50 Secrets Your Veterinarian Won’t Tell You

We asked veterinarians and vet technicians to reveal pet vet tips and cautionary tales, which can save time, trouble, and trauma for everyone in the family.

View as Slideshow

 

The dogs that scare me most are the little Chihuahuas

The dogs that scare me most are the little ChihuahuasiStock/SuperflyImages
“People always ask, ‘How do you handle pit bulls and rottweilers and big German shepherds?’ The truth is, the dogs that scare me most are the little Chihuahuas. They’re much more likely to bite.” —Mark Howes, DVM, owner and medical director of Berglund Animal Hospital in Evanston, Illinois Here's what your favorite dog breed reveals about your personality

If you are aggressive to the staff, you will be treated differently

If you are aggressive to the staff, you will be treated differentlyiStock/skynesher
“Most hospitals keep comprehensive records of behavior—of both your pet and you! If you are aggressive to the staff, you will be treated differently.” —Oscar Chavez, DVM, program director for the vet tech program at California Polytechnic State University in Pomona, California

Looking for a way to say thank you to your vet?

Looking for a way to say thank you to your vet?iStock/Jon Schulte
“Last year, one pet owner gave us a check for $100, saying we could use it at our discretion for an animal in need. That was a wonderful gift.” Patty Khuly, VMD, a vet in Miami, Florida

Content continues below ad

The reason your pet is fat is because you are too

The reason your pet is fat is because you are tooiStock/Nailia Schwarz
"I would never say that to someone in an exam room, but the fact of the matter is, if you have an owner who overeats and is inactive, they are very likely to have an obese pet.” —Oscar Chavez, DVM

We’re a vet hospital, not a dog hotel

We’re a vet hospital, not a dog hoteliStock/WebSubstance
“People will get upset because their dog got a sheet instead of two fluffy blankets or because their dog didn’t get hand-fed. We’re just trying to get your dog better so he can come home and you can spoil him.” —Jessica Stout-Harris, a vet tech who runs confessionsfromtheanimalshelter.com

We know when you’re twisting the facts

We know when you’re twisting the factsiStock/Tashi Delek
“If your dog has a five-pound tumor hanging from his skin, please don’t tell me it wasn’t there yesterday.” —Phil Zeltzman, DVM, a traveling veterinary surgeon in Allentown, Pennsylvania,and the author of Walk a Hound, Lose a Pound Don't ignore these signs of cancer in dogs

Content continues below ad

Don't blame me if you're frugal

Don't blame me if you're frugaliStock/PeopleImages
“Here's a pet peeve: Owners who don’t want to pay for diagnostic tests but then cop an attitude because you don’t know what’s wrong with the animal. Since you wouldn’t let me do the blood work or X-rays, how the heck do you expect me to know?” —A vet in South Carolina

Please respect that we're trying to work

Please respect that we're trying to work iStock/BraunS
“If you’re visiting your pet in the hospital, and we say something along the lines of ‘OK, it’s time to let Fluffy sleep now,’ often what we really mean is that you’re in our way, and we’re trying to treat other patients.” —Jessica Stout-Harris

I personally wouldn’t take my dog to a dog park

I personally wouldn’t take my dog to a dog parkiStock/malamooshi
“I understand the value of dog parks, but I personally wouldn’t take my dog there. We see a lot of dogs who were injured at dog parks.” —Rachel Simpson, a vet tech at Adobe Animal Hospital in Los Altos, California

Content continues below ad

Every time I save a life, every time I fix a patient, that makes everything worth it

Every time I save a life, every time I fix a patient, that makes everything worth itiStock/mediaphotos
"I love it when a client says, ‘I wish my physician would treat me as nice as you treat my pets.’” —Phil Zeltzman, DVM

We don't want your pets to be in pain

We don't want your pets to be in painiStock/gebai
“A lot of veterinarians have told me matter-of-factly that they still don’t use painkillers for procedures that we know are painful. They think that dogs and cats don’t need it or that feeling pain after surgery is good because it keeps them from moving around too much. But research has shown that pets who are in less pain heal faster, sleep better, and don’t move around as much.” —Dennis Leon, DVM, director at Levittown Animal Hospital in Long Island, New York

You must license your dogs

You must license your dogsiStock/mediaphotos
“At a veterinary meeting I attended, it came to light that more than half the vets there had not licensed their dogs, which is required by local law.” —Patty Khuly, VMD

Content continues below ad

I know she shouldn't have it, but...

I know she shouldn't have it, but...iStock/mustipan
“You should never give pets chocolate, because it’s toxic to most of them. But my cat is obsessed with it and is all over me when I’m eating it, so sometimes I give her a sliver. Just an itsy-bitsy, tiny one.” —A vet in California

Every time we help a pet, we help a person

Every time we help a pet, we help a personiStock/elenaleonova
“The classic example is the 80-year-old grandma who has nothing in life but her cat. She’s a widow with very limited social contact, and the cat is what connects her to life. So when we help her cat, she’s really the one we’re helping.” —Phil Zeltzman, DVM

When people surrender their pets because they can’t afford their problems, I often end up with them

When people surrender their pets because they can’t afford their problems, I often end up with themiStock/Chalabala
“I’ve got a three-legged cat, a one-eyed cat, three dogs that required major surgeries, one goat, and 11 chickens.”—Patty Khuly, VMD

Content continues below ad

We'll do things for free

We'll do things for freeiStock/nimon_t
“Sometimes we do things for free, just because we want to help the pet.” —Sandy Willis, DVM, DACVIM, an internal medicine consultant in Seattle, Washington

New staff or training students sometimes practice injections or catheter placements on your pet

New staff or training students sometimes practice injections or catheter placements on your petiStock/mphillips007
“If you’d rather not allow your pet to be used this way, make sure you say something beforehand.” —Oscar Chavez, DVM

I’ll let you in on the secret of no-kill shelters...

I’ll let you in on the secret of no-kill shelters...istock/stefanoborsani
“We had a contract with our local Humane Society that stated we’d euthanize the animals in their care that needed to be put down. One Sunday, they sent us 72 cats to put down. By the end, we were all emotionally devastated.” —Jessica Stout-Harris

Content continues below ad

We rarely can help with behavioral issues

We rarely can help with behavioral issuesistock/YuriyGreen
“Behavior issues are the No. 1 cause of pet re-homing, euthanasia, and death. Yet, because it’s not medical, most of us don’t learn much about that in veterinary school.” —Oscar Chavez, DVM These are the first five things to train your puppy

Your vet may not have gotten into vet school!

Your vet may not have gotten into vet school!istock/TheaDesign
“Vets who can’t get into traditional U.S. veterinary programs due to bad grades and poor test scores often go to for-profit schools in the Caribbean, where, basically, if you can pay the tuition, you get in.” —A vet in California

No regulation says vets have to check certain lists before they euthanize an animal

No regulation says vets have to check certain lists before they euthanize an animalistock/ShotShare
“Lots of vets still do convenience euthanasia for owners who prefer the easy way out. We see a lot of euthanasia in November and December, for example, just because people are getting ready for the holidays. I refuse to do it.” —Oscar Chavez, DVM

Content continues below ad

Your $2,000 designer dog is a mutt

Your $2,000 designer dog is a muttistock/Renphoto
“Puppy stores and breeders have created these cute names like Morkipoos and Puggles, and now people are paying $2,000 for a dog they couldn’t give away at the pound ten years ago. Whoever started the trend is a marketing genius.” —Dennis Leon, DVM Check out these fascinating stories behind common dog breed names

I hate retractable leashes

I hate retractable leashesistock/Lightstar59
“The stopping mechanism pops open so easily, and suddenly the pet is flying to the end of it, and maybe it’s into the street or into the jaws of another dog. I’ve had people bring in a pet who got hit by a car because they were using a retractable leash and the stopping mechanism broke.” —Bernadine Cruz, DVM, associate vet at Laguna Hills Animal Hospital in Laguna Woods, California

Healthy pets don't need vitamins

Healthy pets don't need vitaminsistock/themacx
“Even though you see vitamins on the shelves in pet stores, healthy pets don’t need them. The pet food companies have spent billions of dollars to make sure their food is properly balanced with every vitamin and mineral a pet needs.” —A vet in California

Content continues below ad

Don't feed your pet a raw-food diet

Don't feed your pet a raw-food dietistock/ThamKC
“Some people are really into a raw-food diet for pets, but it’s a huge public health hazard. Think about it: You have raw meat, you’re touching it, your dog touches it, and then your dog goes and licks the baby. I’ve had two patients die and two patients get really sick from it.” —Amber Andersen, DVM, a vet at Point Vicente Animal Hospital in Rancho Palos Verdes, California

The cheaper, over-the-counter spot-on flea and tick treatments are extremely dangerous

The cheaper, over-the-counter spot-on flea and tick treatments are extremely dangerousistock/Gregory_DUBUS
“I’ve seen animals having violent seizures after using them; I’ve seen animals die. Ironically, most of these animals still have live fleas crawling all over them.” —A vet in California Here's how to make a natural flea collar for your pet

Indoor cats don’t really need to be vaccinated

Indoor cats don’t really need to be vaccinatedistock/Bradley Hebdon
“After their kitten vaccinations, indoor cats don’t really need to be vaccinated. They’re not going to get rabies sitting inside the house. Vaccines have the potential to create a lot of harm for cats, including possible tumors at the vaccine site.” —Jill Elliot, DVM, owner of Holistic Vet in New York and New Jersey

Content continues below ad

Don't judge your dog's health by his nose

Don't judge your dog's health by his noseistock/Searsie
"A cold, wet nose on a dog does not necessarily mean he’s healthy. I’ve seen plenty of sick dogs with wet noses.” —Mark Howes, DVM

The biggest mistake pet owners make is calling the vet too late

The biggest mistake pet owners make is calling the vet too lateistock/from2015
“Pets rarely get colds or the flu, and they almost never get food poisoning. So if they’re sick for more than a day, call us.” —Sandy Willis, DVM, DACVIM

If your animal is really sick, it’s better to bring him in during the morning

If your animal is really sick, it’s better to bring him in during the morningistock/Pekic
“A vet I once worked with would do a huge workup when a sick animal came in early. But if the animal came in late in the day, the vet would actually encourage the owner to euthanize. But I would add that this is not common.” —A vet in South Carolina

Content continues below ad

Unfortunately, many clinics cut corners to make a profit

Unfortunately, many clinics cut corners to make a profitistock/pyotr021
“Unfortunately, I’ve had to work in low-cost clinics, and many of them are cutting corners to make a profit. Some places give half doses of vaccines instead of full doses, which is totally illegal and ineffective.” —A vet in California

If it seems like you are paying more at corporate-owned hospitals, you likely are

If it seems like you are paying more at corporate-owned hospitals, you likely areistock/Aslan Alphan
“The vets who work for most corporate-owned vet hospitals are paid monthly bonus checks based on how much money they bring in from clients. So if it seems like you are paying more at one of those hospitals, you likely are.” —Jessica Stout-Harris

Invest in pet insurance

Invest in pet insuranceistock/Fly_dragonfly
“Some people worry that paying for pet insurance will be a waste if they don’t use it. But when you renew your fire insurance on your house, do you say, ‘Shoot, my house didn’t burn down last year—I wasted all that money’?” —Phil Zeltzman, DVM

Content continues below ad

Don't ask me what I make

Don't ask me what I makeistock/Nikolodion
“If we wanted to go into it for the money, we’d have become human doctors.” —Oscar Chavez, DVM

The job's not easy

The job's not easyistock/BraunS
“Most vets put themselves through 8 to 12 years of school and have huge student debts. We love animals and want to help them. Most of us start our day early, finish late, and are available for emergencies.” —Phil Zeltzman, DVM

Always check out the staff when looking for a new vet

Always check out the staff when looking for a new vetistock/gdjukanovic
“When you’re looking for a new vet, always check out the staff. A lot of times they’ll be listed online. Look for technicians who are certified or licensed (they’ll have RVT, LVT or CVT after their names).” —MeiMei Welker, DVM, outreach vet at DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital in Portland, Oregon

Content continues below ad

Giving food is not giving love

Giving food is not giving loveistock/knape
“Obesity will hurt their health and decrease their life span. Instead, give affection. Pet them, brush them, love them, and walk them.” —Bernadine Cruz, DVM

Home cooking for your pet is harder than you think

Home cooking for your pet is harder than you thinkistock/Chalabala
“I once saw a dog who was fed a home-cooked diet of chicken breast and vegetables for a year, and his bones became so weak that his jaw broke. If you would like to cook for your pet, find a veterinary nutritionist who can help guide you, or check out balanceit.com.” —Monica Revel, DVM, a vet in West Hollywood, California

Want to know how to make sure your vet is up on the latest stuff?

Want to know how to make sure your vet is up on the latest stuff?istock/takasuu
“Ask how he puts your pet to sleep. If he says he uses ketamine or halothane gas, that’s not good. That’s like 1970s medicine. Isoflurane and sevoflurane are a lot safer.” —Rachel Simpson

Content continues below ad

You can go to an online pharmacy and get the same exact drugs you would get from your vet for 10 to 20 percent off

You can go to an online pharmacy and get the same exact drugs you would get from your vet for 10 to 20 percent offistock/StudioThreeDots
“But check first to make sure it’s certified as a Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Site (VIPPS certified). Some vets will also match online prices—you just have to know to ask.” —Patty Khuly, VMD

Just because a food is premium priced doesn’t mean it’s good stuff

Just because a food is premium priced doesn’t mean it’s good stuffistock/StudioThreeDots
“That’s especially true with many foods that come in those little gourmet pouches or cans. You pay $3 a package, and it’s basically just junk food with little nutritional value. Do some research, and have your vet read the ingredients list with you.” —A vet in California

Some veterinary drugs have a generic version that’s made for humans

Some veterinary drugs have a generic version that’s made for humansistock/Bradley Hebdon
“If your vet believes it’s a safe and effective alternative, you can get it from a human pharmacy and pay ten times less than you’d pay for the animal version. But recognize that there are legitimate reasons why the generic might not be appropriate for your pet.” —Patty Khuly, VMD

Content continues below ad

Don’t ever share your medicines with your pets

Don’t ever share your medicines with your petsistock/Sezeryadigar
“Unless your vet says it’s OK. One Tylenol will likely kill a cat.” —Amber Andersen, DVM

Using aggressive training tactics can cause serious behavior problems

Using aggressive training tactics can cause serious behavior problemsistock/Halfpoint
“Yes, dog whisperer Cesar Millan has turned some aggressive dogs around, but—please—don’t train your dog that way. Using aggressive tactics can cause serious behavior problems and may not be effective.” —A vet in California

A lot of pet medications are available at human pharmacies for lower prices than we charge.

A lot of pet medications are available at human pharmacies for lower prices than we charge.istock/PeopleImages
“A lot of pet medications are available at human pharmacies for lower prices than we charge. Walgreens even has a list of veterinary medicines for $4 per one-month dose. These are medicines that you would pay $20 or $30 for at your vet.”—MeiMei Welker, DVM

Content continues below ad

Buy a laser beam

Buy a laser beamistock/Wildroze
“Want to exercise your cat without getting off the couch? Get one of those little laser beams.” —Albert Ahn, DVM, a vet in Short Hills, New Jersey

Be careful when washing your pets

Be careful when washing your petsistock/InBtwntheBlinks
“I know you mean well when you vigorously lather your dog with shampoo and then vigorously rub him dry with the towel, but that can jam hairs under the skin like little splinters and cause horrible infections that are very painful. It’s especially a problem for short-coated dogs like Weimaraners, Boston terriers, pugs, Labs, and boxers.” —Nadine Znajda, DVM, a vet with BluePearl Veterinary Partners in Tampa, Florida

Brush your pet's teeth

Brush your pet's teethistock/debibishop
“If the plaque sprays and dental water additives actually worked, none of us would be telling you to brush your pet’s teeth.” —Dennis Leon, DVM

Content continues below ad

Take your cat to the vet in a plastic cat carrier with a removable top

Take your cat to the vet in a plastic cat carrier with a removable topistock/emariya
“And have your vet remove the lid for the exam. Your pet will feel more secure and be less likely to fight or try to flee.” —MeiMei Welker, DVM

Be realistic when buying a pet

Be realistic when buying a petistock/YunYulia
“If you live in a one-bedroom apartment with no patio and minimal space, and you’re gone ten hours a day at your job, a 100-pound Great Dane may not be the best choice for you. Maybe start with a goldfish?" —Amber Andersen, DVM

Become more interesting every week!

Get our Read Up newsletter

how we use your e-mail
We will use your email address to send you the newsletter each week, and we may also send you occasional special offers from Reader's Digest. For more information please read our privacy policy.

267 thoughts on “50 Secrets Your Veterinarian Won’t Tell You

  1. Number 20—im in the school in the caribbean- its accredited. i will get a DVM just like everyone else, and actually in a faster time frame probably should get your facts straight

    i read many comments…i cant believe there hasnt been a update about disregrading 20

  2. i only had a reading done with indianspell@hotmail.com and im starting to see results aready,just 20 minutes before my reading my ex contacted me and also the day after,it was just a casual conversation but the sound of his voice gave him away and that’s a sign cause i haven’t heard from him in a while,this all happened with just a reading.The reading was so accurate, indianspell@hotmail.com told me everything that was going on in my relationship without me telling him and what is needed in order to fix the problem,it was amazing.I would recommend indianspell@hotmail.com to anyone out there looking for help,dont waste any more time with other casters cause he’s the best and his secretary is amazing.I thank you.

  3. And total BULLSHIT on the kibble they sell/Raw movement. Raw diets are what dogs and cats ate LONG before we domesticated them. Their digestive systems are DESIGNED for raw foods. Anyone, ESPECIALLY a Vet is LYING. Learn about the RAW or B.A.R.F. movement that is DESIGNED for your pets optimum health. The pet food industry is a sham. Read the book “Food Pets Die For”. It will open your eyes and likely make you puke after you read what you have been feeding your animals. Raw all the way.

  4. I disagree with the overweight comment. I have been battling my size for decades, and I refuse to let my dog be that way. I control what they eat, and they eat properly and get exercise. My vet has always been impressed (properly, not “astounded) that I took the best care possible of my dog(s) when they were alive.
    I am getting a new dog soon, and I have zero intentions of ever letting them get overweight. Why would I ever do that to an animal that I love and loves me. Fighting with myself is one thing, because I have several factors against me. But *I* am the one who controls my dog, and I refuse to abuse them like that. They deserve the best, and that includes proper diet.

  5. As a practicing vet specialist in Europe, I find this article and the ensuing comments largely unprofessional. I am appalled at some of the ‘insider secrets’ that some vet techs and vets have shared within this article, though some vets have shared genuinely good advice. Some of these ‘professionals’ should at least have a reprimand from their workplace and governing body for the disdain with which they talk about their clients and, worse still, patients.

    As vets we work within a healthcare industry but also within a service industry.
    Sometimes this is a difficult balance to strike, but it must be done. Of paramount importance is the patient’s welfare; next the client’s concerns and then everything else. If a client or veterinarian cannot accept this order of things then they should reconsider their career or their pet ownership.
    I am grateful that within the UK we are rigidly regulated by our professional body, which would hopefully intervene before such unacceptable views were released into the public domain.

  6. This article is not written well at all. The format is wrong and titles of new topics don’t match the rest of the story.

  7. You would think a vet would know goldfish take space, especially the ones you get at fairs. They can get as big ad Koi, if not larger. Try a betta with 2.5 gallon tank, heater and filter.

  8. The Veterinarian instructed me to give my small dog HALF a pill twice daily. However, she carelessly cut them 2/3 by 1/3…. and did not tell us. I called her on it, but instead of giving me a fresh bottle of pills for ME to cut in HALF, she used accountability defenses to save her reputation at my expense. I want to know why people dodge taking accountability will you please tell me?

  9. Kind of worries me though how it seems like these vets realize the horrors of what is happening, but don’t actually do anything to stop it. Hmm…I am pretty disappointed :/

  10. #20’s author is a bit jaded. Two of the four Ross students in my class are board certified specialists now. One is an Equine Surgeon and the other was so qualified he skipped internship and went right to residency in Radiology.

  11. What the Hell with #27???? Indoor cats don’t need to be rabies vaccinated?? Who is this vet? She definately did not get into vet school. FYI, cats that live entirely indoors can still get Rabies from bats that get inside the house. I’ve seen this personally, and it’s absolutely devasting, emotionally and financially for families.

  12. I took my sick dog into the vet at 3-30am….they charged £350….they did nothing to help him – he deteriorated throughout the night – and they put him to sleep at 10-30am….

    That means – they took £150 for call-out + £50 for consultation – and he was ill and getting worse and worse…they gave him a shot and he went down hill – left on his own in a cage all night….

    If he had been treated when he was ill – he would still be alive now…

    Don’t slag the owners off – you are a sick breed of evil twats….

  13. MARRIAGE LOVE SPELL

    This white magic love spell is an elite spell that creates the strongest love energies for you to receive from your soul mate a marriage proposal. As I have a very important consideration for marriage and love, this spell has permanent effects of course. This spell does create an intense connection between two soul mates so that their relationship will last forever, once the two lovers are united by the bonds of marriage.pls contact him he is will to solved your marriage problem email contact dr.atitiokotemple@gmail.com posted by favour johnson

  14. This was even faster than I could dream of, dr.ehizojlespiritual(dr.ehizojlespiritualhome@gmail.com
    ). Thank you for taking time to listen to me and answering all my emails. I feel emotional strong again. My confidence is back and I see my future clearly. I am forever grateful for your help for re-uniting me with my old lover.

    mark Andersen, Seattle, new york

  15. Some of these are great and some of these are crap! Some of these people don’t have a title it’s just names so who the heck are they?! Just random people sharing their thoughts….?! Ketamine is a very common drug for sedation especially with cats. There’s nothing wrong with it. And I don’t know who the woman is who is even saying there is. I do agree with some of these being a technician myself, but some of these are crap and shouldn’t have been allowed on here.

  16. “If your animal is really sick, it’s better to bring him in during the morning.”
    I had to comment on this. I’ve had pets my entire life and for the most part, they’ve been incredibly healthy. However, accidents have happened. Before my parents got a cat, we had huge rat issues and we were using poison to get rid of them. We obviously tried to place it where our dog couldnt reach it yet one time he reached it, at around 10pm. Fortunately i was awake at that hour and went downstairs to find him shivering and almost paralyzed. If it wasn’t for our 24 hour vet he would have died that night.

  17. testimony

    Thank you! My husband stopped to fill the divorice papers and things are going much better now. As you said, I think that with time everything will be as it was before he met that evil woman. It’s good she’s out of the way now. God Bless You. you can also contact him at dodogodssolution@yahoo.com

  18. thinking on what to do to get back your ex lover. i want to tell you there is a solution to that is called homeofhelpingsolution there was were i have solution to my problem with the help of great Priest suzu, since my wife left me i have been in pains and sorrow but all that is gone now because i have my wife back with the power of Priest suzu if you need his help here is the email address homeofhelpingsolution@yahoo.com

  19. #25 I’ve been following several large raw feeding groups for a long time. Nobody got sick, nobody died. Kibble is being recalled left and right for salmonella contamination which is what anti-raw vets have been crying about with raw diets for years. There are some idiots just tossing their dog hamburger meat but for the most part owners are careful to formulate a balanced diet that is much better than normal kibble. Especially the Science Diet many vets recommend.

  20. #18 – I’m sorry but THAT is not a “no-kill” shelter. No-kill shelters only euthanize if an animal is very ill (usually at a vet’s recommendation), injured (again, per vet’s recommendation), or so aggressive that would pose a risk to public safety (usually as required by police order).

  21. This is a horribly misleading and poorly researched article that will do more damage than good. It is quite obvious, after reading the many comments posted, that the statement about the Caribbean veterinary school is rather damaging. But the comments about raw and No Kill are inaccurate, misleading, and damaging as well, among others. If this is truly the state of the profession, based on these quotes and the comments from vets in response here in addition to the accidents I’ve already experienced at visits, my concern is even greater about where I take my beloved dogs and cat. I will research even more before leading them into one of these businesses, and about any prescriptions or planned procedures, despite it being frowned upon by some vets. No different than I do with my own human prescriptions and procedures, and diet (typically encouraged for humans but not for our animals?).

  22. This article was not only enjoyable BUT ALSO most helpful!
    Do note, I found that a black soft large soft cloth carrier with both
    a zippered top and with sides the feline can see out from a much
    better solution than a metal or plastic carrier-which are rather
    like jails for the pet.  With the zippered top, I am able to unzip
    partially to calm my feline if necessary.  Always works –
    she’s alot less stressed; she’s alot happier when we get to the vet’s

  23. I have never seen Cesar Millan use “aggressive tactics” in his show? In fact its amazing how he doesnt even touch the animals in most his trainings. 

    1. Look on YouTube. There are videos where accredited trainers point out all his mistakes. He is not a positive reinforcement trainer which is what has proven to get the best results. He is a bully and he is not a dog expert at all!

  24. It isn’t true that an indoor cat doesn’t need a vaccine. It needs to get a different kind of vaccine for a lesser amount of diseases, yes. But if there’s panleukopenia in the neigbourhood, you migh as well bring it home on your shoes and infect your cat. There have been cases. It’s an extremely virulent and deadly virus.

  25. Dogs’ barking from houses is a disturbance and nuisance to new born babies, students learning their lessons, people trying to write, sing and draw things and to old sick people who try to rest and recuperate after going through the agonies of diseases. To pursue this problem unemotionally, it has to be agreed primarily that a dog’s bark is one of the ugliest sounds in this world. Certainly no one will compare it to the sweet bird songs emanating from bushes and tree foliages around our homes. When
    a newborn baby is sleeping, we have seen in our houses, everybody whispering in hushed up tones instead of speaking loud, lest the baby would be disturbed and woken up. Such is the tenderness and affection human society extends to its children. But what can we do when an insolent dog from our immediate neighbourhood chooses that particular time to bark and wail without stop and they in the house won’t do a thing? The new born babe for the first time feels insecurity in our hands, looses confidence and trust in family and human society, and grows up so for eighteen years against the unavoidable and inescapable background noise of dogs barking everywhere. Thus, after years we
    see the unruly youth standing there, irreverent, disobedient and angry to everyone! Whom to blame? We ask psychologists and psychiatrists for the reasons and they endlessly lecture on everything except the effect of incessant dog barking on infant minds, in their undecipherable jargon. Once we had something called silent nights which produced poets, playwrights, authors, artists and a disciplined generation. That time is now past, due to the insatiable lust of a few in our society for the pleasures from dogs. Society or disease or death, they will find excellent explanations and make unbendable laws for their dogs.

  26. Most people do not like social criticism, especially if it is their relationship with their dogs that is being questioned. But the job of a social critic is to analyze and question things whether people like it or not, and face the consequences. Diseases spread from dogs to women, from women to children, from children to all in their school and from schools to the entire human society has reached a stage of being a threat to the world. Therefore the threats from dogs to human society is to be analyzed and studied, whether it is pleasant to read and listen to or not; it is a necessity. Various horrible diseases caused from bedding with dogs and how dogs serve as the animal host to various Zoonosis viruses responsible for Dengue Congo Q fevers and the like, are the first things that ought to have been taught people by veterinarians.  When cycles of these fevers recently shook and stormed through various regions of the world, everybody talked about killing mosquitoes which was easy. None talked about dogs in whose body these viruses resided and multiplied, because talking about it was unsafe. Governments, Health Departments, Doctors and Scientists took after the carrier and burned millions instead of telling the world who the breeding host of these zoonosis viruses was. It was rats that
    destroyed England and Rome centuries ago by way of plague and devoured millions of humans and animals. Now it is the turn of dogs.

    A peaceful and quiet life is everyone’s right. Like loudspeakers and automobile horns, dogs’ incessant barking from a house also is a public nuisance. Our dog barking from our house may be sweet music to our ears, but to our neighbours it is utter public nuisance. We all depend on good inter-relations in our society to make our life possible and peaceful. That dogs afford us security is a wrong conviction. It is because there are other houses nearby and around our houses that our houses are not being broken into and our daughters and valuables are not being taken away by thieves, marauders and rogues, as were happening in the barbarian times. It is not due to the presence of this puny little beast in our premises that our houses are not being robbed regularly. A dog can effectively be prevented from
    interfering in a robbery by just throwing to it a piece of sticky halva candy. We shamelessly enjoy the unique security offered to us by society but when the question of the importance of our dog comes, we value the wayward freedom of our dog more important than the peace and tranquillity of our
    society. We at least have to repay, as a token of gratitude, the overall protection and security afforded us by society by not making our fellow human beings torment and suffer because of the restlessness of our puny animal.

  27. As a Veterinarian by trade, I find this ‘article’ to be
    extremely offensive. The remorseless vigor with witch these peoples’ comments
    were used against them and their fellow Veterinarians further instills the
    massive distrust toward the entire world of veterinary based media coverage. These
    people run around and shamelessly shove cameras in the faces of the very cats, dogs,
    and various exotic pets that make it possible for them to have their pathetic
    and disgraceful careers. It will be an incredible shame if the jerkwater that
    pretended to write this has any type of financial or personal success as a
    result.

  28. As a Veterinarian by trade, I find this ‘article’ to be
    extremely offensive. The remorseless vigor with witch these peoples’ comments
    were used against them and their fellow Veterinarians further instills the
    massive distrust toward the entire world of veterinary based media coverage. These
    people run around and shamelessly shove cameras in the faces of the very cats, dogs,
    and various exotic pets that make it possible for them to have their pathetic
    and disgraceful careers. It will be an incredible shame if the jerkwater that
    pretended to write this has any type of financial or personal success as a
    result.

  29. Most of these are interesting and accurate, but the advice to not vaccinate your cats is dangerous. Its not unheard of for wild animals suchas bats to find their way into a family home and expose your cat. Cats might also sccidently get loose at some point. Worse yet, if your cat ever bites someone and has not been vaccinated for rabies, the animal may be quarantined for 6 months or even euthanized. If you choose not give you cat Feline Leukemia vaccines or distemper vaccines thats fine, but not giving your cat regular rabies vaccines endangers your cat and your family.. 

  30. how do you cut the hair from around a tishi-su eyes when they want let you touch their face.this cute little dog was given to me.he was already grown,the owner deceases.what can i do to cut his hair without taking him to a vet

  31. INDOOR CAT STILL NEED TO BE VACCINATED!!!  There was a cat a few months ago that was indoor only and tested positive for rabies somewhere in the south.  Bats carry rabies and you really can’t control if a bat gets into your home so vaccinate your animals!

  32. Is it True that if you leave a dog alone for 3 days without eating will it try to eat you?

  33. i am hear to give testimony of how i got back my husband, we got married for more than 9 years and have gotten two kids. thing were going well with us and we are always happy. until one day my husband started to behave in a way i could not understand, i was very confused by the way he treat me and the kids. later that month he did not come home again and he called me that he want a divorce, i asked him what have i done wrong to deserve this from him, all he was saying is that he want a divorce that he hate me and do not want to see me again in his life, i was mad and also frustrated do not know what to do,i was sick for more than 2 weeks because of the divorce. i love him so much he was everything to me without him my life is incomplete. i told my sister and she told me to contact a spell caster, i never believe in all this spell casting of a thing. i just want to try if something will come out of it. i contacted ayelala shrine for the return of my husband to me, they told me that my husband have been taken by another woman, that she cast a spell on him that is why he hate me and also want us to divorce. then they told me that they have to cast a spell on him that will make him return to me and the kids, they castes the spell and after 1 week my husband called me and he told me that i should forgive him, he stetted to apologize on phone and said that he still live me that he did not know what happen to him that he left me. it was the spell that he ayelala shrine castes on him that make him comeback to me today,me and my family are now happy again today. thank you ayelala shrine for what you have done for me i would have been nothing today if not for your great spell. i want you my friends who are passing through all this kind of love problem of getting back their husband, wife , or ex boyfriend and girlfriend to contact ayelalashrine@gmail.com and you will see that your problem will be solved. baries 

  34. i just want to share my experience and testimony here.. i was married for 6
    years to my husband and all of a sudden, another woman came into the picture..
    he started hailing me and he was abusive..but i still loved him with all my
    heart and wanted him at all cost…then he filed for divorce..my whole life was
    turning apart and i didn’t know what to do..he moved out of the house and
    abandoned the kids.. so someone told me about trying spiritual means to get my
    husband back and introduced me to a spell caster…so i decided to try it
    reluctantly..although i didn’t believe in all those things… then when he did
    the special prayers and spell, after 2days, my husband came back and was
    pleading..he had realized his mistakes..i just couldn’t believe it.. anyways we
    are back together now and we are happy..in case anyone needs this man, his
    email address abuluspiritualtemple@yahoo.com his spells is for a better life.
    again his email is abuluspiritualtemple@yahoo.com

  35. Hello dr,kokotemple. I recieved an order from you a couple of months ago. I would just like to thank you very much as both talismans have really helped me. I had ordered the Mystique Talisman and the Spirit Calling Talisman which have both been very effective. I will be in touch within the next few weeks to order some more items from you. Meantime once gain many thanks to you and your special powers.his email address is dr,kokotemple@gmail.com
     

  36. this list scares me, it sounds like most of these vets and vet techs only care about $. Not in making the pet comfortable or the owner comfortable. How awful to think that they think the person that is paying them to take care of their animal is in “their way”.

  37. I am no vet or anything, but I did had a young cat that developed thin hair around his ear’s, brown patches around between his eyes and ears (where I can see), he wasn’t eating well, just barely, but I did noticed cat food in the water bowel, I didn’t know if he was dropping them in the water to chew better??
    Well, weeks later ( I couldn’t remember) I decided to take him to the vet to check him out ask questions, see the balding area with off color patches, The vet said the cat has food allergies and told me to feed him fish and chicken diet and avoid cow. he showed me the different bags of cat food on the shelf that has fish and chicken protein, I bought it (very expensive while having a hard time finding permanent jobs in 2009, but still very expensive anyways). He told me to come back after a month to check him again.
    The new cat food works, he is eating, then 2 days before he has to go back to the vet, a vehicle hit him across my boyfriend’s house, I was very very devastated.
    Not all vets are the same guy’s, but one thing I didn’t like the vet was, he keeps cutting into me while I was talking to him.

  38. Number 17 is SO TRUE! When my dog was about 6 or 8 months old, he had a procedure done at a specialty hospital. This was not a vet school but they had students or new graduates there. It was just a specialty hospital. They had to shave the fur on his neck to get blood from the vein in the neck. He came home home with half of his ear shaved off! I was soooo mad but I couldn’t say or do anything! What must’ve happened was he was startled and moved. An experienced vet would NOT have made this mistake! For the past decade now I make sure that students, new vets or trainees are NOT touching any of my babies!

  39. I have raised trained field trial dogs since i982.   had to put down 5 dogs in the last 30 years.  BUT I have only had them put down when cancer or other physical problems caused them too much pain ( I had them on pain medication)  I still have three dogs; one of which I paid $6,000.00 for metal hips to be put in and he has to be on special foods so he doesn’t get arthritis – he is  just 15 months old!!!

  40. I’ve got to agree with everyone else. This supposed vet from California who listed number 20 is an imbecile. Take a look at all the other posts by said individual, I think they must have a sweet deal cut with some pharmaceutical company or something. Would have liked to hear less from them and more from someone with real insight rather than the script put out by crappy food companies like science diet, or pharmacutical companies that try to inundate your pet’s system with toxins in the name of profit.

  41. well i want to become a vetanarian because i love animals soooo much but i dont want to put them down

  42. I just wanted to say thank you SOOOOOOOO much!Dr okosodo You are the best!  The love of my life came back within 2 days of the spell.  Now we are happier then we ever were before.  I just can’t thank you enough for evrything.  If i ever need any spells in the future i am coming straight to you okosodotemple@gmail.com

  43. My ex-husband and I had always manged to stay friendly after our divorce, but I always wanted to get back together with him, and he was never sure. So, I thought it was about time I MADE him sure! All it took was to contact you and a request for a specific love spell, and win ex back spell’s powers began to work their magic. My spell is working because guess what: My “ex” is soon to be my husband again! This is nothing short of a miracle. Thank you, win ex back spell. Words are not enough.contact the great man on winexbackspell@gmail.com

  44. hello people at here this is a testimony i will love to share with everybody out there i lost my job and my husband to another woman and ever since then i have not been my self.i tell my friend the story and she introduce me to this spell cast winexbackspell@gmail.com you could not believe what happen my mess was cleaned up i got a new job and my husband come back to me.and i now live happily.once again all thanks to winexbackspell@gmail.com

  45. 20. “Your vet may not have gotten into vet school! Vets who can’t
    get into traditional U.S. veterinary programs due to bad grades and
    poor test scores often go to for-profit schools in the Caribbean, where,
    basically, if you can pay the tuition, you get in.”—A vet in California.

    I have to disagree with this comment. Although I am not in the Caribbean I am in vet school internationally and I have gotten this “you are not as good as me” attitude whenever I come back to North America to do placements. There seems to be this mindset that if you attend any of the Caribbean and international veterinary schools, if means you didn’t make it into the vet school of your choice due to bad grades and essentially we’re “paying for our degrees”. It’s bull sh**! I graduated top of my class in undergrad, but the only reason why the vet school didn’t want me was because I was lacking one course they wanted me to take. So I applied internationally instead of doing more undergrad courses, and it has been the best decision of my life since.

    I really believe that this was a horrible thing to say. Yes, perhaps academically SOME may not have been as high standing as some of your classmates in “traditional U.S. veterinary programs” however to lump them all together and say “your vet may not have gotten into vet school…. due to bad grades and poor test scores… if [they] can pay the tuition, [they] can get in” is not supporting your present and future colleagues. And, there’s more to being a vet than just marks. I have classmates who are brilliant, but sometimes what a client and a patient needs is someone with compassion, patience and understanding and just a bit of a more social touch, which no matter how academic you are, you can’t always be taught how to do that.

    So please, don’t judge your colleagues and the students who have come from these universities. It’s unfair and completely unnecessary and just perpetuates this stereotype, which is false for a lot of people who do attend these universities.

  46. Ketamine is not 1970’s! Its used ALL the time as an emergency sedative in cats or as pain relief as a constant infusion.

  47. MiamiEddy, I agree your vet should wasg their hands, (and maybe they did before they entered your exam room and you just didn’t see that-I have NEVER worked with a veterinarian who didn’t wash their hands right after a visit or procedure and BEFORE entering the next exam room,) but you are a jerk.  You obviously felt this way without bothering to speak up at all about it while at the office or ask your vet if they had washed their hands, and used it as an excuse to get a free vet visit dishonestly and after the fact.  You should have spoken up BEFORE you took up the vet’s time and let them perform services on your pet if you really cared about the issue, rather than waiting till everything was done and paid for, then being sneaky and canceling your payment from home.  I don’t feel bad for you at all.  I guess your pet floats above ground in a hermetically-sealed bubble, too…

  48. As a longtime veterinary nurse, I disagree based on what I’ve learned from my work with other doctors.  Just because your cat stays indoors doesn’t mean you aren’t exposing it to the respiratory diseases their distemper vaccine protects against-you can bring the disease in on your shoes, clothes-and many municipalities, cities, countries require an up to date rabies vaccination for even indoor cats.
    Having your cat up to date on its shots (generally rabies and distemper are enough for an indoor cat, and can be done every three years once the initial booster is done) also makes it possible for your indoor cat to be boarded on short notice if you ever need to do that (I don’t know of any reputable kennels that will take in unvaccinated pets without special medical accommodations-distemper vaccines are not fully effective for 10 days; rabies vaccines are not considered effective for 30 days.)  In particular, being rabies-vaccinated reduces the likelihood of your pet having to be euthanized if it bites someone, and lessens the amount of time and severity of a quarantine if it bites someone.  It also protects them against rabies if a bat or other rabies vector gets in your house.Leukemia and feline AIDS (not the same as human AIDS!!!) vaccines are the ones indoor cats don’t need, but if they are exposed to cats that DO go outdoors-one cat is strictly indoors, one goes out; you live in an apartment complex with outdoor cats and your neighbor’s outdoor cat likes to hang out outside the screen door your cat birdwatches from-disease transmission is far more likely from more direct contact, though) then you should consider feline leukemia and AIDS vaccines as well.  Feline leukemia is spread primarily via fluids; feline AIDS is spread primarily through bites and is harder to transmit.Indoor cats should ideally be on year-round flea and tick preventatives, too (though this is really one of those things that doesn’t matter as much for them) but particularly if they live with any dogs or again, other cats, who go out.  Year-round heartworm prevention even through cold months (I have seen live mosquitoes in February even in New England!) is also a must for indoor cats-mosquitoes do get inside the home, and while there is effective (yet pricey, lengthy, restrictive, and potentially uncomfortable) treatment for heartworm in dogs, there really is no good treatment for cats, and due to their size, one heartworm can be enough to kill a feline.Care should be taken by veterinary staff to reduce vaccination reactions (pets with known reactions get antihistamines prior to vaccination, and if problems persist, then vaccination recommendations may change;) reduce the possibility of tumors that VERY RARELY develop by using the best vaccines and administering them low on the legs for vaccines that go at leg sites, etc.  (This is so that if a vaccine-related tumor did develop, the pet would be less likely to require total limb amputation near vaccine sites.)  There are standard protocols for what vaccines go where so other vets would know what vaccine caused the problem if the owner was unsure, and vets and staff giving vaccines should be required to write up detailed vaccine notes in the medical chart stating what vaccine was given and where, along with serial numbers from the vaccine (many clinics put the actual label from the vaccine vial right into the medical chart.)  If problems arise, the manufacturer can be contacted and the vaccine traced and batches recalled if necessary. Manufacturers generally pick up the cost of any vaccine-related issues like tumors as well, as rare as they are, though good documentation is key for that.

    Most vaccine reactions are NOT life-threatening, but owners should stick around for at least 20-30 minutes after their pet is vaccinated, especially after vaccines they have never had before, to ensure that any severe reactions occur at the doctors office when possible (most anaphylactic reactions occur within 10-45 minutes of vaccination.) (Ferrets are a whole other ballgame with regards to vaccines, legal status of rabies vaccines, vaccine reactions.)

    Responsible owners who want to reduce the number of vaccines their pets get should pay attention to due dates for boosters and get them done before the vaccines expire to ensure they get on rotating and extended vaccine schedules whenever possible.  The latest distemper vaccines for cats and dogs can be given every three years, once boostered one time, barring lapses, and rabies as well (and once your pet has had their first 3-year vaccine in places that allow them legally, it’s always considered a 3-year vaccine, even if you miss a year or are late by a month or so.)    You can then stagger the vaccines.FYI!

  49.  I am humbled by reading the many challenges other men and women are faceing  with their marriage life,having problems with their spouse as I am on day eleven of The love spell i cast on my woman which i ordered from the winexbackspell@gmail.com  the spell really make me feel reliefe as i am now happy with my marriage,anything i say now she believes me eventhough i lied she believed me than ever. God has continued to give me strength each day as I go on this marriage journey and I want everyone who reads this to know I lift you up to your faith.never to loose hope take a chance and tell the winexbackspell@gmail.com your problems this will give you daily encouragement,so do not sit down and think all hope is lost,do something to make the spirit proud of you,win back your relationship.  May the spirit bless each of you courageous enough to win back your relationship.

  50. sir or mam i have bitten by dog German Sheppard yesterday and till now i have not taken vaccciantion .and the dog s 6 month old and he has been vaccinated .so wt should i do now
     

  51. Have to say I disagree with #27. Was a case not long ago of a cat around here. Third floor apartment. Indoor only. Rabies risk is 0 right? Vet told them not to vaccinate (I would have too). Oh wait — did I forget to mention the cat went out on the balcony? Bat flew in, bit the cat, and infected it. Weird stuff happens, and your pet can’t tell you about it after the fact. When wrong means potentially death for the owner, I don’t mess around (and I do talk about injection site tumors…)

  52. @ #32 – Completely erroneous.  In fact, most corporate vet hospitals have the ability to buy equipment, medications, and supplies in bulk, greatly bringing down the overhead costs.  These savings actually drive DOWN the costs for the clients.  Not to mention that the majority of private practices also pay their veterinarians based at least partly on productivity.

  53. #31 Who says it’s illegal to give half doses?  With many animals, especially small ones, a half dose is safe. Besides, most animals don’t need vaccines, especially annual vaccines. They’re overwhelming the immune system. Many animals die because of vaccines.

  54. #31 Who says it’s illegal to give half doses?  With many animals, especially small ones, a half dose is safe. Besides, most animals don’t need vaccines, especially annual vaccines. They’re overwhelming the immune system. Many animals die because of vaccines.

  55. #25 is nonsense. Use commen sense when handling raw meat. Wash your hands! Where’s the proof that the raw food diet killed the patients? Animals aren’t humans, they don’t react to e coli and other bacteria the way people do. Do your research. A raw food diet is healthier. The pet food companies have done a wonderful job of brainwashing people. What did people feed their animals 100 years ago?  Think, people, think!

    1. Bonza,
      Thank you for your comments. It’s unfortunate that so many vets put a pay off before pet health. There are so many advances being made with regards to alternative health in human medicine, it’s a shame that the same cannot be said for animal medicine.

  56. #25 is nonsense. Use commen sense when handling raw meat. Wash your hands! Where’s the proof that the raw food diet killed the patients? Animals aren’t humans, they don’t react to e coli and other bacteria the way people do. Do your research. A raw food diet is healthier. The pet food companies have done a wonderful job of brainwashing people. What did people feed their animals 100 years ago?  Think, people, think!

  57. rachel simpson (she contributed to the article): for the record – ketamine is still widely used in HUMAN anesthesia. and ISO and SEVO are often hard to get on-board a patient that won’t sit there and let you put the mask on and HOLD it on. You sound pretty ignorant there. Inhaled anesthetics have a completely different method of action than IV anesthetics and you just compared apples to steaks. Sounds like you went to one of these “pay-for-play” schools in the Caribbean previously mentioned?

    1. No, CRNA15, it sounds like she doesn’t have any degree. If she had gone to one of the excellent  Caribbean vet schools she would have learned about the benefits of NMDAR antagonists and about the lack of analgesia in gas anesthesia.

  58. Thank you for offering this discussion. I have been seething about #39 for months after I read this article.  I think Ms. Simpson needs a continuing ed course on the benefits of ketamine. Is she suggesting that you should only use isoflurane and sevoflurane for anesthesia?

  59. you plz you cant even spell right dude bye that made my day thats the best joke of the year@Crazyjeramy:disqus

  60. do you start every sentence with Man well im to old for this nonsense peace as you would say@ @Crazyjeramy:disqus 

  61. i am such a animal person this is the website for a anaper thats what i call myself  @ crazy jeramy man your so stupid didnt mean to say but its true punk your so stupid man

  62. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn u dont know just got this compurter lur it ser much bruh lur dizz werrsite man

  63. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn u dont know just got this compurter lur it ser much bruh lur dizz werrsite man

  64. i love this website all this stuff is so interesting and kinda true i love it

  65. Vets who share the idea of number 20 are very narrow minded and niave.  I go to a state school, but I know many who go to a Caribbean school, and each one of them are very smart and talented.  If I would avoid anyone, it would be the vet in California who is obviously uneducated. 

  66. You forgot…

    “Bottom line. This is a business, and we want your money.”

  67. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  68. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  69. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  70. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  71. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  72. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  73. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  74. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  75. Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.

  76. Hello Michelle,

    Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite due to gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.
    Moreover, tuition fee in the carribean are same if not cheaper than Us school in some occasion.

    Being readers are very impressionable, I hope they dont mistreat and look down on vets who acquired their degree internationally due to this misconception. International schools are capable if not more equipped on some occasions in producing highly capable and compassionate doctors with a more grounded worldly view.
    Paulynne

  77. Hello Michelle,

    Your article about vet secrets caught my attention especially since I am a pre-vet student. Comment #20 has got a lot of attention because it is unfair and misleading. There are only 28 vet schools in the US which greatly under serve the big demand for veterinarians particularly in the food industry and research field. US vet schools are mandated to reserve at least  50%  the limited highly coveted seats to in state residents , 25% to states they have contracts with and the remainder few for the rest of the US which comprises about 70-80% of total applicant. To meet this requirement, US vet schools have LOWER requirements ( lower GPA and GRE scores) for in state residents so that they can meet the quota. Some are so low as to 2.8 GPA  while others offer “special consideration” to their residents. 
    This being said makes the comment very unfair and greatly skewed. Attaining your degree in US school does not gaurantee you are the finest and brightest, it can be simply be the right state residency. Students from states who are not fortunate to have their own vet state school excel and strive extremely hard to improve their chance of being admitted despite due to gigantic odds  being against them. And due to state policy, many bright and highly capable and dedicated students leave the comfort of US to pursue their desires career because they lived in the “wrong state”.
    Moreover, tuition fee in the carribean are same if not cheaper than Us school in some occasion.

    Being readers are very impressionable, I hope they dont mistreat and look down on vets who acquired their degree internationally due to this misconception. International schools are capable if not more equipped on some occasions in producing highly capable and compassionate doctors with a more grounded worldly view.
    Paulynne

  78. On #18… If a shelter is sending its animals to a vet to be killed because they are not getting them adopted out, that is NOT a no-kill shelter. 

  79. I think that one point everybody here is missing is the incredible ‘outside the US’ bias. All defenders point to Ross and SGU’s AVMA accreditation against RD’s claim. So….. the hundreds of vet schools throughout the world without AVMA accreditation (including those who never sought it), are somehow deficient because of this? All the world leading veterinary specialists must be struggling to sleep knowing that there work is all for nought because they are not AVMA accredited!

  80. I disagree with number 20. I have met many talented and knowledgable grads from Ross and SGU. The real issue at hand is why are vet schools opening up and becoming accredited throughout north America and the Caribbean when the number of new grads is outnumbering the job opportunities. I hope the AVMA is conducting some research in this matter and schools stop robbing people of their money.

  81. I wouldn’t have anyone but a Cornell Graduate for my pets. Learned that by experience and fact One tip I learned that has helped alot is when they are getting a shot to  scratch the top of their head back and forth with light pressure with your pointer finger and it distracts them from the shot/pain…  My dog is alive with Cancer at 16 yrs old (cancer for 4 1/2 yrs and still here thanks to Cornell NY Vets!) My best tip is to check their credentials even for just an exam and shots! It may save their life! Also another tip is never believe that fatty tumors are NOT cancer. This is what happened to us…. Make sure you get the BIOPSY!

    1. Would you care to discuss why you believe (key word) that Cornell graduates are the only reputable veterinarians? Your [unsupported (even supported, if that were the case)] claim is drastically ignorant.

  82. There are some rare pearls of wisdom in here, but unfortunately, very few readers will be able to find them amidst the wash of misinformation presented here.  Pet owners, please take everything you read here with a grain of salt and discuss them with your veterinarians if you have questions or concerns. 

    Medicine and care of your pet is an art – it’s not an exact science.  At the end of the day, make sure you are talking with a vet (or hey, maybe two!) who will take the time to get you FACTS instead of opinions and can discuss the pros/benefits and cons/risks of diets, activities, and approaches to healthcare.  Make an informed decision!  If your vet isn’t offering you options, or willing to get you the information or referral (*gasp!*) you need, get a new vet. 

    For example – raw diets were mentioned here.  Are there risks?  Absolutely, and some veterinarians have strong opinions on the matter, as evidenced here.  If you are not interested in feeding your pet formulated kibble, then find a veterinarian who will help you formulate your own balanced diet and control risks in an educated manner.  Get a few opinions – it just means more information for you!

  83. I was appalled at RD’s publication of comment #20. I have had the pleasure of working with many Ross and SGU grads and have only known them to be exceedingly competent and well rounded. For RD to publish a comment like that is libelous! I have always enjoyed perusing Reader’s Digest, but now that I know how little research and care they put into what they publish, I will think twice about ever picking it up again.

  84. I was appalled at RD’s publication of comment #20. I have had the pleasure of working with many Ross and SGU grads and have only known them to be exceedingly competent and well rounded. For RD to publish a comment like that is libelous! I have always enjoyed perusing Reader’s Digest, but now that I know how little research and care they put into what they publish, I will think twice about ever picking it up again.

  85. #25… that is the most IGNORANT thing I have heard today!  A “raw foods” diet DOES NOT MEAN RAW MEATS!  Omg.. it means organic uncooked vegetables primarily! Unprocessed organic foods!  Whoever made that statement is CLUELESS!

    1. You’re kidding, right? Dogs are CARNIVORES. Not obligate carnivores but still CARNIVORES. It seems to me that the clueless one is clearly you. I hope you don’t have a dog…and that you never will.

  86. There are some things for which it is good that the vet won’t tell us, like when the vet doesn’t know what he would be talking about, such as raw diets.

  87. There are some things for which it is good that the vet won’t tell us, like when the vet doesn’t know what he would be talking about, such as raw diets.

  88. This comment is for #20. This remark is blatantly pure ignorance. I am a veterinarian who graduated from a Caribbean school, and I am an internal medicine specialist now. I went on my own accord, and I would not change my education for anything. I had a 3.7 gpa and 10 years of veterinary experience when I went. I was not incompetent, unlike the “vet in California” that made this comment. Also, veterinarians who graduate from a Caribbean school have to prove their education is equivalent to state schools by taking a ridiculously expensive and grueling 3 day practical exam. I would LOVE to see some of the state school students pass this test, because pretty sure they wouldn’t be able to do it. Also the Caribbean schools have the HIGHEST passing scores on the National veterinary licensing board exams than ANY of the state schools. That is what I call impressive. There is nothing wrong with your veterinarian being from a one of these Caribbean schools. Personally, the education may be even better than some of the state schools now.

  89. Rachel Simpson needs to visit different dog parks.  I’ve been taking mine to dog parks for years for exercise and social interaction.  Best place for dogs to learn their place in the world.
    “I understand the value of dog parks, but I personally wouldn’t take my dog there. We see a lot of dogs who were injured at dog parks.”—Rachel Simpson, a vet tech at Adobe Animal Hospital in Los Altos, California.

  90. Number twenty is insulting, inflammatory, and horribly misleading, and the veterinarian who wrote it obviously knew such to be the case or s/he would have included a name with the comment.  I, for one, graduated Magna Cum Laude from a competitive private liberal arts university which I attended on scholarship after receiving over a 4.0 grade point average in high school.  I didn’t even apply to stateside veterinary schools, because I was pursuing veterinary medicine as a nontraditional student who had already worked as a marine biologist (also a very competitive field) for seven years.  I wanted to be with other like-minded students, to be on the water, and to continue to live a life off the beaten path.  My classmates were there for all kinds of reasons, and they are among the most motivated, compassionate people and veterinarians you will ever meet.  For whatever reason you choose your veterinarian, the school from which s/he graduated should not be a consideration.  My classmates and I, in addition to passing the same national and state board examinations all US students have to pass in order to practice in the States, also had to pass another written examination PLUS a six thousand dollar (paid by the students, or with further student loans), three-day comprehensive practical examination covering ALL species in order to be eligible to practice in the United States.  Some schools in the States don’t even require fourth year/clinical students to treat a species outside their stated area of interest.  I’m not saying that is bad necessarily, but to imply that students who went to school internationally, no matter if it was in the Caribbean or elsewhere, are somehow less competent veterinarians is unfair, undermines our proud profession, draws into question the integrity of a magazine who would repeat it without citation, and makes the so-called colleague who said such a thing look worse than any of us.  Any veterinarian worth listening to would recommend a client judge for himself how a veterinarian treats his/her clients and patients.  There are good veterinarians and there are less than stellar ones, but going to a foreign school guarantees neither.  Furthermore, both Ross and St. George’s University were recently accredited by the AVMA, having met the requirements of all other accredited veterinary schools in the United States and abroad, so the inclusion of this statement is especially disappointing.

  91. Number twenty is insulting, inflammatory, and horribly misleading, and the veterinarian who wrote it obviously knew such to be the case or s/he would have included a name with the comment.  I, for one, graduated Magna Cum Laude from a competitive private liberal arts university which I attended on scholarship after receiving over a 4.0 grade point average in high school.  I didn’t even apply to stateside veterinary schools, because I was pursuing veterinary medicine as a nontraditional student who had already worked as a marine biologist (also a very competitive field) for seven years.  I wanted to be with other like-minded students, to be on the water, and to continue to live a life off the beaten path.  My classmates were there for all kinds of reasons, and they are among the most motivated, compassionate people and veterinarians you will ever meet.  For whatever reason you choose your veterinarian, the school from which s/he graduated should not be a consideration.  My classmates and I, in addition to passing the same national and state board examinations all US students have to pass in order to practice in the States, also had to pass another written examination PLUS a six thousand dollar (paid by the students, or with further student loans), three-day comprehensive practical examination covering ALL species in order to be eligible to practice in the United States.  Some schools in the States don’t even require fourth year/clinical students to treat a species outside their stated area of interest.  I’m not saying that is bad necessarily, but to imply that students who went to school internationally, no matter if it was in the Caribbean or elsewhere, are somehow less competent veterinarians is unfair, undermines our proud profession, draws into question the integrity of a magazine who would repeat it without citation, and makes the so-called colleague who said such a thing look worse than any of us.  Any veterinarian worth listening to would recommend a client judge for himself how a veterinarian treats his/her clients and patients.  There are good veterinarians and there are less than stellar ones, but going to a foreign school guarantees neither.  Furthermore, both Ross and St. George’s University were recently accredited by the AVMA, having met the requirements of all other accredited veterinary schools in the United States and abroad, so the inclusion of this statement is especially disappointing.

  92. According to experts the average dog cost their home owner $500.00 per year in food, vet care and other items..before you get your new dog think about it..$500.00?

  93. Uh, indoor cats not even vaccinated for rabies?  Is she nuts?  Rabies is fatal… what happens if the cat escapes outside?  Or a bat comes in?  It’s better to vaccinate once every 3 years than to risk a fatal disease.  Stupid.

  94. I saw this at the supermarket check out and made my husband buy it by saying “What aren’t you telling me, honey?”

  95. RD, I once found you as a credible and reputable source.  Obviously you fail at researching the information you print, since you had the audacity to print such inaccurate information in regards to #20.  
    I am a proud graduate of Ross University and never once in my career have I ever felt ill-prepared, incompetent or helpless in veterinary medicine.  I cannot believe you printed such an erroneous statement, and according to the comments below neither can others.  

  96. As a proud and successful graduate of Ross University, I was extremely offended and disappointed in Readers Digest for their publication of #20. Carribean veterinary school are in no way a lesser education than any of the US veterinary schools! By having a statement like this published, a continuing and frustrating myth is being perpetuated to many of our best clients. Many of us Caribbean students uprooted ourselves from our homes, families, and friends to spend years dedicated solely to the study of veterinary medicine, all the while accumulating astronomical debt to pursue a career because we have a passion and love for the animals we work with. If anything, I think this is something to be commended and respected. Readers Digest should be ashamed of publishing something without doing the research behind potentially damaging and entirely untrue statements. 

  97. Not all no-kill shelters do what Jessica said. Most that I know of are limited-admission – if the shelter doesn’t have space, they don’t accept the pet. That is how they are able to remain no-kill. 

  98. I have 2 Jack Russells both 5 years old born one month apart. A male and a female, not brother and sister. The plan was to breed them but there’s a problem. They both matured, she went into heat and he went crazy for her as expected but nothing came of it. After that her period or heat all but disappeared and the male dog doesn’t show any interest in that regard. I also noticed one other thing and it makes me more than a little suspicious, my male dog’s testicles appears to have atrophied.
    My vet always gave my dogs their annual check up and shots in my presence until they matured. After that my dogs were ushered into the back room. Only after this did my dogs noticeably change. My suspicion is this, the vet nutered my dogs without my permission. Since my male dog is intact I suspect possible chemical castration.
    Is this a possibilty, would a vet do this? While I have no intention of confronting or accusing them of harming my dogs,  I am determined not to let them out of my sight again.
    So again my question is: would a vet alter a dog without the owners permission? 

    1. NO! No vet should do anything without your knowledge and consent.  Plus trust me they would of charged you for that.  If you truly don’t trust your vet why would you continue to go to them?  It’s very common procedure to remove the animal for treatments since most do better without their owners.  Plus owners get rather stressed watching procedures done.  Do you have money for a c-section? X-rays and prenatal care?  What if the mother dies in birth you willing to bottle feed every couple of hours for weeks? How will you ensure the offspring go to responsible owners?  Will you start vaccines before you get rid of them?  What happens if one or more get sick?  What happens when your female gets pyometra? Or mastitis?  Or your male gets aggressive because of testosterone or gets cancer?  
      Now be a responsible human and get your *&^% dogs spayed and neutered!! 

    2. No a good Veterinarian would not do this.  Additionally, it would be near impossible to do a spay in the time allotted for treatments, and it would be noticeable, what with incisions, shaving, the after effects of the anesthesia, etc.  Chemical castration drugs are not commonly used, I wold be surprised if your vet had them.  There are myriad reasons why she may not have conceived/is not showing heat. etc.  If you are concerned, it would be wise to have both animals checked by a veterinarian you do trust for more probably infertility problems.

    3.  They go out of heat…and your male dog will lose interest as she moves out of her estrus cycle which only lasts a few days.  Thus, why he was not in the mood for her & she was not in the mood for him.  Research if you’re going to keep your animals intact.

  99. #20 is baloney.  Ross & SGU are great schools for vets.  My son is going to Ross and you would not believe how challenging that school is.  That comment is scandalous and  cowardly.  Why would Readers Digest put an item like that in the list???  You could have easily made it “49 things…”!!!  Why would you put such a lame, anonymous(!), insulting comment like that in there???  Did Michelle Crouch check into any of these 50 comments?
    SIGNED -Bill Wagner, St.Albans VT

  100. Why is it then, they advertise flea meds to be so much cheaper when their they same price on line as at the vets? plus you have to pay shipping? First time ever, I bought 6  monts for $70+ from Pet smart. Best way to go.

  101. Raw fed pets since 2000. 2 kids hardly ever sick. Pets, never ever sick. My vet, wonderful and loves my pets and their raw diet.

  102. What vets need to tell you – Vaccines are killing your pets health, kibble is killing your pets health. Getting pets from irresponsible places like willy nilly breeders and pets stores is killing our pets, not socilizing our pets before 12 weeks old is killing our pets. This is just a fluff article.

  103. i have read this article in its entirety.

    as a retired doctor, i take umbrage at the ‘do as i say, not as i do’ attitude you’re posting.

    basically, you’ve just printed an article with anecdotes that will give permission for people to feed their dogs chocolate, that it’s okay to not get their dogs licensed,

    that the vets who get their licenses from the caribbean, so they are not a vet..is just wrong and not truthful…..

    ..which means you’ve just disrespected the schools in the caribbean where many medical doctors get THEIR education.

    once a doctor and a vet pass their boards, guess what they are called? Doctor. And it matters not where they went to school. that is an elitist statement and totally untrue.

    number 6. i know plenty of obese people and their dogs are not obese. if they are obese, it is more due to what they are fed. i agree there are too many people who do not exercise their dogs. i also agree there are too many dogs who are fed inappropriate food.

    since vets and doctors take a nutrition course that is paid for either by a pharmaceutical company or a pet food company, advising people to NOT give their dogs species appropriate supplements is not only in accurate, it’s dangerous. (#24). What vets do not know about nutrition or kibble can be put into the Library of Congress. They should never be permitted to speak about nutrition. and you have done your readers a disservice by printing this garbage, which people will follow blindly.

    Number 25 is so wrong, i hardly know where to start. there is a growing number of people in this country and in europe and asia who feed a species appropriate diet. this is not a public health hazard. there are more cases of salmonella each year from open bags of kibble which children handle than there are cases of any salmonella found in humans, related to raw feeding. children handle all kinds of objects, not the least of which is a dog’s anus or a dog’s poo. the leading cause of salmonella from pets are from kibble, not raw food.
    please have dr. amber andersen post how she came by this absolute lie.

    number 31. since vaccinations are over given, i think that places who only give half doses are actually doing their clients a favour. if the vet in california, who won’t give his/her name had the courage to research this, then he/she would find out that vaccinosis is a huge problem because of over vaccinating.

    38. yes, home cooking is something that needs to be researched. but a year of just chicken and vegetables made a jaw break? i find that very hard to believe. Perhaps if Monica Revel looked further than the diet, she’d have seen something that perhaps was more than just diet.

    number 39. this vet is saying that i should judge the competency and up to date knowledge of my vet by how he euthanises? seriously?

    number 41. certainly this is true. lmost vets should know that what they sell is very high priced, such as royal canin and science diet and has the worst ingredients and is not at all species appropriate. i have yet to meet a vet who agrees with that. so perhaps this vet in california should look at the junk food he or she is selling before bashing other foods.

    48. if dr. dennis leon studied raw nutrition, no one would have to brush their dogs’ teeth.

    this is a terrible article and very inaccurate.

    1. If you were not retired and practicing in my area, I would seek your practice and consider myself lucky to be your client. Thank you very much for your wonderful comment on this thread. 

  104. Good Article, its too bad that #25 and #38 are completely BULLSHIT.   Unverified claims, poor research.  How many dogs have died from ingesting socks, underwear, toys, sticks and other foreign material?  How many dogs have died from tainted KIBBLE involved in RECALLS? This topic COMPLETELY ignores the truth that HUNDREDS of dogs have been saved by being fed CARNIVORE appropriate diets.  How about the Diamond food salmonella issue going on as we speak? Thats no problem *insert sarcasm text*.  Humans handle raw meat for dinner every day! How is a dog eating raw (or cooked) meat any different? How many germ riddled door knobs, carts, car door handles, daily objects do we touch EVERYDAY and then handle children? GERMS are everywhere! Salmonella is not automatically in every single piece of meat that is fed to dogs.  GOOD JOB totally ignoring all the other REAL hazards that dogs and humans are confronted by on a daily basis.  I am a raw feeder and in contact with thousands of people across the world that feed raw meat.  I don’t know ANYONE that has contracted salmonella from feeding raw meat. 

    #38 is also a great example of poor journalism.  A healthy dog is not going to “break its jaw” from being fed cooked chicken breast for a year.  Is that the ideal diet? Absolutely not! A well rounded cooked (or raw) diet will never result in such a tragedy. With PROPER RESEARCH (something RD knows little about apparently), a well balanced home made diet is EASY. 

    Very dissapointed in your article.  I did enjoy your publication but will never pick up another one of these ever again.  Thanks for wasting trees with your garbage. 

    Emily

    1. A dog fed ONLY chicken breasts for a year, particularly a young dog, very easily could develop metabolic bone disease resulting in weak, fibrous bones which then break.  Research on home cooked diets should include the proper Calcium to phosphorus ratios that are required to maintain and grow bone.  An all chicken breast diet (without other supplements), can and will cause this problem.

  105. #11–If your vet does not provide painkillers as a minimum standard of care, then you need a new vet.  This is archaic and no, “a lot” of vets do not do this…just the backwater, no continuing education attending vets this guy has worked for I guess.  They do exist, but please don’t portray this as a common occurrence…providing pain control is a widespread industry standard.  

    #27–Um, yes, even indoor cats need to be regularly vaccinated.  Maybe not as often as ones that go outside, but immunity is not lifelong. Rabies vaccination is the law and is in place to protect human health.  You can carry other infectious diseases into your home on your shoes, and it is possible for your cat to slip out the door by accident.  The risk of contracting a deadly infectious disease far outweighs the incidence of vaccine-induced sarcomas.  

    The rest is mostly true, but I will stand up for the majority of my colleagues who graduated from Caribbean schools…there are good and bad vets who have graduated from every school and the majority of Caribbean graduates I have had the pleasure of working with are fine veterinarians.

    ER VET
    DVM, OK State 2002

  106. I think it’s really sad to see the scare tactics vets use against raw diets. Vets and dog food companies have convinced society that dogs can’t eat anything but processed junk. How did that happen? Everything has a natural food source and kibble is not natural. Everything has something from nature that it’s body should be ingesting. If it has to be processed then it shouldn’t be eaten.

    1. And the reason that dogs’ life spans have tripled is partly due to the commercialized kibble that you dislike so much.  I would ask you if you also eschew all processed foods or not.  

      1. I have. Not only processed foods, but GMOs too.

        My dogs eat free range and organic too. And I cross my fingers they will have the very long life spans enjoyed by the other raw eating dogs we know and have known. 

        Is there a study that you can share regarding the life span, that takes into consideration better drugs and veterinary care in modern times – and also considers the very poor food fed to many dogs before kibble (scraps and corn-gruel on farms, certainly not a raw food diet).  And animals in the wild have way too many variables and lack of vet care to consider that a fair comparison of longevity – perhaps captive animals may get us closer. And although you are saying “partly” (I know the others are things like vet care, drugs, and diagnostics), I think it may be only because of how dogs were treated in families in earlier days. Society and attitudes and availability making those lives longer, not kibble.

        So if kibble is indeed a factor of tripling the life span as you suggest, I would prefer to turn to science for the proof. Exactly what part of the piece of kibble that I’m not providing in my unprocessed diet is making that life longer? Or is it more to do with society moving away from table scraps and gruel to kibble, which is certainly a step up.

        Because there are many records available showing very long-living dogs from the 18 and early 1900s who never ate kibble, and ate a diet much closer to raw back then. But these dogs weren’t the norm. I’d love my dog to triple their life span (which was nearly 30 years long!)

        I think as part of this conversation we need to compare apples to apples  – either a large enough cross section of dogs, or perhaps compare raw vs kibble fed littermates so similar genetics and lifestyles can be analyzed. I’m not sure I’ve seen a fair, unbiased and consistent scientific study, but I would love to read it if available – the “lay person” that I am.

  107. I enjoyed some of these articles. However, I have t throw out there…
    People don’t realize that their vets barely know more about nutrition than we do as John Q public! They take a one hour course in college that teaches them Hills or Purina is the way to go. Well…They aren’t.
    Also! Home cooking??? NOT hard! lol Whichever vet said that is just ignorant.
    A raw diet? Dangerous??? I have a baby, who was a newborn when I started…all it takes is some minor precautions to avoid any issues. So far no problems here!

    1.  Interesting statement….let’s see, 3hrs/week X 16 weeks=48 hours in the first year
      4hrs/day for one week =20 hours in the third year
      4hrs/day for two weeks=40 hours in the fourth year

      That looks a lot more like a 108 hours of nutrition education to me!

      Good vets do evidence-based medicine.  When there are good, blind, peer reviewed studies that raw diets work I will try them.

      The truth is (and people hate this) is that the vast majority of board certified veterinary nutritionists recommend processed, balanced diets.

    2. We know more about nutrition than the average Joe or Dr. Google.  We took an entire SEMESTER on nutrition, not just one hour.  It also wasn’t sponsored by anyone.  A raw diet IS dangerous when not done correctly.  

      1. Any diet – for adult humans, children, dogs, or cats –  is dangerous when not done correctly. As is preparing a dinner for your family and not washing your hands after handling the raw chicken. Or cleaning the litter box. Or touching surfaces out in public then putting that hand in your mouth.  

        I would rather see vets work with – not against – their clients to make sure that diet is done correctly, instead of write it off altogether, and not honor that their research may have come from scientific studies – and other vets – that show raw feeding is safe when done correctly. We don’t just rely on “Dr. Google.”  We are a bit smarter than that. And if not, suggest a pre-prepared raw diet if you don’t think the client is capable of figuring it out. 

  108. All I have to say to Michelle Crouch is please try the following and then make your statement-

    -Live in a developing nation with bars on your windows so you dont get robbed.   
    – Go through electrcity allocated to you for 5 weeks in intervals from the hours of 8pm- 12am in 98 degree weather. 
          -Which means you can’t have refrigerated food sweetheart
          -Water requires power to be pumped through the well
          -Hot/Warm water requires electricity 
          -No Laundry
          -No TV, internet or phone
          -Study for your finals by candle light 
    -No walmart or supermarket with the vast array of choices. No malls, targets or kohls
    -Milk gets delievered on Thursday if you don’t purchase it or use it by Saturday you are out of luck. -Being away from friends and family for 28 months. 
    -Endure hurricane season and lose power and get flooded
    -Try not getting robbed, raped or murdered by the locals. 

    While doing all the above, take 25-30 credit hours of classes/ semester. 

    I went to clinics in the states and some of my classmates got into vet schoold because their parents “donated” so much money they magically got in.  I had another classmate who did “so well” in undergrad she skipped the interview and most of the admissions part and she almost killed several patients because she was so aloof and had no common sense.  But wait they got into vet school in the states so they must be better than myself a RUSVM alum. How about my collegues who went to vet school in state but it took them over seven years of trying because they kept getting rejected. You dont get to apply to schools for free btw. It costs at least 50-150 to apply to each school. The admissions is only open in the fall vs. Ross/Caribbean schools which has open admission all year long. Which is why I decided on Ross, I didn’t feel like waiting months after graduating undergrad with a 3.5 in animal science, and multiple leadership awards and experience. I appied to Ross only and got in and I went. 

    So before you bash us for working our butts off to pursue a dream that most of us had when we barely could walk,  educate yourself before making outlandish remarks that you have no idea about.  Maybe you went to a generic university and majored in communications or journalism. Perhaps you could write an article about that. Something you have some education on. Perhaps you could interview some “anonymous” writers that bash your education and see how you feel about it. 

    There are over 1000 Ross grads practicing GREAT medicine. In fact I bet you’ve met one of us and did not even realize it. We are the ones who love our job every day, who stay late so your pet can be seen. Who fought a VERY long and HARD battle that allowed us to achieve our life’s goal. Rather than putting us down you should use us as role models. 

    1. From a proud, almost alumnus (September, 2013 class) of RUSVM, I could not agree with you more. This was fantastically written. Thank-you.

  109. 27. “After their kitten vaccinations, indoor cats don’t really need to be vaccinated. They’re not going to get rabies sitting inside the house. Vaccines have the potential to create a lot of harm for cats, including possible tumors at the vaccine site.”—Jill Elliot, DVM, owner of Holistic Vet in New York and New Jersey.
    Ah, a holistic vet making comments about western medicine…how unusual.  I see on her website where she claims to cure cancer via holistic medicine.  I would love to see her data. If this holistic medicine actually worked, why did the lifespan of a typical Chinese person double to 71 from a low of 36 fifty years ago?  Could it be the introduction of western medicine?  Could the short life span from 50 years ago be from holistic medicine NOT working? Is holistic medicine a bunch of malarkey? 

  110. I have a problem with #27.  Although most indoor cats may not need every vaccination every year, rabies vaccinations are still required by law in all 50 states.  Some states require a yearly rabies vaccines and some accept an every 3 year vaccine.  If your cat isn’t up to date on its rabies vaccination and happens to come into contact with a wild animal or happens to bite someone the state might require it be euthanized to be sure it doesn’t have rabies and the person who is bit might have to go through a series of painful rabies vaccinations.  
    You don’t want to mess with rabies

    1. My cat is dead from her rabies vaccination.  Rabies vaccinations are showing a 7 year + immunidity. There is no reason to revaccinate when there is already immunidty becuase the immunidty in the body will attack the new vaccine and limit it useless, however the toxin and poisen is still int eh body.

    2. My cat is dead from her rabies vaccination.  Rabies vaccinations are showing a 7 year + immunidity. There is no reason to revaccinate when there is already immunidty becuase the immunidty in the body will attack the new vaccine and limit it useless, however the toxin and poisen is still int eh body.

  111. The vaccine comment is completely wrong as we’ve had to quarantine and euthanize cats that played with bats that ended up rabies positive. And of course the comment about Caribbean schools is absurd. Many students that go there don’t even apply to a US school because they don’t have one in state anyway or they were impressed by an alumni they worked with or wanted the extra hands on experience and one on one teaching you get at those schools compared to many american schools. Also the no kill shelter comment is worrisome. I worked at a no kill shelter that worked hard and truly was no kill besides legitimate medical reasons you would apply to a pet otherwise. I’ve had clients that read this and commented about it. It disturbs me to know a random comment from a pessimistic vet or one with a skewed opinion on something could make my clients feel that’s what I believe.

  112. Anything by Jessica Stout-Harris is way off, it seems as though she is just trying to stir the pot.  

  113. Shame on you RD. Number 20 is slander and false!! I will never subscribe to you again.

  114. To the idiot vet in california, I have a great friend who graduated from Ross University. Competition for getting into Vet school is hard even if you have great numbers because there are much less schools. She had to bust her butt off there without half the emotional support systems and pampering US schools give their students, she then had to bust her butt 2 years in UF’s vet school for the 2nd half of vet school. she then had to pay buttloads to take a licensing exam that you didn’t have to and it wasn’t easy by any standards from what I remember her telling me.  Maybe next time you should think before you give a public magazine such stupid statements. You are truly a disgrace to your colleagues and your profession for saying such things. Also how is a Ross graduate or SGU graduate different than an IMG coming here from say Romania or India etc. and then doing what they have to be licensed to practice in the states?? May karma get the best of you.

  115. How dare you diss the Caribbean schools (obviously SOMEONE was not accepted there) That statement is just  bias and false the statement found in #20. RUSVM is accredited (in fact, they were the first Caribbean vet school granted AVMA accreditation)  these kids work their butts off and are made to because of the bad rep they get, trust me every vet school worries about Ross because of its HIGH education and passes

  116. I fully agree.  I attend SGU in Grenada and I feel that I am getting a better education than if I had applied to the states.  We are fully AVMA accredited and in the end we all take the same boards to get our license, whether you went to a state school or not.  Here at SGU we get hands on experience that most state schools don’t get until their 4th year.  I am more than proud to say I went to SGU. 

  117. Regarding the raw food diet… It’s actually the best you can give your pet. It’s the closest to what they would eat in the wild. So many commercial foods are loaded with cheap fillers like corn, wheat, and soy. These are common allergies in dogs and cats. They need a grain free diet at the very least and mostly meat that is actually identified in the ingredients! Avoid by-products. That’s just left over junk unfit for human consumption. Not much quality protein there! So many health problems in pets these days due to improper diets.. I will never understand why so many pet foods list corn as the main, first ingredients.. Cats eating corn as a main diet? Absurd! Read the labels!

    As for the pet eating raw meat, then licking the baby.. Don’t pets also lick their behinds? I think that’s a lot worse… 

    1. I’m not sure what makes you qualified to determine the best diet you can give a pet–are you a veterinarian, a biologist, animal nutritionist?  If you have actual qualifications to make that determination, you should probably mention them in your post.  I’m going to go out on a limb and say you are likely not qualified, since no professional in veterinary medicine or nutritionist I have ever met has agreed with you.  It sounds like you are just a pet owner with a cat that was almost sick. For starters, dogs are domestic animals–not wild ones.  They evolved as a species living off the (cooked) scraps of human food.  Dogs “in the wild” don’t live very long, and that is in large part due to their inadequate diet.  They are not meant to live in the wild and eat a wolves diet.  They are omnivores who eat meat and vegetables, and yes–even some grains.  Cats require a higher protien diet and yes, some foods are too processed and high in grains for them, but better foods are coming out all the time.  Pet food companies spend billions of dollars and intesive time studying the nutritional needs of pets to produce a food that is safe and healthy.  Some foods are better than others, just like in humans and you should work with your veterinarian to find a quality commercial pet food that will ensure that your pet is getting the correct balance of nutrients.  There are NO proven benefits to feeding a raw diet, and many proven health hazards.

      1. My vet recommends raw. He feeds his own dogs raw.
        My dog’s have been tested.
        My female boxer has an auto immune disease. Her gums grow over her teeth and bleed. She also has about 20 tumors in her mouth. Over the years she has had 28 tumors removed, 6 teeth pulled because of her gums and the vet I had said it was necessary, and her gums cut back three times. She hasn’t had any more oral care that she would have to be put under for because she had a bad reaction to the sedative. I’ve been feeding her a Prey model RAW diet of meat bones and organs from my own research as well as my vet’s guidance and help from fellow raw feeders for one month. Her “tumors” as the last vet I had called them, are now almost nonexistent and her gums are 3/4 the way back to where they should be. That’s enough proof for me. Not to mention since starting raw she has been able to walk/run and enjoy her life. She doesn’t have to get supplements or prescriptions from the vet for her arthritis.

        How are dogs omnivores? Because their sharp pointed teeth are GREAT for grinding grains and plan matter. And their short digestive tract helps with the time it takes to digest it. Come on. Its basic biology. Dogs ARE Carnivores.

        You sound just like the narrow minded vet who begged and pleaded with me to not feed raw and swore that Purina dog chow was all my dogs would ever need. Get a life. I don’t trust vets. I honestly believe they are out to make the money. Raw diets have been keeping me out of the vet’s office, and thats what my vet wants to see. A HEALTHY dog. Not one who has to come back every month for shots and blood work so that the vet can make more money.

        1. Anecdote does not equal data.  And arthritis is a chronic progressive condition…it doesn’t go away without a joint replacement.  Obviously you slept through basic biology…dogs are omnivores.  Your dog sounds like a genetic nightmare…please don’t breed her…but I’m glad that she is better in spite of you.

          I wish I made as much money providing the best care possible as everybody thinks I do….get a clue, most vets are not rich…if we wanted to be rich, we would work on icky humans.

          ER VET
          DVM, OK State 2002

          1. Scientifly dogs are classified as Carnivores. They are not strict carviores like cats and can eat other material to survive.

          2. Scientifly dogs are classified as Carnivores. They are not strict carviores like cats and can eat other material to survive.

        2. You’re an idiot if you truly believe that veterinary professionals want to see your pet suffering.  That we intentionally keep them unhealthy to make the “loads” of money that people believe we make.  Veterinary staff tend to have a higher diversity of training than the human medical side and we make 1/2 of what they do if we’re lucky.  Why is it you say you don’t trust vets but you trust the only one you could find that follows your line of thinking that raw is best?  Would you eat raw chicken?  I’ve got no problem with someone who have been trained in the nutritional needs of a pet to make a home cooked diet for them, but the bacteria in un/undercooked meats are just as dangerous to them as it is to us.  You sound like the narrow minded client who shops around to find someone to agree with them rather than to listen to the knowledge of educated professionals.

        3. Familial gingival hyperplasia has been a known disease entity in boxers since the 50s.  Boxers are prone to both hyperplasia as well as the formation of multiple epulides (gingival tumors, usually fibrous, but sometimes invasive).  I suspect the issue will return in the future despite the diet.

      2. My vet was the one who recommended I put my dogs on a raw & home-cooked diet. She has even written a pet food cookbook to help people give their pets balanced meals. My dogs are very healthy, have clean, white teeth, and one is about to turn 14. And for the past 2 years I haven’t had to worry about pet food recalls. 

        1. I see healthy dogs with white teeth who are over 14 everyday, most of whom are on commercial dog food.  Just because your dog has been fine on a raw food diet doesn’t make it good.  You may not have had to worry about pet food recalls, but you SHOULD be worried about  salmonella, E.coli, Campylobacter and many other food borne illnesses your pet can get from eating a raw diet.  They are more likely to get sick from a raw diet then a commercial one, you just hear more about problems with commercial diets because there is accountability if a pet gets sick off of one.  I have no problem with a pet eating a home cooked diet if they diet is forrmulated in conjunction with a professional veterinary nutritionist, but raw and home cooked are completely different ball games.

    2. Dogs and cats in the wild also have an average 3 year lifespan…think it may have something to do with the diet???  I second what Dr. Smith wrote below me…you do not seem to have any qualifications allowing you to judge what is an appropriate diet for pets…so please do not spread misinformation among people.

    3. You don’t understand the public health risks at all. Just because your one old cat did well on a raw diet does not mean it is recommended for all pets. Most animals on a raw diet have nutritional deficiencys (vitamins and minerals). Animals are allergic to proteins not grains. 

    4. Agree, raw fed pets here from 2000. I still see the vet yearly for heart, eyes ect. check and exam and blood work. Good vets are not closed minded vets and look at the healthy animals to see why they are so healthy. Good vets do not scare their clients away that have done research and are willing to go to raw food to keep their pets healthy. Diet is the mortor of health, in humans and in pets. And good vets are willing to learn from their clients as well.

    5. Agree, raw fed pets here from 2000. I still see the vet yearly for heart, eyes ect. check and exam and blood work. Good vets are not closed minded vets and look at the healthy animals to see why they are so healthy. Good vets do not scare their clients away that have done research and are willing to go to raw food to keep their pets healthy. Diet is the mortor of health, in humans and in pets. And good vets are willing to learn from their clients as well.

    6. Even if dogs did live ” in the wild” ( which they haven’t done for 10,000 or so years) they would eat freshly killed prey, not mass- murdered, bacterial- slathered factory farmed killed meat which was fed antibiotics and has multiple drug resistan e coli and salmonella all over it from the chaos that is a modern slaughterhouse. I too have seen many pets sickened and nearly die from raw diets. They are dangerous, period. I don’t make any more money as a vet if you buy alpo, purina, $50 a bag Evo or feed raw ground beef from the dairy. Why am I passionately against raw diet?
      I care about your pet, and I care that your three year old doesn’t die of salmonella shed in your dogs feces because your breeder or google told you to feed it raw diet.

    7. I am a certified animal nutritionist and I do agree that, for some pets, raw diets are much better than the commercial diets. However, if the owner is not doing proper research, a raw diet can potentially kill the pet. I once met a Great Dane puppy that had been fed a raw diet. She didn’t get the nutrition she needed, and broke her pelvis simply by jumping off the couch. The problem is, most owners don’t do their research.

      Also, just because corn is listed as the first ingredient, it is not the main ingredient. That is (mostly) true for human nutrition, but not for animals. It is the main ingredient before processing (cooking and things like that), but most of the time, most of the corn and fillers are processed out of the food.

  118. I am appalled along with all the rest of the SGU/Ross grads (or in my case, spouse to a SGU student), by #20 and have already canceled my subscription and written a letter to the editors. I’m sure it will be overlooked, but hope more people do the same. So good luck to the others as you “buy” your DVM degree…

  119. Re item 20  An ill informed and ignorant statement that is insulting to the many DVM that are fully qualified to American standards and who have spent years working diligently to follow the same course and standards at St. Georges University. Grenada. My close friend is a student   at  St. Georges and about to commence her final clinical year at University of Florida. Does this mean UF  are complicit in turning out degree mill veterinary doctors?  An immediate retraction  and appology by the anonymous author of this claptrap is called for.

  120. Many of these points are misleading and untrue. As many of my colleagues have stated, #20 is libelous. I am proud to have graduated from Ross, even pre-accreditation. Many of my colleagues my clinical year could not have passed the ECFVG, an extremely rigorous 3-day clinical exam; and they stated that themselves.

    While some of us may feed our pets chocolate (I sure don’t…) that doesn’t mean that you should- we know the signs of toxicity and know how much a pet can tolerate…but that doesn’t make it ok.

    Many vets are paid on production…not just VCA or Banfield.

    Yes, we can sometimes write you a prescription. But I would rather give your pet an injection of antibiotics that may cost more but lasts 2 weeks and ensures that your pet gets the full course of treatment…missing “one or two” doses can be harmful to your pet and can make that $4 antibiotic useless in a super infection.

    RD- please check your facts before publishing.

  121. Many of these points are misleading and untrue. As many of my colleagues have stated, #20 is libelous. I am proud to have graduated from Ross, even pre-accreditation. Many of my colleagues my clinical year could not have passed the ECFVG, an extremely rigorous 3-day clinical exam; and they stated that themselves.

    While some of us may feed our pets chocolate (I sure don’t…) that doesn’t mean that you should- we know the signs of toxicity and know how much a pet can tolerate…but that doesn’t make it ok.

    Many vets are paid on production…not just VCA or Banfield.

    Yes, we can sometimes write you a prescription. But I would rather give your pet an injection of antibiotics that may cost more but lasts 2 weeks and ensures that your pet gets the full course of treatment…missing “one or two” doses can be harmful to your pet and can make that $4 antibiotic useless in a super infection.

    RD- please check your facts before publishing.

  122. # 20 is a disgusting lie- it would be nice if you did research prior to making such ridiculous, baseless statements

  123. I find #20 to be very offensive and untrue. I graduated undergrad with honors and a medal in biology, and I am an SGU student. I also achieved above average results on the GRE. SGU is AVMA accredited, and is an excellent school. The students here work equally as hard as those at veterinary schools in the US. We have to pass the same licensing exam, and additionally must cope with the hardships of living in a second world country (an experience which I feel makes us more understanding, well-rounded individuals). I think it shows an amazing amount of passion to leave our comfortable lives and families in the US and travel to a foreign country to fulfill our dreams of becoming veterinarians.

  124. Several points on this list are despicable. Was there no editor or fact checker? Michelle Crouch, if Hitler told you it is ok to kill masses of people would you publish it as fact? This is terrible journalism and you can be sure no more veterinarians will be reading your magazine.

  125. Some vets didn’t get into an American school, some vets did. But Caribbean schools like Ross and St. George’s are accredited by the AVMA (the same AVMA that accredits Penn, Ohio State or any of the US schools) so the standards of education aren’t lower. They might be easier to get into, but they’re just as tough to get out of!

  126. I, personally, am appalled that #20 would even be printed.  I’m a proud graduate of an Ivy League university and I’m currently a vet student in the Caribbean.  I CHOSE to go to a Caribbean vet school (in fact, I didn’t even apply to any state schools) because they offer a more hands-on curriculum.  Ross and SGU have even been accredited by the AVMA, which means that their curriculum is on par with or exceeds the curriculum of any accredited U.S. vet school.  In fact, SGU had a 96% pass rate on the NAVLE (the national licensing exam) for 2010-2011, which is better than many of the U.S. schools. In addition, alumni of Caribbean schools have proven their ability to adapt to new environments and cultures.  To imply that we are any less veterinarians, or that we “didn’t get into vet school” is not only insulting, it’s just plain ignorant.  

  127. I’m not sure who did the research on this article but you might want to go back and do it again. My daughter worked her tail off to get good grades both prior to and while at SGU which happens to turn out incredible Vets. Many of the prior students have also gone on to receive national and world wide recognition in their areas of expertise with their string foundation and roots obtained at SGU!! I’d like Reader’s Digest to rethink this article and put out a retraction…# 20 is pure garbage!

    PROUD Mom of an SGU student!!

  128. 1.SGU and ROSS University’s are AVMA Accredited university’s. Which means the school I am attending busted its butt to have a program that met or exceeded the same standards that any AVMA accredited school had to meet. 

    2. We complete our clinical year right along side our US counterparts. We have specific criteria we have to meet to be eligible to attend those fourth years schools (those standards are set by the individual US school). Not only do I complete requirements SGU sets for clinics I complete the requirements of the 4th year school I attend. So at the point of clinical rotations I have met the standards of not one but two universities that can award a DVM degree

    3. We  ALL (US and Caribbean schools) have to sit the NAVLE – which is the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam. You can’t practice state side without passing it. Check out the first time pass rates for the Caribbean schools and US schools. We do every well. Unless you are willing to believe that part of “buying our degree” includes buying our why out of a the NAVLE too. 

    4. Unless you have seen it with your own eyes, or experienced with your own life. Do not invent it with your small mind and speak it from a big mouth 

  129. what a Joke! #20 is absolutely false. How dare that “some Vet from California” say that and that you would publish it without looking into the fact. Ignorant to the max.

  130. what a Joke! #20 is absolutely false. How dare that “some Vet from California” say that and that you would publish it without looking into the fact. Ignorant to the max.

  131. what a Joke! #20 is absolutely false. How dare that “some Vet from California” say that and that you would publish it without looking into the fact. Ignorant to the max.

  132. While most are true, I’ve never heard of vets giving half doses of vaccines.  Honestly, though, they probably are still effective!  The intranasal bordetella vax only needs a few drops out of 1 ml to be effective.  And like most places, if you are rude to the staff we won’t take it out on your animal, but we WILL take it out on your wallet!  And a tip for clients:  ASK!  GET 2nd OPINIONS!  YOU can make decisions, too!  Just don’t always trust the internet for advice, or one doctor either.

    1. I went to a conference on this- half doses ARE NOT effective!! If they were, wouldn’t everyone ( vets) do this? It’s bad medicine, and off label use to give half doses of vaccines and can leave your pet susceptible to a deadly infection’

  133. Dear ” A vet in California”, I would just like say that I think your comment regarding the Caribbean schools is grossly misleading. Both Ross and SGU are FULLY AVMA accredited, unlike some of the schools in the United States. I cannot speak for Ross here, but I know that SGU students have a very high NAVLE pass rate, as well as an incredible track record sitting the MRCVS exam (of the 8 SGU to last sit this exam, there was a 100% pass rate). There are many Board Certified specialists on the faculty, some of whom have been involved in pioneering new veterinary procedures. We also have the honour of having Dr Chris Pasquini as one of our faculty members, and not only are his textbooks recommend for studying the NAVLE, they are also used in numerous schools across America (and at SGU). It is a shame that there are people in our profession that are still as small minded as this; if the standard of education that Caribbean students are receiving was below standard, the AVMA would not have accredited us. SGU has also produced it’s own board certified specialists, as I’m sure has Ross, so it is obvious our educational background stands us in good stead for the internship/externship matching program. 
    And also to the editor of this article/Reader’s Digest itself; what did you think would happen when you decided to publish this comment which, if you ask me, almost constitues slander! I think that this was very short sighted; you must have expected that this article would be read by Caribbean Veterinary Students- did you think we were just going to sit down and quietly accept it? I am VERY glad to see that the AVMA has taken a stance on this, and issued a statement regarding it!

  134. Like many others I would like to point out that some schools in the Caribbean are accredited by the  same AVMA that grants accreditation to US schools. Also, we take the same board exams to practice in the US. It’s more a matter of experience than where you get your education.

    I in fact chose to go to SGU, not because I couldn’t get in in the US, but because I talked to several practicing vets who went to schools all over the US, and most said that the day they graduated they were expected to perform surgeries alone, although had never actually gotten to do one while in school. No one from SGU said that, all the Vets from there said they felt very prepared and had lots of hands on experience. 

    Don’t judge a vet by a school. If the vet is taking wonderful care of your pet… he/she is a good vet. If not, try a new vet…. regardless of where he/she received his/her education. 

  135. Worst magazine ever! Will never pick this magazine up after comment # 20

  136. #20: I know people who were accepted into state schools with a C average and people who weren’t accepted who had a 4.0. I also know people in state veterinary schools who have a C average (maybe they had an A in college, who knows) and I know students at an AVMA ACCREDITED veterinary school in the Caribbean who have all As.  Who would you rather have treat your pet: someone who had a C in college and an A at an AVMA accredited veterinary school in the Caribbean, or someone who had an A in college and a C at an AVMA accredited school in the USA? Anyways, you learn the same material and which school the vet attended does not determine how well they know that information.  Go to a vet based on recommendations or how well they treat you pet.  Not based on the school they went to, b/c if you’re judging your decision on this you should also ask them for their college AND veterinary grades/transcripts. 

    1. I agree that #20 is way off base. I do have to say though, as someone who got into vet school with a low undergrad GPA, I don’t think your undergrad grades will matter much as a veterinarian. That English class I flunked as a college freshman probably isn’t going to have any major effect on my skills as a veterinarian.

  137. Yes, number 20 is way off. Most of the people I know had fantastic grades and test scores while applying to veterinary schools. The fact is that there are just not enough spots in the US and students don’t want to waste their life waiting around for the next application period. SGU and Ross are great schools with amazing faculty and are both accredited.- Don’t let #20 fool you. 

  138. Yes, number 20 is way off. Most of the people I know had fantastic grades and test scores while applying to veterinary schools. The fact is that there are just not enough spots in the US and students don’t want to waste their life waiting around for the next application period. SGU and Ross are great schools with amazing faculty and are both accredited.- Don’t let #20 fool you. 

  139. Yes, number 20 is way off. Most of the people I know had fantastic grades and test scores while applying to veterinary schools. The fact is that there are just not enough spots in the US and students don’t want to waste their life waiting around for the next application period. SGU and Ross are great schools with amazing faculty and are both accredited.- Don’t let #20 fool you. 

  140. #20 is incredibly misleading. Many students go to a Caribbean vet school as their first choice! Who wouldn’t want to spend 4 years on a beautiful island? And even if they were rejected from a US school it’s unlikely to be due to bad grades or poor test scores, there simply aren’t enough seats for qualified applicants. And you can be sure that people get admissions rejections from the Caribbean schools as well. Shame on you “vet in California.” Maybe you should have gone to school in the Caribbean then you wouldn’t be so narrow minded and would have an appreciation for different lifestyles!!!

  141. #20 is false. St. George’s University and Ross are fully accredited by the AVMA and are real vets. Fact check before you post something RD.

  142. I would also like to comment on #20. I believe this veterinarian should actually take the time to visit and learn about Caribbean schools before making a judgement. I am currently attending Ross University, located in St Kitts in the Caribbean, and chose to come here instead of a U.S. school because of the great reputation Ross grads have. The Ross students who enter their clinical (4th year) of veterinary school have a reputation of being more knowledgeable and experienced than students from U.S. vet schools. Ross would never have become accredited by the AVMA (who accredits all U.S. vet schools) if they didn’t meet certain educational criteria, which considers the education to be EQUIVALENT to the U.S. The students here are the most intelligent, hardworking people I have ever been around. Those that can’t cut it, fail out. I have seen that happen many times. I have heard (not sure if this is 100% true) that in U.S. schools, once you get in, it’s difficult to fail out – so you can get in, and then stop working as hard during vet school. Not the same here – if you stop working for a second, you fail out. Ross has very high educational standards – they are newly accredited, so they are taking every step to ensure the accreditation is maintained. They only want to graduate the students who will uphold the school’s reputation, and build a name for themselves that will continue to make other potential students want to come here.

  143. This is absolutely an egregious error for a publication with a reputation like Reader’s Digest to print something flagrantly FALSE such as you can buy education from all Caribbean veterinary schools. Ross University and St. George’s are AVMA accredied and thus THE EQUIVALENT OF A U.S. VETERINARY EDUCATION. Shame on you!! I have worked with ER vets from Ross who outshine Penn vets and save lives. This makes me wonder what other lies you will be printing and I am promptly going to torch my May issue of RD and cancel my membership. This libelous material is no longer allowed in my home until you print the truth. You’ve been 86’d RD!!!

    1.  As a current SGU student you’re darn sure my RD subscription is being canceled!!! I will be requesting a refund and even if a retraction/apology is printed I won’t be reading it again. Who knows what other libel is in there that no one noticed?!

  144. Clearly I was fired up…Hit post before getting a chance to spell-check!

  145. How dare you let this article go to press with #20 still present. If that vet really believed that they would have been proud to put their name on it. Complete slander and it’s insulting to those who are attending school that adhere to the SAME standards as U.S. school. Does AVMA accreditation ring a bell? 

    I don’t know where that vet “bought” her facts but they are owed a refund.

  146. It sounds like the writer of this article did not do his/her research when it comes to #20.  As a current Ross University student I find this to be a very alarming and misleading to your readers.  I am not attending Ross University b/c I am sub-par. In fact I was accepted into 3 U.S. schools, yet chose Ross University over the state schools. I have been blown away by the capability and intelligence of my classmates (who are also certainly not sub-par).  My animals’ veterinarian, whom I hand-picked to treat my pets, is a graduate of Ross University and is one of the best small animal vets I have met. 
    I strongly advise you to edit or remove this article all together.  It is very damaging to the veterinary profession and its clients.  There is no reason for a client to misjudge the ability of a doctor based on a biased remark in an uncited internet article.

  147. Good article for owners of cats & dogs. But as a hobby farm owner I’m lucky to even find a vet to see my animals. No one wants to treat farm animals any more. At least in upstate NY. 

  148. A number of these points are offensive and untrue. As a veterinarian who works for VCA, a corporate clinic, I’m incredibly dismayed to see Jessica-Stout Harris (whose relationship to veterinary medicine is not apparent), state that people may be charged more simply for coming to a corporate clinic. Many vets are paid in a similar fashion, and I for one would NEVER charge clients extra fees. I’m incredibly disappointed in both your research, contacts, and the seeming to need make veterinarians villains. What is absolutely true is that the vast majority of veterinarians I know and work with are devoted to being advocates for patients, educators for clients, work long hours, and constantly work to provide the best possible care for any animal that we see. This includes veterinarians who graduate from non-US schools. 

  149. I have worked alongside many great vets that have come from Caribbean schools, and am currently a student at Ross University myself.  Our education is no less challenging nor is our curriculum inferior to those at American schools.  As a matter of fact, our passing grade is a 70%, not a 60% like some American schools are!  We are held to just as high of a standard and don’t take our oath any more lightly than our American colleagues.  We have just as much hands-on experience, if not MORE than some schools.

    What Ross provides for us students is a great opportunity to live and grow both personally and professionally with a wide array of experiences that we never would have had if we had attended schools in the US.  I would never have had the experience to work alongside the St. Kitts Sea Turtle Monitoring Network to help preserve the breeding population of leatherback sea turtles had I gone to an American school, for example!If #20 were true, the AVMA would not have accredited the university.  Accreditation implies that our institution meets or even exceeds the same standards that all accredited US veterinary schools are also held to.  There are even some schools in America that have limited accreditation status.  What I’d like to know is how the author of #20 feels about foreign graduates that have passed the PAVE or ECFVG (in addition to the NAVLE and their state boards) to get full licensure in the US if they have relocated to the States.  

    I am proud to be a Ross vet student, and I am thankful for the opportunity that the school has provided me. I know many of us down here would agree! We’re a dedicated, passionate bunch of students who have a lot to bring to the field of veterinary medicine, and I feel as though our commitment to the veterinary oath shows with the sacrifices we made in our own lives to get to this point.

  150. I would have hoped that RD would have done their homework before publishing this list. Overall it was interesting and most likely helpful, however #20 is not only offensive, it is wrong. The Caribbean schools have been accredited which means that they stack up very well to the stateside schools. In fact, when those students return to the states for their clinical year at affiliate schools, they are welcomed with open arms and they continue to impress these affiliates. RD should be a reputable source and therefore should have never have printed such a quotation from a vet who obviously has not had the opportunity to visit one of these so called “buy your degree” schools. We are anything but. 

  151. I’d like to know the the name of the pompous ‘vet from California’ that came up with #20.  I have an opinion as well.  The vet from California needed people to hold his hand through vet school, and tutor him after hours through the material due to his undeveloped study habits and general lack of discipline.  In the Caribbean, that vet would have failed out.  The challenge would have thwarted his world view to the point he’d confine himself to his mommy’s basement.  What an ethnocentric, ignorant, and professionally sorry comment.  I never read Readers Digest, and without a published apology for printing this garbage I’ll avoid it forever.  F U

  152. My cousin worked VERY HARD and had great grades but the competition to get into Vet school is very difficult.  She DID NOT have bad grades, or bad test scores.  She is pursuing her dream in the Carribean at Vet school.  She has to work her butt off every semester, just as she did in the US.  #20 is crap, plain and simple.

  153. #20 is an ignorant, out dated opinion. Do some research before you publish such slanderous statements. Not the greatest journalism i’ve ever seen. 

  154. Almost all of the Caribbean veterinary schools are accredited. So yes I did get into a veterinary school. 

  155. I cannot believe that #20 was part of this list.  The statements made are completely false.  People are not attending these schools because of “bad grades and poor test scores” but because there are so few students accepted to veterinary programs in the US.  In many cases, vets who attended school outside of the US have much more experience and a better demeanor, and when they relocate back to the US to complete their clinical year with one of the many veterinary schools there, they are often preferred to stateside students to perform procedures because of those skills.  It takes a great amount of determination and passion to completely move to a foreign land to become a veterinarian (or other profession), and these dedicated students should most certainly not be chastised for it.

  156. It’s very unfortunate that #20 made the list. And it’s more unfortunate that this kind of attitude persists among veterinarians. I have many bright and committed colleagues who chose a Caribbean school over US schools because the best veterinarians they know are from Caribbean schools.
    Also, the post regarding Ketamine is highly misleading.  Ketamine is a great drug and an effective option as PART of an anesthesia protocol.

  157. I am so ashamed of the veterinarian who stated #20. Obviously, they need to spend some time with the graduates from Ross University or St. George’s.

    Double shame on the person who allowed that to be printed.

     

  158. #20- HA!! It’s true that some Caribbean school, specifically Ross University, admits more students than US schools and students that may not of had a 3.8-4.0 undergrad grades (they put more weight on experience than US schools). But I know from experience, the real challenge is STAYING in. The curriculum is so difficult that many people don’t make it past the 1st couple semesters. This prepares us well for our clinical year at a US vet school, where we are often praised for our knowledge, extreme work ethic, and determination.

  159.  Being a student from a Caribbean Veterinary school, I am very offended by #20.  Students from Ross University and St. George’s are regarded very highly in the field, and often excel beyond students from the states.  I chose Ross University as my first and only choice for a reason!

  160. Double thumbs down to you for your narrow-minded and prejudiced reporting. I am currently a student at RUSVM in the Caribbean and will tell you that reading your article (#20 makes the rest hardly worth the read due) is completely libelous and false. There is a reason that this California veterinarian made an anonymous statement: his or her colleagues from around the globe would be outraged for seeing this. 

    Our graduates are just as prepared, if not more so, than students from U.S. institutions (and yes, we have become AVMA accredited, in full, because WE EARNED IT). We have professors who are passionately dedicated to the future of this profession, who are both incredibly in love with what they do and have centuries worth of knowledge and experience to back it up scientifically and clinically, between them all. 

    I am a Southern California native and would love to know the identity of this brave individual who has so courageously decided to attack RUSVM and St. Matthew’s alumni . . . anonymously. The veterinary world is a very small community and I can say without regret that I would be more than happy to never work with people with such closed minds and such pessimistic, down-right inaccurate views.

    Next time you bring ‘Fluffy’ to the veterinarian, I hope you get a loving, compassionate, educated, diligent, persevering, responsible, altruistic, empathetic and, most importantly, REAL veterinarian who graduated from one of our fine Caribbean institutions. I am proud to be a member of the veterinary community; regardless of where we train, we are veterinarians.

     – – An RUSVM 6th semester veterinary student who most certainly did not purchase a veterinary education, but one who is earning it through incredibly hard, back-breaking work, day in and day out, to bring health and happiness to you and your pets life

  161. As a vet student at Ross University it blows my mind that people think we are simply paying for our degrees down here.  Why would we rack up 250,000 dollars in debt to earn a DVM, which pays a lot less money than say an MD, unless we were passionate about our love for animals and the profession? We work just as hard as students in state schools, and earn our degrees.  Would you rather have a vet from a state school with limited accreditation, as at least one school in the US has, or from an institution that has passed the AVMA’s inspection and just happens to be located outside of the United States? 

  162. As a vet student at Ross University it blows my mind that people think we are simply paying for our degrees down here.  Why would we rack up 250,000 dollars in debt to earn a DVM, which pays a lot less money than say an MD, unless we were passionate about our love for animals and the profession? We work just as hard as students in state schools, and earn our degrees.  Would you rather have a vet from a state school with limited accreditation, as at least one school in the US has, or from an institution that has passed the AVMA’s inspection and just happens to be located outside of the United States? 

    1. I was not able to read past number 20….. I could not believe that Readers Digest could publish such a false and ignorant statement baffles me. I am proud Ross grad that graduates from Bates College with a 3.7. There were multiple people in my class that had above 3.8 or even a 4.0 in under grad. I passed every licensing exam a US student passed and then some more. To state in a national magazine that I just “paid” my way to becoming a DVM leaves my mouth hanging…..in my class I personally know a hand full that have passed their boards for internal medicine, equine and small animal, emergency and critical medicine,cardiology and small animal surgery….all Ross grads. I am personally pursuing advanced training in Veterinary Dentistry and apply to the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry….god knows if I will accredited…I’m just a stupid Ross grad who couldn’t get into a “real vet school”,…, I really hope the dean at Ross or the owners see this article Readers Digest might have some legal problems.
      What if owners read this article and actually believe what is in it….especially if they hear that their DVM went to some carribean school and judge you on that….not let you treat their pets when you are more then capable of…..so upsetting!

  163. Great overall article, but #20 is a complete lie, shame on you Readers Digest!! As a technician I worked with may extremely talented and hard working veterinarians who happened to go to schools located in the Caribbean. I also worked with a great vet who went to school in Canada, what does that say about her degree? Now I’m a student at a Caribbean vet school. I underwent my 4 science -heavy years of undergrad, but happened to live in a state without a state vet school. This made getting into an out of state school extremely difficult without a GPA basically above a 3.8. The Caribbean schools are also highly competitive but don’t give priority to any one state or group of states. Also both Ross University and St. Georges University are now fully accredited by the AVMA, meaning the schools met the AVMA’s rigorous requirements and the students do not have to take foreign exams. There are vet schools located in the states that do not yet meet these AVMA requirements, I don’t see you mentioning those schools. Please do a little research before deeming any professional institution.    

  164. Yes, Caribbean veterinary schools take students that didn’t score a 3.8-4.0 GPA, but just because they get into vet school doesn’t mean they graduate. At Ross University we’re held to passing classes with a 70%, not 60% as in some American schools. And if you can’t pass a class, you don’t pass the semester. Fail 2 classes and you are dismissed from the school. We’re not stupid down here, we have to work hard to get through vet school just like everyone else.

  165. Re: #25 usual vet line about raw food. Think about it, if one vet has had two deaths and two sick dogs, that would translate to hundreds of deaths throughout the country and it WOULD be a public health issue and we would have heard about it. Compare that to the number of confirmed pet deaths  from contaminated commercial feeds.

    1. The problem is not only the risk to your dog or cat, but the risk to you.  There are plenty of documented cases where entire families have become sick from the raw diet the dog or cat is eating, compared with a commercially produced diet.  I’m not saying that some dogs or cats don’t do better on home cooked diets, because some do, but the risk of feeding raw to your pets is HUGE, not just from the point of bacteria.  There’s also malnutrition, perforated esophagus and intestines to think about as well if you’re feeding bones.  There have been no scientific studies that show that feeding home cooked OR raw diets benefits ALL pets, so the jury is still out on that.  

      1. Malnutrition and other issues aren’t a problem if research is done, meat handled correctly, etc. Raw bones don’t perforate. Not like cooked ones.

        1. Exactly. Perforation is a crazy myth. I wonder where coyotes and wolves would get their kibble from, were this true?  And if the risk is so huge, how can thousands upon thousands feed their pets raw without problems – something dogs have done for thousands of years prior to kibble manufacturing? And malnutrition is absolutely not at all true if you do even the smallest bit of research, consult a vet for a recipe (how I started), or if a person doesn’t want to there are commercial raw diets available.

          And I have learned to wash my hands after feeding my dogs, just as I do when I prepare myself chicken that starts in raw form. And clean the floors where they eat, just like I clean the floors of the kitchen and bathrooms that all require cleaning to avoid pathogens. Basic hygiene and common sense doesn’t only apply when feeding raw!

          1. dogs are not wolves and have experienced selective breeding for thousands of years. They don’t even have the same flora in their intestines! obviously you people don’t practice emergency medicine where we see the blowout bloody diarrhea cases due to raw diets.

    2. Actually, you wouldn’t hear about it because it wouldn’t be reported.  There is no one monitoring raw food diets like there are monitoring commericial diets.  The reason we know about contaminated commercial food is because the companies are held accountable for what they put out.  If an animal gets sick from their food, people complain and the companies are forced to do something about it.  If your dog dies from salmonella from a home prepared diet, there is no on to blame but yourself and so there is no accountability that forces it to become public knowledge.

      1. I stopped feeding commercial pet food in April of 2007 when an estimated 40,000 pets died from melamine in the pet food. I will never feed commercial pet food again.
        I have home cooked for my dogs and cat since then and they are all healthy and well nourished, including a dog I got as a puppy. I was warned by a vet and a vet tech that I was risking developmental disabilities by feeding a growing pup home cooked food. If you could see my now 2+ yr old sheltie race around the yard at breakneck speed, jumping over obstacles, it would be abundantly clear how healthy she is. I feed cooked meat with ground eggshell or powdered calcium carbonate added (1 1/2 teasp per 6 cups of food). That meets the dietary requirements of a carnivore. It isn’t rocket science.
        While I do not feed a raw diet, 3 generations of my indoor/outdoor cats have supplemented their diets with killed prey and none suffered any ill effects. All but one of my cats lived into their 20s and one made it to 23.

        1. then you haven’t seen the nutritional deficiencies and related diseases later in life due to people not putting in the proper nutritional requirements. For example, if cats are not fed Taurine in their diets they develop heart failure and blindness. Not to mention abnormal protein to carb ratios and lack of proper minerals.

    3. Ever think that it’s the “usual vet line” because it’s true? Why else would so many from a variety of schools and a variety of backgrounds come to the same conclusion? Also – note that there is an inverse financial relationship with that recommendation – we make less money of you follow the recommendation, because we don’t “get” to treat you animal for malnutrition, perforation, obstruction, salmonellosis, etc.

    4. well then you must not be listening to the news or doing any emergency work! Hello? E.coli? Salmonella? Ever heard of ’em?

  166. I work at a vet school and I have to say that most of the students who come here to complete their education have a better knowledge base, more clinical skills and are just all-around better prepared than the students who have been educated at this American school. I don’t think it’s just my school either.
    I also want to second what MindyB said. Rabid bats DO get inside. I believe a man died from rabies within the past few years because he was bitten by a rabid bat in his own house while he slept and didn’t realize it.
    Your $2000 designer dog is really just a mutt though. 

  167. I wanted to comment on point #18 (about no-kill shelters). I currently volunteer for one, and we absolutely refuse to send any pets to be put down. We have a full shelter because of this practice, which has its pros and cons, but even then, we try to find room for another pet to come join us. In fact, we’ve been accepting donations to help pay for our costs of moving to our larger shelter so we can take even more in. So it’s not a “secret” of no-kill shelters, or at least not for all of them.

    1. Well, there is one near me in another county that is *always* full and our city gets to deal with the animals that they won’t take in.  Frankly, that’s not fair or right.  

      1. There are about 80 open-admission shelters that are following the No Kill equation. It sounds like the city should take that on. A mix of private organizations and open admission is not a bad thing, unless the private organization is supposed to be helping the open admission shelter (some have agreements that they ignore in practice, such as in San Francisco). It is also, I believe, morally best to help local animals. If the private org is cherry picking highly adoptables from other areas, it certainly isn’t following the spirit of “no kill” and is doing a disservice to the community. 

    2. Agreed. The problem is that vet, and many others (including whoever allowed that to go to print) do not understand the definition of “No Kill” if you are using it in relation to the “No Kill Equation” where it came from. If a shelter or rescue hoards animals, or kills them in that manner, and so on – they are not “no kill”, or employing the life saving procedures that are part of the equation.

    3. I agree. The real miscommunication is: The Humane Society its NOT a no-kill shelter.

  168. #27, we have had a client whose indoor cat killed a bat in her infants room in their house only to test positive for rabies, thankfully THIS indoor cats owner followed our recommendation that her indoor only cat be vaccinated for rabies. I’ve been a tech for over 15 years and have seen plenty of “indoor only” cats who have come in for cat fight wounds when they are the only cat in the house??? 

    1.  #27, so true, no bats in here, but every year there’s an epidemic of panleukopenia among city cats, you can so easily bring it on your shoes, or by petting a stranger cat in the street. And my idiot cat, indoor only, always before afraid of the balcony, this year has attempted to escape and play with the neighbour’s dogs (the dogs are mortally frightened with her, and she apparently likes it). I’m so putting an anti-cat net once the spring comes.

  169. Interesting article. However, shame on you RD for allowing #20 to make it to print. It is a complete lie.

  170.  Yeah, it is so ethnocentric to think that adequate vets can only come from a US school.  I’ve met Canadian, UK, Australian grads that know so much more than some US grads, its shameful.  In fact, just as the rest of the world is ahead of us in education by the time we’re 18, some of the overseas schools are ahead of us on issues of animal welfare, behavior, physical therapy, etc.  The Carribean schools have had a bad rap because they weren’t AVMA accredited, but that has changed.  Many Canandian, UK, European, and Australian schools have been AVMA for a long time, and there is no reason to think of those vets as substandard.  In fact, I rather have one of them!

  171. IF YOUR VET DOES NOT WASH THEIR HANDS BEFORE HANDLING YOUR PET, TAKE YOUR PET AND RUN.  GOD KNOWS WAS GERMS AND INFECTION YOUR PET CAN CATCH.  HAD A TOY POODLE THAT ALMOST DIED AFTER A VISIT TO MY EX SLOB.  I ALSO DENIED PAYMENT TO THE CREDIT CARD COMPANY.

    1. You’re the client that vets dread walking in the door. We in the vet field wash our hands all the time out of necessity for our health as well as your pet’s – and even if your vet didn’t, think about what dogs do all day: eat and roll in anything that smells bad, ie dead stuff and garbage, lick themselves, eat anything off the floor… and then you let them lick your face, give you kisses and you may not wash your hands after touching them (I sure don’t, it’s MY dog).

      And how would you feel if you did a ton of work and then were told “Nope, you don’t get paid”? I hope it happens to you.

    2. Are you insane? Please don’t ever own an animal so that no vet has to deal with you.

    3. Because that was *totally* due to the vet *supposedly* not washing his hands, not any negligent treatment or denial of diagnostics and treatment on your part, right?  That’s what I thought.

  172. Thoroughly enjoyed this, very true! Although I will say, I went to a school in the Caribbean. It wasn’t because I was rejected from a stateside school, never even applied to one. However, I gained so much knowledge and life experience that I would never have here in the US.
    Several of my teachers wrote the books that others learn from so I certainly didn’t receive a lesser education:)

    1. Hmmm…I have a BA from a UC school, an MBA from a top 10 Business school and did my post-bacc work at an Ivy League school. I have a 3.98 GPA and scored 1450 on the GRE. And I’m starting vet school at Ross Univ in about two weeks. Didn’t even bother applying to the US schools either. #20 is way off.

      1. It may be bias, but go to SGU! I love it, plus they’re accredited! I know multiple people who transferred to SGU from Ross and are much happier with the education they’re receiving. Congrats on entering vet school! It’s a long hard road for everyone, and I firmly agree that Caribbean schools are just as great as US and other international vet schools. Welcome to the fam, cohort!

        1. That statement is just as bias and false as the statement found in #20. RUSVM is accredited as well (in fact, we were the first Caribbean vet school granted AVMA accreditation) and offers no less of an education than does St. George’s. Both institutions offer veterinary training tantamount to any other AVMA accredited school.

          1. I agree- number 20 is way off, I think Caribbean vet schools even give a superior education compared to state schools, and they are accredited with the AVMA just like schools in the states. Many great students CHOOSE to go to international schools for a more worly and well-rounded experience, not because of grades or money. There are amazing vets from programs all over the world! :)

          2. Truth. Some of the most talented and well-rounded veterinarians I know graduated from Caribbean schools.

            #20 is also misleading in the sense that one cannot simply “buy” a Caribbean education. These schools have an application and interview process much like any program in the states… and even if there may generally be a little more leniency in terms of undergraduate GPA, acceptance is not guaranteed- nor is acceptance a guarantee that a student is actually going to make it through the program.

            I have friends who are international students. If I had the chance to go back and do it all over again, I would go international. By choice.

            .

          3. Some vet get very upset with pet owner, and ask them not to come back. But the staff go to other vet hospital to work and tell every about that person. Thing can not be keep to them self,
            I know a vet that told some one not to come back. Then the vet kill him self. He was the one that need the help.

          4. I am angry they even wrote that in there. Ross University student. Chose Ross over Stateside schools. That is one NARROW MINDED veterinarian. 

            Please disregard #20, all! The rest are true!

          5. I agree! I went to primary school in the US, my undergrad at an Ivy League, and when it came to applying to vet school I applied and got into 4; Ross, OVC (Canada), Edinburgh (UK) and Penn (US).

            I chose Ross because of their program structure and because of the great vets I have seen come out of this school (and the few “ehh” vets I have seen out of Penn and other US School). I do not regret my decision to go to an AVMA Accredited Caribbean school at all!

      2. I am a Ross grad. It was an amazing experience! In clinics, I knew just as much, if not more than the other students. The practical experience you get is the best. I had a chance to transfer to a state-side school, but decided I would benefit more from staying. As a side note, the people I know that went to St. George, ended up there because they failed out of Ross… that said, I have also met some great vets that went there as well.

    2. I think its just because there are a lot of people who go there because they didnt get into veterinary school in the states. I wouldn’t say it is any less of a vet school because I don’t know much about them, but I know a fair number of people who are going there because they couldnt get into anywhere else so its hard to completely disagree with #20 even if they are deviating from the truth a bit

      1. Sarah even if they do go to school in another country, if it is not an accredited program, before they are allowed to practice in the states as a DVM they have to go through a very tough testing process, where many do not pass and have to continually retake until they are up on the education, protocols and procedures of the subjects.  They are tested in large animal, small animal, lab, surgery and anesthesia.  The reason the out of state schools are popular is because the US schools are very competitive and there are a small number of them.  Many human Drs become doctors because they weren’t good enough to get into veterinary school. 

      2. And
        when you say “a lot” of people how many people is that exactly? I’m
        curious because you just stated you don’t know much about these schools, yet you know
        “a lot” of people who go there. Seems like a pretty vague and ignorant statement
        to me. Maybe you should research how many US vet schools there are. Then go a
        little further and see how many people are accepted each year versus the amount
        of people who applied. “Deviating from the truth” is a bit of an
        understatement. These people may or may not have made these offshore programs
        their first choice, but keep in mind that their grades…may have had nothing
        to do with it. I suggest you educate yourself prior to posting information
        online for everyone to see.

        1. I went through the entire application process and am currently in my 2nd year of vet school for your information. There are 28 accredited vet schools and whether the Caribbean schools are truely accredited like the rest of them is still a little up in the air. They still need to.complete their 4th year rotations in the states and as a student who got into a vet school in the states, I’m frustrated that I will have to share my clinical time with someone who may have gone to a Caribbean school because they didn’t get into a school in the states and they just get to choose where they want to do their clinicals. And for your information, I know of 7 people who are at Ross because they got rejected from everywhere else and I personally don’t know of anyone who went there because it was their first choice school. I do know a veterinarian who went to Ross and I think he is brilliant. So I’m not saying those schools suck. I NEVER said that. I was just trying to play devil’s advocate. I’m so glad u took the to.understand that and not be so judgemental….

          1. You might want to think about what you can learn from those students that are stealing from your time in clinics. Also, they don’t just get to “choose” where to go. I hope when you are an alum you choose to participate in the application and admission process at your school and serve on an alumni committee in some capacity. Your school has a predetermined number of students they will fold into the program based on a budget and need for the tuition. Also, think about what you might learn from those student. Two of the Four Ross students that folded into my class were top choice residency picks. One is an Equine surgeon and the other a Radiologist. The radiologist was so qualified he was one of the rare few who skipped internship and was taken right into the residency programs. The GRE correlation for admittance is based on studies done that link the MCAT results to graduation rates and board passage for human medical students. If a school weighs more heavily on GRE for a student that has poor standardized testing ability they may never rank well enough for acceptance. As well, if a student is from a highly populated state like Texas, their applicant to acceptance ratio is much higher. A Texas student may go to an off shore school with academic standards and skills that far exceed that of an in-state student at a smaller school. I know we all start vet school as young idealistic gunners that think we must know everything about the world, but we don’t. I hope you open your mind to other ideas as you mature.

          2. And I’m frustrated that I will have to share my clinical time with someone who is so narrow minded as to think he will have a better education than those of us who went to Ross, a FULLY accredited school who have had more experience by our clinical year than you.

          3. Since you know so many student at Ross, you should know they don’t get to just pick where they do their clinical year. They have to earn it. The US school sets the standards. Students who go into the program at Ross are not even guaranteed placement in a US school for their clinical year. Many people go to Ross because they get more hands on experience than at US schools as was evident when the AVMA hosted students from all the schools in Colorado last semester and the Ross students stood out from the rest with their amazing knowledge and skills. As far as playing devil’s advocate, there is no reason to be unnecessarily rude especially when you don’t have your facts straight.

      3. And
        when you say “a lot” of people how many people is that exactly? I’m
        curious because you just stated you don’t know much about these schools, yet you know
        “a lot” of people who go there. Seems like a pretty vague and ignorant statement
        to me. Maybe you should research how many US vet schools there are. Then go a
        little further and see how many people are accepted each year versus the amount
        of people who applied. “Deviating from the truth” is a bit of an
        understatement. These people may or may not have made these offshore programs
        their first choice, but keep in mind that their grades…may have had nothing
        to do with it. I suggest you educate yourself prior to posting information
        online for everyone to see.

      4. And
        when you say “a lot” of people how many people is that exactly? I’m
        curious because you just stated you don’t know much about these schools, yet you know
        “a lot” of people who go there. Seems like a pretty vague and ignorant statement
        to me. Maybe you should research how many US vet schools there are. Then go a
        little further and see how many people are accepted each year versus the amount
        of people who applied. “Deviating from the truth” is a bit of an
        understatement. These people may or may not have made these offshore programs
        their first choice, but keep in mind that their grades…may have had nothing
        to do with it. I suggest you educate yourself prior to posting information
        online for everyone to see.

    3. Most students have to apply to US vet school several times before they get in. There are so few vet schools and too many students, very bright students with experience and great grades.  Some students choose to go out of the country for vet school because they want to be working on their DVM’s and not their applications. If they aren’t smart and organized enough, they won’t get through, no mater where they are.

    4. I went to school in the states, and I also want to disagree with number 20.  Students from Caribbean schools do clinicals in the US, and many of my friends attended those schools.  They are just as passionate and well educated as any other veterinarian, and have to pass the same tests (used to be even more tests) to be licensed.

    5. I went to school in the states, and I also want to disagree with number 20.  Students from Caribbean schools do clinicals in the US, and many of my friends attended those schools.  They are just as passionate and well educated as any other veterinarian, and have to pass the same tests (used to be even more tests) to be licensed.

    6. I agree- #20 is obviously from a veterinarian snob.  Many extremely qualified people are rejected from “traditional” vet schools as well just because there are so few of them-look at how many more schools there are for human medicine-as compared with how many people want to go.  It has nothing to do with them being poor students with bad test scores.  I know several people with literally perfect GPAs-perfect-as well as solid work experience, strong work ethic, amazing test scores, great applications, essays, interviews, etc who just didn’t get in or had to apply for years before getting in because competition is stiff.  And plenty of perfect students who DO get into so-called “real” vet schools fail out.

      From talking with admissions professionals at vet schools, I can also tell you that the difference between a student who gets in and one who does not can be completely arbitrary-they needed more males, they needed more minorities, they had a student from that undergrad college already, etc.  I also know some amazing vets who have started out or even finished at the ACCREDITED international schools, and often those folks work harder because they have something to prove, courtesy of comments like #20 in this article.  Those ARE vet schools, or your vet wouldn’t have gotten a license to practice vet medicine in the US, no matter what the ivy-league vet in this article says!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Some people like to travel by train because 
it combines the slowness of a car with the cramped public exposure of 
an airplane.

Dennis Miller

I think my pilot was a little inexperienced. We were sitting on the runway, and he said, “OK, folks, we’re gonna be taking off in a just few—whoa! Here we go.”

Kevin Nealon

“I can’t wait until your vacation is over.” 
—Everyone following you on Instagram

@kristencarney

A man knocked on my door and asked for a donation toward the local swimming pool. So I gave him a glass of water.

Comedian Greg Davies

Funny Jokes

Just found the worst page in the entire dictionary. What I saw was disgraceful, disgusting, dishonest, and disingenuous.

@sixthformpoet

Funny Jokes

Client: We need you to log in to the YouTube and make all our company videos viral.

From clientsfromhell.net

Funny Jokes

My cat just walked up to the paper shredder and said, “Teach me 
everything you know.”

@NicCageMatch

Funny Jokes

“Just because you can’t dance doesn’t mean you shouldn’t dance.” 
—Alcohol

@yoyoha (Josh Hara)

Funny Jokes

My parents didn’t want to move to Florida, but they turned 60 and that’s the law.

—Jerry Seinfeld

Funny Jokes

Q: What do you call an Amish guy with his hand in a horse’s mouth?

A: A mechanic.

Fields marked with an * are required
Foods That Harm Foods That HealWant a Free eBook?
FOODS THAT HARM, FOODS THAT HEAL offers important information about the role diet plays in the struggle against heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other serious illnesses. Answer the question below to receive your FREE digital eBook.

Someone in my household experiences the following conditions:

Send me a link to download FOODS THAT HARM, FOODS THAT HEAL:
By clicking below, I agree to the Trusted Media Brands Privacy Policy