more low-maintenance than crown of thorns. A relative of the poinsettia, crown of thorns are a drought-tolerant succulent, meaning they’ll survive if you occasionally forget to water them, and they’ll do well in dry indoor air, including in the winter when the heat is turned on. They come in a wide variety of colorful blooms and like a little bit of liquid fertilizer every now and then.

Pros:

  • Easy to care for
  • Thrives in a variety of indoor conditions

Cons:

  • Sap from leaves is poisonous to humans and pets
  • Stems are very thorny

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Pink geranium flowersranmaru_/Getty Images

Geraniums

Pelargonium

Though they’re considered a mainstay of windowsills and garden beds in many parts of the world, colorful common geraniums can also thrive indoors, where they can either be kept year-round or brought indoors during the winter months. They’re most often available in shades of red, pink and white, and they do well in bright, natural light. Geraniums look great in hanging baskets, in a tabletop vase (as long as they have enough light) or in windowsill containers. Allow well-drained soil to dry out between waterings.

Pros:

  • Naturally repel mosquitoes, spiders and many other insects
  • Will flower year-round in the right conditions

Cons:

  • Highly sensitive to overwatering
  • Susceptible to a variety of common plant pests

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White lemon flower blossoms on green treedmf87/Getty Images

Lemon tree

Citrus limon

Among the most popular indoor fruit trees, lemon trees are pleasing plants that bear a lot of fruit—literally and metaphorically. They have attractive, dark green glossy leaves, give off a fragrant perfume when their delicate white flowers bloom and can produce an annual harvest of tasty, useful lemons. They’re not carefree, though, and need regular fertilizing and plenty of bright light. They also prefer to spend their summers outdoors.

Pros:

  • Hardy plants that do well indoors
  • Fragrant flowers and edible fruit

Cons:

  • Highly sensitive to overwatering
  • Susceptible to several plant pests, especially when outdoors

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Bird Paradise Flower In Helsinki GardenOleksandr Petrov/Getty Images

Bird of paradise

Strelitzia

To impart a tropical vibe into your house or apartment, consider adding an exotic bird of paradise plant. We consider this a true plant lover’s plant, especially since it’s slow to bloom and may not bloom consistently every year. But even without their showy, interesting flowers, these are pretty plants with broad, glossy leaves and a nice overall shape. Water them only when the soil is dry, and make sure they get plenty of natural light.

Pros:

  • Easy to care for, attractive indoor plant
  • Don’t require frequent repotting

Cons:

  • Bloom infrequently and may not bloom at all when indoors
  • Toxic to pets

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Elizabeth Heath
Elizabeth Heath is a travel and lifestyle writer based in Italy. Her writing on travel and sustainability appears in national and international publications and she is the author of several guidebooks. For RD.com and sister publication FamilyHandyman.com, she writes about pets (especially dogs!), books, seasonal gift guides, home improvement, and outdoor living.